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Encyclopedia > Alveolar consonant
Places of articulation
Labial
Bilabial
Labial-velar
Labial-alveolar
Labiodental
Coronal
Linguolabial
Interdental
Dental
Alveolar
Apical
Laminal
Postalveolar
Alveolo-palatal
Retroflex
Dorsal
Palatal
Labial-palatal
Velar
Uvular
Uvular-epiglottal
Radical
Pharyngeal
Epiglotto-pharyngeal
Epiglottal
Glottal
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Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth. Alveolar consonants may be articulated with the tip of the tongue (so-called apical consonants), as in English, or with the flat of the tongue just above the tip (the "blade" of the tongue; called laminal consonants), as in French and Spanish. The laminal alveolar articulation is often mistakenly called dental, because the tip of the tongue can be seen near to or touching the teeth. However, it is the rearmost point of contact that defines the place of articulation; this is where the oral cavity ends, and it is the resonant space of the oral cavity that gives consonants and vowels their characteristic timbre. Places of articulation (passive & active): 1. ... Labials are consonants articulated either with both lips (bilabial articulation) or with the lower lip and the upper teeth (labiodental articulation). ... In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips. ... Labial-velar consonants are doubly articulated at the velum and the lips. ... A labial-alveolar consonant is a consonant produced with two simultaneous places of articulation: At the lips (labial; a p, b, or m sound), and at the gums (alveolar; a t, d, or n sound). ... In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa. ... Coronal consonants are articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue. ... Linguolabials are consonants articulated by putting the tongue tip or tongue blade against the upper lip. ... Interdental consonants are produced by placing the blade of the tongue against the upper incisors. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ... An apical consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the apex of the tongue (i. ... A laminal consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the blade of the tongue, which is the flat top front surface just behind the tip of the tongue. ... Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants). ... Sagittal section of alveolo-palatal fricative In phonetics, alveolo-palatal (or alveopalatal) consonants are palatalized postalveolar fricatives, articulated with the blade of the tongue behind the alveolar ridge, and the body of the tongue raised toward the palate. ... Sub-apical retroflex plosive In phonetics, retroflex consonants are consonant sounds used in some languages. ... Dorsal consonants are articulated with the back of the tongue against either the hard palate, or the flexible velum just behind it, or even against the uvula. ... Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth). ... In phonetics, the labialised palatal approximant is a consonant with two constrictions in the vocal tract: with the tongue on the palate, and rounded at the lips. ... Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum). ... Uvulars are consonants articulated with the back of the tongue against or near the uvula, that is, further back in the mouth than velar consonants. ... A uvular-epiglottal consonant is a doubly articulated consonant pronounced by making a simultaneous uvular consonant and epiglottal consonant. ... Radical consonants are articulated with the root (base) of the tongue in the throat. ... A pharyngeal consonant is a type of consonant which is articulated with the root of the tongue against the pharynx. ... An epiglotto-pharyngeal consonant is a newly reported type of consonant, articulated with the epiglottis against the back wall of the pharynx. ... An epiglottal consonant is a consonant that is articulated with the aryepiglottal folds (see larynx) against the epiglottis. ... Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone = sound/voice) is the study of sounds (voice). ... The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... An alveolar ridge is one of the two jaw ridges either on the roof of the mouth between the upper teeth and the hard palate or on the bottom of the mouth behind the lower teeth. ... The alveoli (singular:alveolus), tiny hollow sacs which are continuous with the airways, are the sites of gas exchange with the blood. ... An apical consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the apex of the tongue (i. ... A laminal consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the blade of the tongue, which is the flat top front surface just behind the tip of the tongue. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ...


