FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Alternative rock
Alternative rock
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity Limited before the success of grunge and Britpop in the 1990s. Widespread since then, although many artists remain underground.
Subgenres
BritpopCollege rockDream popGothic rockGrungeIndie popIndie rockNoise popPaisley UndergroundPost-rockShoegazingTwee pop
Fusion genres
Alternative danceAlternative metalPsychobillyIndustrial rockMadchester – Post-punk revival – Riot Grrrl
Regional scenes
MassachusettsSeattle, WashingtonIllinoisMarylandManchester, England
Other topics
BandsCollege radioHistoryIndependent musicLollapalooza

Alternative rock (also called alternative music, alt-rock or simply alternative; known primarily in the UK as indie) is a genre of rock music that emerged in the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. The term "alternative" was coined in the 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired bands on independent record labels that did not fit into the mainstream genres of the time.[1] As a musical genre, alternative rock consists of various subgenres that have emerged from the independent music scene since the 1980s, such as grunge, Britpop, gothic rock, and indie pop. These genres are unified by their collective debt to the style and/or ethos of punk, which laid the groundwork for alternative music in the 1970s.[2] Alternative hip hop (Bohemian hip hop) is a style of hip hop distinguished by socio-political lyrics, sparse beats that sample few and/or unusual sources (see jazz rap) and uniquely positive rhymes. ... Matt Hillyer of Texas-based Eleven Hundred Springs Alternative country is a term applied to various subgenres of country music. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Hardcore punk is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America around 1980. ... Two different electric guitars. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Alternative rock (also called alternative music[1] or simply alternative) is a genre of rock music that emerged in the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. ... Britpop is a subgenre of alternative rock that originated in the United Kingdom. ... College rock was a term used in the USA to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... Dream pop is a type of alternative rock that originated in Britain in the early 1980s, when bands like Cocteau Twins, The Chameleons, The Passions, Dead Can Dance, Dif Juz, Lowlife and A.R. Kane (to whom the term has been attributed) began fusing post-punk experiments with bittersweet pop... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of alternative rock that originated during the late 1970s. ... Grunge redirects here. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Noise pop is a term used to loosely describe a number of alternative rock bands that fuse punk rocks attitude and anger with the atonal noise, feedback, and free song structures of noise music, presented in a decidedly pop context. ... Paisley Underground is a term used to describe a genre of rock music, based primarily in Los Angeles, California, which was at its most popular in the mid-1980s. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Shoegazing was a generalized tag given to some alternative rock bands that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... This article is about the genre of music. ... Alternative dance (known primarily as indie dance in the United Kingdom) is a term used for the genre of music combining elements of dance-pop (or other forms of electronic dance music such as house or techno) and alternative rock genres such as indie pop. ... Alternative metal is an eclectic form of music that gained popularity in the early 1990s alongside grunge. ... Psychobilly is a genre of rock music that mixes elements of punk rock, rockabilly, and other genres. ... Industrial Rock is a musical genre which is a fusion between Industrial Music and specific Rock n Roll subgenres such as Punk, Oi!, Hardcore and later on Hard Rock. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... The post-punk revival is a movement in modern rock music consisting of Indie Rock, Punk Rock, Goth Rock, and Electronic bands that draw from the conventions of the original Post-Punk sound of the early 1980s, as well as the early 90s Britpop, 80s New Wave and... Riot grrrl (or riot grrl) is an indie/punk feminist movement that reached its height in the 1990s but continues to exert influence over alternative cultures. ... New England Conservatory of Music in Boston Massachusetts is a U.S. state in New England. ... Mural Amphitheater, Seattle Center (built 1962). ... Illinois, which includes Chicago, has a wide musical heritage. ... Famous musicians from Maryland include Francis Scott Key, who wrote The Star-Spangled Banner and pop punksters Good Charlotte, from Waldorf. ... For Mancunians, the popular musical heritage of the city has always been a source of great pride. ... This is a list of alternative music artists. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... This is a timeline of alternative rock, from its beginnings in the 1970s to the present. ... In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe independence from major commercial record labels and an autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ... Lollapalooza is an American music festival featuring rock, alternative rock, hip hop, and punk rock bands, dance and comedy performances, and craft booths. ... This article is about the genre. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe independence from major commercial record labels and an autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ... Grunge redirects here. ... Britpop is a subgenre of alternative rock that originated in the United Kingdom. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of alternative rock that originated during the late 1970s. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...


Though the genre is considered to be rock, some of its subgenres are influenced by folk music, reggae, electronic music and jazz among other genres. At times alternative rock has been used as a catch-all phrase for rock music from underground artists in the 1980s, all music descended from punk rock (including punk itself, New Wave, and post-punk), and, ironically, for rock music in general in the 1990s and 2000s. Folk song redirects here. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Underground music is music which has developed a cult following, independent of commercial success. ... New Wave was a music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock...