The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) does not have separate symbols for the alveolar consonants. Rather, the same symbol is used for all coronal places of articulation which aren't palatalized like English palato-alveolar sh, or retroflex. To disambiguate, the bridge ([s̪, t̪, n̪, l̪] etc) may be used for a dental consonant, or the under-bar ([s̠, t̠, n̠, l̠] etc) may be used for the postalveolars. Note that [s̪] differs from dental [θ] in being a sibilant, while [s̠] differs from postalveolar [ʃ] in being unpalatalized. The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... Coronal consonants are articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue. ... Palatalization means pronouncing a sound nearer to the hard palate, making it more like a palatal consonant; this is towards the front of the mouth for a velar or uvular consonant, but towards the back of the mouth for a front (e. ... Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants). ... Retroflex consonants are articulated with the tip of the tongue curled up and back so the bottom of the tip touches the roof of the mouth. ... In phonetics, a retracted or backed sound is one that is pronounced further to the back of the vocal tract than some reference point. ... Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants). ... A sibilant is a type of fricative, made by speeding up air through a narrow channel and directing it over the sharp edge of the teeth. ...


The bare letters [s, t, n, l] etc cannot be assumed to specifically represent alveolars. The language may not make such distinctions, such that two or more coronal places are found allophonically, or the transcription may simply be too broad to distinguish dental from alveolar. If it is necessary to specify a consonant as alveolar, a diacritic from the Extended IPA may be used: [s͇, t͇, n͇, l͇], etc. Nontheless, the symbols <s, t, n, l> themselves are frequently called 'alveolar', and the language examples below are all alveolar sounds. Places of articulation (passive & active): 1. ... In phonetics, an allophone is one of several similar phones that belong to the same phoneme. ... The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ...


(The Extended IPA diacritic was devised for speech pathology and is frequently used to mean 'alveolarized', as in the labioalveolar sounds [p͇, b͇, m͇, f͇, v͇], where the lower lip contacts the alveolar ridge.) // Speech pathology, also termed speech-language pathology and speech & language therapy (SLT, mainly in the UK) is the study of disorders that affect a persons speech, language and swallowing. ...


The alveolar/coronal consonants identified by the IPA are:

IPA Description Example
Language Orthography IPA Meaning in English
Image:Xsampa-n.png alveolar nasal English run [ɹʷɐn] run
Image:Xsampa-t.png voiceless alveolar plosive English tap [tʰæp] tap
Image:Xsampa-d.png voiced alveolar plosive English debt [dɛt] debt
Image:Xsampa-s.png voiceless alveolar fricative English suit [sut] suit
Image:Xsampa-z.png voiced alveolar fricative English zoo [zu] zoo
ʦ voiceless alveolar affricate German zeit [tsaɪt] time
ʣ voiced alveolar affricate Italian zucchero [ˈdzukkero] sugar
Image:Xsampa-K2.png voiceless alveolar lateral fricative Welsh Llwyd [ɬʊɪd] the name Lloyd or Floyd
Image:Xsampa-Kslash.png voiced alveolar lateral fricative Zulu dlala [ˈɮálà] to play
Image:Xsampa-rslash2.png alveolar approximant English red [ɹʷɛd] red
Image:Xsampa-l.png alveolar lateral approximant English loop [lup] loop
Image:Xsampa-4.png alveolar flap Spanish pero [peɾo] but
Image:Xsampa-lslash.png alveolar lateral flap Venda [vuɺa] to open
Image:Xsampa-r.png alveolar trill Spanish perro [pero] dog
Image:IPA alveolar ejective.png alveolar ejective Georgian [ia] tulip
Image:IPA alveolar ejective fricative.png alveolar ejective fricative
Image:Xsampa-d lessthan.png voiced alveolar implosive Vietnamese đã [ɗɐː] Past tense indicator
Image:Xsampa-doublebarslash.png lateral alveolar click Nama ǁî [kǁĩĩ] discussed