While a few artists like R.E.M. and The Cure achieved commercial success and mainstream critical recognition, many alternative rock artists during the 1980s were cult acts that recorded on independent labels and received their exposure through college radio airplay and word-of-mouth. With the breakthrough of Nirvana and the popularity of the grunge and Britpop movements in the early 1990s, alternative rock entered the musical mainstream and many alternative bands became commercially successful. REM or R.E.M. is an acronym for: Rapid Eye Movement, a phase during sleep U.S. rock music band R.E.M., formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 Roentgen equivalent man, a unit for measuring levels of exposure to radiation. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ...

Contents

The term "alternative rock"

The music now known as alternative rock was known by a variety of terms before "alternative" came into common use. "College rock" was used in the United States to describe the music during the 1980s due to its links to the college radio circuit and the tastes of college students. In the United Kingdom the term "indie" was (and still is) preferred; by 1985 the term "indie" had come to mean a particular genre, or group of subgenres, rather than a simple demarcation of status.[3] "Indie rock" was also largely synonymous with the genre in the United States up until the genre's commercial breakthrough in the early 1990s, due to the majority of the bands belonging to independent labels.[4] College rock was a term used in the USA to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ...


By 1990 the genre was called "alternative rock".[5] The term "alternative" had originated sometime around the mid-1980s;[6] it was an extension of the phrases "new music" and "post modern", both for the freshness of the music and its tendency to recontextualize the sounds of the past, which were commonly used by music industry of the time to denote cutting edge music.[2][7] Individuals who worked as DJs and promoters during the 1980s claim the term originates from American FM radio of the 1970s, which served as a progressive alternative to top 40 rock radio formats by featuring longer songs and giving the DJs more freedom in their song selections. One former DJ and promoter has said, "Somehow this term 'alternative' got rediscovered and heisted by college radio people during the 80s who applied it to new post-punk, indie, or underground-whatever music . . ."[8] Thus the original use of the term was often broader than it has come to be understood, encompassing punk rock, New Wave, post-punk, and even pop music, along with the occasional "college"/"indie" rock, all music found on the American "commercial alternative" radio stations of the time such as Los Angeles' KROQ-FM.[2] The use of the term "alternative" gained popular exposure during 1991 with the implementation of alternative music categories in the Grammy Awards and the MTV Video Music Awards, as well as the success of Lollapalooza, where festival founder and Jane's Addiction frontman Perry Farrell coined the term "Alternative Nation".[2] FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... KROQ-FM is a commercial radio station located in Los Angeles, California, broadcasting on 106. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The MTV Video Music Awards were established in 1984 by MTV to celebrate the top music videos of the year. ... Lollapalooza is an American music festival featuring rock, alternative rock, hip hop, and punk rock bands, dance and comedy performances, and craft booths. ... Janes Addiction is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... Perry Farrell (born Peretz Bernstein in New York City on March 29, 1959) is a musician who, as the frontman of Janes Addiction, was one of the pioneers of alternative rock. ...


Defining music as "alternative" is often difficult because of two often conflicting applications of the word. "Alternative" can describe music that challenges the status quo and that is "fiercely iconoclastic, anticommercial, and antimainstream," but the term is also used in the music industry to denote "the choices available to consumers via record stores, radio, cable television, and the Internet."[9]


Overview

One of the first popular alternative rock bands, R.E.M. relied on college radio airplay, constant touring, and a grassroots fanbase to break into the musical mainstream.
One of the first popular alternative rock bands, R.E.M. relied on college radio airplay, constant touring, and a grassroots fanbase to break into the musical mainstream.

"Alternative rock" is essentially an umbrella term for underground music that has emerged in the wake of the punk rock movement since the mid-1980s.[10] Throughout much of its history, alternative rock has been largely defined by its rejection of the commercialism of mainstream culture. Alternative bands during the 1980s generally played in small clubs, recorded for indie labels, and spread their popularity through word of mouth.[11] As such, there is no set musical style for alternative rock as a whole, although The New York Times in 1989 asserted that the genre is "guitar music first of all, with guitars that blast out power chords, pick out chiming riffs, buzz with fuzztone and squeal in feedback."[12] Sounds range from the dirty guitars of grunge to the gloomy soundscapes of gothic rock to the guitar pop revivalism of Britpop to the shambling innocence of twee pop. More often than in other rock styles, alternative rock lyrics tend to address topics of social concern, such as drug use, depression, and environmentalism.[11] This approach to lyrics developed as a reflection of the social and economic strains in the United States and United Kingdom of the 1980s and early 1990s.[13] Image File history File linksMetadata Padova_REM_concert_July_22_2003_blue. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Padova_REM_concert_July_22_2003_blue. ... REM or R.E.M. is an acronym for: Rapid Eye Movement, a phase during sleep U.S. rock music band R.E.M., formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 Roentgen equivalent man, a unit for measuring levels of exposure to radiation. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... An umbrella term is a word that provides a superset or grouping of related concepts, also called a hypernym. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about the genre of music. ...


Although alternative artists of the 1980s never generated spectacular album sales, they exerted a considerable influence on later alternative musicians and laid the groundwork for their success.[14] The popular and commercial success of Nirvana's 1991 album Nevermind took alternative rock into the mainstream, establishing its commercial and cultural viability.[15] As a result, alternative rock became the most popular form of rock music of the decade and many alternative bands garnered commercial and critical success. However, many of these artists rejected success, for it conflicted with the rebellious, DIY ethic the genre had espoused before mainstream exposure and their ideas of artistic authenticity.[16] As many of the genre's key groups broke up or retreated from the limelight, alternative rock declined from mainstream prominence. This article is about the American grunge band. ... For other uses, see Nevermind (disambiguation). ... The DIY punk ethic refers to the idea of doing it yourself, i. ...


In the first decade of the 21st century, mainstream rock has largely moved beyond alternative's 1980s roots and low-fidelity ethos. Today's most popular rock music acts, typified by youth-oriented modern rock groups such as Linkin Park that owe a debt to both metal and grunge, incorporate complex electronic beats and a sophisticated production style. Many alternative rock fans do not see these bands—despite their debt to the genre—as alternative, but rather as nu metal acts. In 2004, alternative rock received renewed mainstream attention with the popularity of indie rock and post-punk revival artists such as Modest Mouse and Franz Ferdinand, respectively.[17] Linkin Park is a rock band from Agoura Hills, California. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ... Modest Mouse is an North-American indie rock band formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington by singer/lyricist/guitarist Isaac Brock, drummer Jeremiah Green, bassist Eric Judy, and guitarist Dann Gallucci. ... Franz Ferdinand are an indie rock band that formed in Glasgow, Scotland in 2001. ...


Alternative rock in the United States

In the 1980s, alternative rock in the United States was primarily the domain of college radio stations. Most commercial stations ignored the genre. On television, MTV would occasionally show alternative videos late at night. In 1986, the network began airing the late-night alternative music program 120 Minutes, which would serve as a major outlet for the genre before its commercial breakthrough in the following decade. Ultimately, in the late 1980s, commercial stations such as Boston's WFNX and Los Angeles' KROQ began playing alternative rock, pioneering the modern rock radio format. Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... For the series of the same name in the United Kingdom, see 120 Minutes (UK TV series). ... Boston redirects here. ... WFNX is a New England commercial alternative music radio station. ... Modern rock is term commonly used to describe a rock music format found on American commercial radio. ...


The 1980s underground

Early American alternative bands such as R.E.M., The Feelies, and Violent Femmes combined punk influences with folk music and mainstream music influences. R.E.M. was the most immediately successful; its debut album, Murmur (1983), entered the Top 40 and spawned a number of jangle pop followers.[10] One of the many jangle pop scenes of the early 1980s, Los Angeles' Paisley Underground was a 1960s revival, incorporating psychedelia, rich vocal harmonies and the guitar interplay of folk rock as well as punk and underground influences such as The Velvet Underground.[10] REM or R.E.M. is an acronym for: Rapid Eye Movement, a phase during sleep U.S. rock music band R.E.M., formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 Roentgen equivalent man, a unit for measuring levels of exposure to radiation. ... The Feelies were an alternative rock band from Haledon, New Jersey. ... This article is about the band. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Murmur is the first full-length album released by Athens, Georgia alternative rock band R.E.M.. Released in April 1983, Murmur was preceded by the Chronic Town EP the previous year. ... -1... Paisley Underground is a term used to describe a genre of rock music, based primarily in Los Angeles, California, which was at its most popular in the mid-1980s. ... This article is about the rock band. ...