The alveolar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... The alveolar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up run in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The voiceless alveolar plosive is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... TAP may stand for: TAP Portugal (formerly TAP Air Portugal), an airline based in Portugal. ... The voiced alveolar plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... The voiced alveolar plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The voiceless alveolar fricatives are a type of consonantal sound. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up Suit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The voiced alveolar fricatives are a type of consonantal sound. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Giraffes in Sydneys Taronga Zoo Free monkeys islands at the São Paulo Zoo Panda enclosure at Chiang Mai Zoo Visitors feeding and petting tamed marmots at the Parc Animalier des Pyrenées Sea lions at the Melbourne Zoo For other uses of the term Zoo, see Zoo... The voiceless alveolar affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... A pocket watch, a common timekeeping device. ... The voiced alveolar affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Magnified crystals of refined sugar Magnification of typical sugar In general use, non-scientists take sugar to mean sucrose, also called table sugar or saccharose, a white crystalline solid disaccharide. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The voiceless alveolar lateral fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... The name Lloyd is a variation of the Welsh word llwyd or clwyd, which means grey or brown. The double-l represents the voiceless alveolar lateral fricative of Welsh, and was sometimes also represented as F, yielding the related name Floyd. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The voiced alveolar lateral fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Zulu (isiZulu in Zulu), is a language of the Zulu people with about 10 million speakers, the vast majority (over 95%) of whom live in South Africa. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The alveolar approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Red is any of a number of similar colors at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... ... The alveolar lateral approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term loop, in its general sense, refers to something that closes back on itself (such as a circle or ring). ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... The alveolar tap/flap is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Wiktionary is a Wikimedia Foundation project intended to be a free wiki dictionary (hence: Wiktionary) (including thesaurus and lexicon) in every language. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Alveolar consonant X-SAMPA Alveolar lateral flap ... The lateral alveolar flap is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Venda, also known as Tshivenda or Chivenda, is a Bantu language. ... Image:Xsampa-r. ... The alveolar trill is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages (such as Russian, Spanish, Armenian, and Polish). ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (or its younger counterpart puppy) is a mammal in the order Carnivora. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The alveolar ejective is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The alveolar ejective fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Alveolar consonant X-SAMPA Voiced alveolar implosive Image:IPA-voiced dental implosive. ... The voiced alveolar implosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-nonpulmonic. ... The lateral alveolar click is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... Nàmá, previously called Hottentot, is the most populous and widespread of the Khoisan languages. ...

See also

  Consonants (List, table) See also: IPA, Vowels  
Pulmonics Bilabial Lab'den. Dental Alveolar Postalv. Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyn. Epiglottal Glottal   Non-pulmonics and other symbols
Nasals m ɱ n ɳ ɲ ŋ ɴ  Clicks  ʘ ǀ ǃ ǂ ǁ
Plosives p b t d ʈ ɖ c ɟ k ɡ q ɢ ʡ ʔ  Implo­­sives  ɓ ɗ ʄ ɠ ʛ
Fricatives ɸ β f v θ ð s z ʃ ʒ ʂ ʐ ç ʝ x ɣ χ ʁ ħ ʕ ʜ ʢ h ɦ  Ejec­­tives 
   Approximants    β̞ ʋ ɹ ɻ j ɰ Other laterals  ɺ ɫ
Trills ʙ r ʀ Co-articulated approximants  ʍ w ɥ
Flaps & Taps ѵ̟ ѵ ɾ ɽ Co-articulated fricatives  ɕ ʑ ɧ
Lat. Fricatives ɬ ɮ Affricates  ʦ ʣ ʧ ʤ
Lat. Appr'mants l ɭ ʎ ʟ Co-articulated stops  k͡p ɡ͡b ŋ͡m
This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]
Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a voiced consonant. Shaded areas denote pulmonic articulations judged impossible.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alveolar consonant Totally Explained (526 words)
Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.
Alveolar consonants may be articulated with the tip of the tongue (so-called apical consonants), as in English, or with the flat of the tongue just above the tip (the "blade" of the tongue; called laminal consonants), as in French and Spanish.
The laminal alveolar articulation is often mistakenly called dental, because the tip of the tongue can be seen near to or touching the teeth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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