American indie labels SST Records, Twin/Tone Records, Touch & Go Records, and Dischord Records presided over the shift from the hardcore punk that then dominated the American underground scene to the more diverse styles of alternative rock that were emerging.[18] Minneapolis bands Hüsker Dü and The Replacements were indicative of this shift. Both started out as punk rock bands, but soon diversified their sounds and became more melodic,[10] culminating in Hüsker Dü's Zen Arcade and The Replacements' Let It Be (both 1984). They were critically acclaimed and drew attention to the burgeoning alternative genre. That year, SST Records also released landmark alternative albums by the Minutemen and the Meat Puppets, who mixed punk with funk and country, respectively. SST Records is a Lawndale, California based independent record label formed in 1978 in Long Beach, California by Black Flag founder/guitarist Greg Ginn. ... Twin/Tone Records was a record label based out of Minneapolis, Minnesota that operated from 1977 until 1994 and helped several local groups receive national attention. ... Touch and Go Records is an independent record label based in Chicago, Illinois, USA, which began life in 1979 in East Lansing, Michigan as a magazine put out by Tesco Vee. ... Dischord Records is a Washington, D.C.-based independent record label specializing in D.C.-area independent punk, hardcore, and post-hardcore music. ... Hardcore punk is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America around 1980. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... This article is about the rock band called Hüsker Dü. For other uses, see Husker Du. ... For other uses, see The Replacements (disambiguation). ... Zen Arcade is the third full-length album from the American rock band Hüsker Dü, released in July 1984 on SST Records. ... Let It Be is the third studio album from the American alternative rock band The Replacements, released in October 1984 on Twin/Tone Records. ... The Minutemen were an American Punk rock band from San Pedro, California comprised of singer/guitarist D. Boon, singer/bassist Mike Watt and drummer George Hurley. ... The Meat Puppets are an American rock band formed in January 1980, in the Sunnyslope neighborhood of Phoenix, Arizona. ...

R.E.M. and Hüsker Dü set the blueprint for much of the decade's alternative, both sonically and in how they approached their careers.[10] In the late 1980s, the U.S. underground scene and college radio were dominated by college rock bands like the Pixies, They Might Be Giants, Camper Van Beethoven, Dinosaur Jr, and Throwing Muses as well as post-punk survivors from Britain. Another major force was the noise rock of Sonic Youth, Big Black, Butthole Surfers, and others. By the end of the decade, a number of alternative bands began to sign to major labels. While early major label signings Hüsker Dü and the Replacements had little success, acts who signed with majors in their wake such as R.E.M. and Jane's Addiction achieved gold and platinum records, setting the stage for alternative's later breakthrough.[19][20] Some bands such as the Pixies had massive success overseas while they were ignored domestically.[10] By the start of the 1990s, the music industry was abuzz about alternative rock's commercial possibilities and actively courted alternative bands including Dinosaur Jr, fIREHOSE, and Nirvana.[19] File links The following pages link to this file: Sonic Youth ... File links The following pages link to this file: Sonic Youth ... Gordon in 2005 Kim Althea Gordon (born April 28, 1953, in Rochester, New York), is a musician, vocalist, and artist. ... Thurston Joseph Moore (born July 25, 1958 in Coral Gables, Florida) is an American musician best known as a singer, songwriter, guitarist and tallest member of the band Sonic Youth. ... Sonic Youth is an American alternative rock band formed in New York City in 1981. ... For other uses, see Pixie (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical group. ... Camper Van Beethoven is an American alternative rock group. ... Dinosaur Jr is an American alternative rock band formed in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1983 as Dinosaur. ... An early band formation (left to right): Narcizo, Hersh, Donelly, and Langston. ... Merzbow Einstürzende Neubauten Sonic Youth Melt Banana Lightning Bolt Neptune Noise rock describes one variety of post-punk rock music that became prominent in the 1980s. ... Sonic Youth is an American alternative rock band formed in New York City in 1981. ... Big Black was a noise rock band founded in Chicago, Illinois, United States, that was active between 1982 and 1987. ... The Butthole Surfers are an American rock band founded in 1981 by Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary in San Antonio, Texas. ... Indoor firehose A firehose is a thick, high-pressure hose used to carry water or other fire retardant (such as foam) to a fire to extinguish it. ...


Grunge and the "Alternative Nation"

Grunge was a subgenre of alternative rock created in Seattle, Washington, in the mid-1980s. Grunge was based around a sludgy, murky guitar sound that synthesized heavy metal and punk rock.[21] In the early 1990s, it launched a large movement in mainstream music. The year 1991 was very significant for alternative rock, especially grunge, with the release of Nirvana's second and most successful album, Nevermind; Pearl Jam's breakthrough debut, Ten; Soundgarden's Badmotorfinger; and Red Hot Chili Peppers' Blood Sugar Sex Magik. Nirvana's surprise success with Nevermind heralded a "new openness to alternative rock" among commercial radio stations, opening doors for heavier alternative bands in particular.[22] In the wake of Nevermind, alternative rock "found itself dragged-kicking and screaming [. . .] into the mainstream" and record companies, confused by the genre's success yet eager to capitalize on it, scrambled to sign bands.[23] Grunge redirects here. ... Seattle redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... For other uses, see Nevermind (disambiguation). ... This article is about the rock group. ... Singles from Ten Released: 1991 Released: 1992 Released: 1992 Released: 1992 Ten is the debut studio album of Seattle-based rock band Pearl Jam, released on August 27, 1991 through Epic Records. ... Soundgarden was an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington in 1984 by lead singer and drummer Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. ... Badmotorfinger is the third album by the band Soundgarden. ... The Red Hot Chili Peppers are a Grammy-award winning American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1983. ... Singles from Blood Sugar Sex Magik Released: 1991 Released: 1991 Released: 1992 Released: 1992 Released: 1993 Blood Sugar Sex Magik is the fifth studio album by American alternative rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers, released on September 24, 1991. ...


The explosion of alternative rock was aided by MTV and Lollapalooza, a touring festival of diverse bands that helped expose and popularize alternative groups such as Nine Inch Nails, The Smashing Pumpkins, and Hole. The New York Times declared in 1993, "Alternative rock doesn't seem so alternative anymore. Every major label has a handful of guitar-driven bands in shapeless shirts and threadbare jeans, bands with bad posture and good riffs who cultivate the oblique and the evasive, who conceal catchy tunes with noise and hide craftsmanship behind nonchalance."[24] Alternative bands who were leery of broad commercial success and stayed underground were termed "indie rock"[4] and developed movements such as lo-fi, a genre that espoused a return to the original ethos of alternative music. Labels such as Matador Records, Merge Records, and Dischord, and indie rockers like Pavement, Liz Phair, Superchunk, Fugazi, and Sleater-Kinney dominated the American indie scene for most of the 1990s.[25] NIN redirects here. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... -1... Lo-fi is a subgenre of indie rock which uses lo-fi recording practices. ... Matador Records is a record label, famous for a roster of highly-respected indie rock artists and bands. ... Merge Records is an independent record label based in Durham, North Carolina. ... Pavement was an American indie rock band in the 1990s. ... Liz Phair (born Elizabeth Clark Phair on April 17, 1967 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Superchunk (left to right): Mac McCaughan, Jim Wilbur, Jon Wurster, Laura Ballance. ... Fugazi redirects here. ... Sleater-Kinney are an indie rock trio from Olympia, Washington influenced by the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s. ...


Alternative's mainstream prominence declined due to a number of events, notably the death of Nirvana's Kurt Cobain in 1994 and Pearl Jam's lawsuit against concert venue promoter Ticketmaster, which in effect barred them from playing many major venues around the country.[16] A signifier of alternative rock's declining popularity was the hiatus of the Lollapalooza festival after an unsuccessful attempt to find a headliner in 1998. In light of the festival's troubles that year, Spin said, "Lollapalooza is as comatose as alternative rock right now".[26] By the start of the 21st century, many major alternative bands, including Nirvana, The Smashing Pumpkins, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, Rage Against the Machine, and Hole had broken up or were on hiatus. Meanwhile indie rock diversified; along with the more conventional indie rock sounds of Modest Mouse, Bright Eyes, and Death Cab for Cutie, the garage rock revival of The White Stripes and The Strokes and the neo-post-punk sounds of Interpol and The Killers achieved mainstream success. Due to the success of these bands, Entertainment Weekly declared in 2004, "After almost a decade of domination by rap-rock and nu-metal bands, mainstream alt-rock is finally good again."[27] Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ... Ticketmaster is based in West Hollywood, California, USA, but has operations in many countries around the world. ... Spin is a music magazine that reports on all the music that rocks. Founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Rage Against the Machine, is an American rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1991. ... Modest Mouse is an North-American indie rock band formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington by singer/lyricist/guitarist Isaac Brock, drummer Jeremiah Green, bassist Eric Judy, and guitarist Dann Gallucci. ... Bright Eyes is a band consisting of singer-songwriter/guitarist Conor Oberst, multi-instrumentalist/producer Mike Mogis, Nate Walcott, and a rotating lineup of collaborators drawn primarily from Omahas indie music scene. ... Death Cab for Cutie is an American band formed in Bellingham, Washington in 1997. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... This article is about the American duo. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... For the international organisation, see Interpol. ... For other uses, see Killers. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...


Alternative rock in the United Kingdom

British alternative rock is distinguished from that of the United States by a more pop-oriented focus (marked by an equal emphasis on albums and singles, as well as greater openness to incorporating elements of dance and club culture) and a lyrical emphasis on specifically British concerns. As a result, few British alternative bands have achieved commercial success in the US.[28] Since the 1980s alternative rock has been played extensively on the radio in the UK, particularly by DJs such as John Peel (who championed alternative music on BBC Radio 1), Richard Skinner, and Annie Nightingale. Artists that had cult followings in the United States received greater exposure through British national radio and the weekly press, and many alternative bands had chart success there.[29] DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... For other persons named John Peel, see John Peel (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... Annie (formerly known as Anne) Nightingale MBE (born in London on April 1, 1942) is a radio broadcaster in the United Kingdom. ...


Genres and trends of the 1980s

Gothic rock developed out of late-1970s British post-punk. Most of the first goth bands, including Bauhaus, Siouxsie & the Banshees, and The Cure, are labeled as both post-punk and gothic rock. With a reputation as the "darkest and gloomiest form of underground rock," gothic rock utilizes a synthesizer-and-guitar based sound drawn from post-punk to construct "foreboding, sorrowful, often epic soundscapes," and the genre's lyrics often address literary romanticism, morbidity, religious symbolism, and supernatural mysticism."[30] Gothic rock began to develop into its own in the early 1980s with the opening of The Batcave nightclub and the emergence of a goth subculture. By the mid-1980s, goth bands such as The Sisters of Mercy, The Mission, and Fields of the Nephilim achieved success on the UK pop charts. Meanwhile Siouxsie & the Banshees and The Cure moved away from goth, broadening their sound and becoming internationally successful by the start of the 1990s. Bauhaus were an English rock band formed in Northampton in 1978. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees were a British rock band that formed in 1976. ... This article is about the band. ... The Batcave, which was held at Gossips in Dean Street (Soho), was an early goth nightclub in London, England. ... This article is about the subculture. ... For the religious organisation of this name, see Sisters of Mercy. ... The Mission (known as The Mission UK in the United States due to a naming clash with a Philadelphia R&B band) is a gothic rock band formed in 1986 from the splinters of the freshly-dissolved rock band The Sisters of Mercy. ... Fields of the Nephilim is a gothic rock band formed in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 1984. ...

Robert Smith of The Cure rejects the genre labels like alternative, gothic rock, and college rock applied to his band. He has said, "Every time we went to America we had a different tag [. . .] I can't remember when we officially became 'alt-rock'".
Robert Smith of The Cure rejects the genre labels like alternative, gothic rock, and college rock applied to his band. He has said, "Every time we went to America we had a different tag [. . .] I can't remember when we officially became 'alt-rock'".[31]

British indie rock and indie pop drew from the tradition of Scottish post-punk bands such as Orange Juice and Aztec Camera, utilizing jangly, shambling guitars and clever wordplay. The most popular and influential band to emerge from this lineage was Manchester's The Smiths. The band managed to score a number of hits and influence a generation of bands while signed to an independent label, Rough Trade Records. Their embrace of the guitar in an era of synthesizers is viewed as signaling the end of the New Wave era in Britain.[28] After The Smiths broke up in 1987, singer Morrissey embarked on a successful solo career. Indie rock bands such as The Housemartins and James emerged in their wake. The C86 cassette, a 1986 NME premium featuring such bands as The Wedding Present, Primal Scream, The Pastels, and the Soup Dragons, was a major influence on the development of indie pop and the British indie scene as a whole.[32][33] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x680, 90 KB) Summary Robert Smith from the Cure. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x680, 90 KB) Summary Robert Smith from the Cure. ... For other persons named Robert Smith, see Robert Smith (disambiguation). ... This article is about the band. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of alternative rock that originated during the late 1970s. ... College rock was a term used in the USA to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Orange juice (disambiguation). ... Aztec Camera was a Scottish New Wave music band from Glasgow. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987, based on the songwriting partnership of singer Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr. ... Rough Trade Records, now a member of the RIAA[1], began as an independent record label, based in London, England. ... For other uses, see Morrissey (disambiguation). ... The Housemartins were an English indie rock/accapella band that was active in the 1980s. ... James are a rock band from Manchester, England, formed in 1981. ... C86 is the name of a celebrated cassette compilation released by the British music magazine New Musical Express (NME) in 1986, featuring new bands licenced from independent labels of the time. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... The Wedding Present is a rock group based in Leeds, England, that was formed in 1985 from the ashes of the Lost Pandas. ... For other uses, see Primal Scream (disambiguation). ... The Pastels are a group from Glasgow, Scotland, UK. They have been described as an almost pop group. ... The Soup Dragons were a Scottish indie rock band of the late 80s and early 90s. ...


Other forms of alternative rock developed in the UK during the 1980s. The Jesus and Mary Chain wrapped their pop melodies in walls of guitar noise, while New Order emerged from the demise of post-punk band Joy Division and experimented with techno and house music, forging the alternative dance style. The Mary Chain, along with Dinosaur Jr and the dream pop of Cocteau Twins, were the influences for the shoegazing movement of the late 1980s. Named for the bandmembers' tendency to stare at their feet onstage, shoegazing acts like My Bloody Valentine, Slowdive, Ride, and Lush created an overwhelmingly loud "wash of sound" that obscured vocals and melodies with long, droning riffs, distortion, and feedback.[34] Shoegazing bands dominated the British music press at the end of the decade along with the drug-fueled Madchester scene. Based around The Haçienda, a nightclub in Manchester owned by New Order and Factory Records, Madchester bands such as The Stone Roses and the Happy Mondays mixed acid house dance rhythms with melodic guitar pop.[35] The Jesus and Mary Chain are a Scottish alternative rock band that revolves around the songwriting partnership of brothers Jim and William Reid. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... This article is about the band. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Alternative dance (known primarily as indie dance in the United Kingdom) is a term used for the genre of music combining elements of dance-pop (or other forms of electronic dance music such as house or techno) and alternative rock genres such as indie pop. ... Dream pop is a type of alternative rock that originated in Britain in the early 1980s, when bands like Cocteau Twins, The Chameleons, The Passions, Dead Can Dance, Dif Juz, Lowlife and A.R. Kane (to whom the term has been attributed) began fusing post-punk experiments with bittersweet pop... Cocteau Twins were a Scottish alternative rock band active from 1982 to 1997. ... Shoegazing was a generalized tag given to some alternative rock bands that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... This article is about the music group. ... Slowdive // Slowdive were a shoegazing band formed in 1989, lasting until 1995. ... Ride were a British shoegazing band. ... Lush was an English shoegazing band, formed in 1988. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Fac 51 Haçienda (better known as simply The Haçienda) was a nightclub and music venue in Manchester, England. ... FAC 115: Factory Records Stationery (1984) Factory Records was a Manchester based British independent record label, started in 1978, which featured several prominent musical acts on its roster such as Joy Division, New Order, A Certain Ratio, The Durutti Column, Happy Mondays, and (briefly) James and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the... The Stone Roses were an influential English rock band from Manchester formed in 1984. ... Happy Mondays are an English alternative rock band from Salford, Greater Manchester. ... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ...

Image File history File links Oasis_Noel_and_Liam_WF.jpg Summary Oasis brothers Noel and Liam Gallagher performing in 2005. ... Image File history File links Oasis_Noel_and_Liam_WF.jpg Summary Oasis brothers Noel and Liam Gallagher performing in 2005. ... Liam Gallagher (born William John Paul Gallagher on September 21, 1972, Burnage, Manchester, England) is an English singer and tambourine player of the band Oasis. ... -1... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ...

Britpop and post-Britpop trends

With the decline of the Madchester scene and the unglamorousness of shoegazing, the tide of grunge from America dominated the British alternative scene and music press in the early 1990s.[28] In contrast, only a few British alternative bands, most notably Radiohead and Bush, were able to make any sort of impression in the United States. As a reaction, a flurry of defiantly British bands emerged that wished to "get rid of grunge" and "declare war on America", taking the public and native music press by storm.[36] Dubbed "Britpop" by the media, this movement represented by Oasis, Blur, Suede, and Pulp was the British equivalent of the grunge explosion.[28] Centered on a revitalization of British youth culture celebrated as "Cool Britannia," it propelled alternative rock to the top of the charts in its home country. In 1995 the Britpop phenomenon culminated in a rivalry between its two chief groups, Oasis and Blur, symbolized by their release of competing singles on the same day. Blur won "The Battle of Britpop", but Oasis's second album, (What's the Story) Morning Glory?, went on to become the third best-selling album in Britain's history.[37] Oasis also had major commercial success overseas. Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... Bush was a post-grunge band from the UK, formed in 1992. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ... Suede (or The London Suede in the U.S.) were a popular and influential English rock band of the 1990s that helped start the Britpop musical movement of the decade. ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Cool Britannia is a media term that was used in the late 1990s to describe the contemporary culture of the United Kingdom. ... The Battle of Britpop is the unofficial title given to the chart battle of 1995 which took place between leading Britpop groups, Blur and Oasis. ... Singles from (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? Released: 24 April 1995 Released: 14 August 1995 Released: 15 September 1995 (Australia only) Released: 30 October 1995 Released: 19 February 1996 Released: 13 May 1996 (Australia and USA only) (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? is the second album by the...


Britpop faded as Oasis's third album, Be Here Now, received lackluster reviews and Blur began to incorporate influences from American alternative rock.[38] At the same time Radiohead achieved critical acclaim with its 1997 album OK Computer, which was a marked contrast with the traditionalism of Britpop. Radiohead, along with post-Britpop groups like Travis and Coldplay, were major forces in British rock in the subsequent years.[39] Recently British indie rock has experienced a resurgence, spurred in part by the success the Strokes achieved in the UK before their domestic breakthrough. Like modern American indie rock, many British indie bands such as Franz Ferdinand, The Libertines, Bloc Party, and Arctic Monkeys draw influence from post-punk groups such as Joy Division, Wire, and Gang of Four. For other uses, see Be Here Now (disambiguation). ... OK Computer is the third album by the English rock band Radiohead, released in 1997. ... Travis are a Scotish rock band from Glasgow, comprising Fran Healy (lead vocals, guitar, piano), Dougie Payne (bass, backing vocals, occasional lead vocals), Andy Dunlop (lead guitar, banjo, keyboards, backing vocals) and Neil Primrose (drums, percussion). ... Coldplay are an alternative rock band formed in London, England in 1997. ... Franz Ferdinand are an indie rock band that formed in Glasgow, Scotland in 2001. ... The Libertines were an English rock band formed in London in 1997 and active until 2004. ... This article is about the English alternative rock band. ... Arctic Monkeys are an English indie rock band from High Green, a suburb of Sheffield. ... Wire are an English rock band formed in 1976 (and intermittently active to the present) by Graham Lewis (bass, vocals), Bruce Gilbert (guitar), Colin Newman (vocals, guitar) and Robert Gotobed (né Grey) (drums). ... Gang of Four is an English post-punk group from Leeds. ...


Alternative rock in other countries

Australia has produced a number of notable alternative bands, including Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, The Go-Betweens, Dead Can Dance, Silverchair, The Vines, and Eskimo Joe. Double J, a government-funded radio station in Sydney and the Melbourne-based independent radio station 3RRR broadcast alternative rock throughout the 1980s. In 1990, Double J, now known as Triple J, began broadcasting nationally. Much like America's Lollapalooza festival, Australia's Big Day Out festival serves as a touring showcase for domestic and foreign alternative artists. To the east, New Zealand's Dunedin Sound was based around the university city of Dunedin and the Flying Nun Records label. The genre, whose heyday was the mid-1980s, produced bands such as The Bats, The Clean, Straightjacket Fits and The Chills. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x1600, 293 KB) The Arcade Fire live at Debaser, Stockholm, Sweden, 2005-03-15. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x1600, 293 KB) The Arcade Fire live at Debaser, Stockholm, Sweden, 2005-03-15. ... Arcade Fire is an indie rock band based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada which is based around the husband and wife duo of Win Butler and Régine Chassagne. ... Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is a successful rock band with international personnel. ... The Go-Betweens during recording of Oceans Apart: l-r Robert Forster and Grant McLennan The Go-Betweens were an internationally influential indie rock band from Australia, formed by guitarists Robert Forster and Grant McLennan in Brisbane in 1977. ... Dead Can Dance is a band comprised of Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry. ... This article is about the band. ... The Vines are an Australian garage rock band notable for producing a raw musical hybrid of 60s rock and 90s alternative music. ... For the restaurant, see Eskimo Joes. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... For other uses, see 3RR. 3RRR (pronounced Three Triple R, or simply Triple R) is a popular Australian community radio station, based in Melbourne. ... Double J redirects here. ... The Big Day Out (BDO) is an annual music festival that tours Australia and New Zealand which originated in Sydney in 1992. ... Dunedin is a southern New Zealand University Town that spawned The Dunedin Sound. Similar in many ways to the traditional indie pop sound, the Dunedin Sound uses jingly jangly guitaring, minimal bass lines and loose drumming. ... Dunedin (Ōtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... Flying Nun Records is probably the most influential independent record label in New Zealand. ... The Bats are an influential New Zealand rock band formed in 1982 in Christchurch by Paul Kean (bass), Malcolm Grant (drums), Robert Scott (guitar, vocals) and Kaye Woodward (vocals, other instruments). ... The Clean were an influential first-wave punk band that formed in Dunedin, New Zealand in 1978. ... Straitjacket Fits formed in Dunedin, New Zealand in 1986 and were a prominent band in the Flying Nun labels second wave of the Dunedin Sound. ... Taking a leaf out of the Beatles Help!, the Chills signal COLD in semaphore on the cover of their first studio album. ...


Mainstream alternative rock in Canada ranges from the humorous pop of Barenaked Ladies and Crash Test Dummies to the post-grunge of Our Lady Peace, Matthew Good Band, and I Mother Earth. In Montreal, an indie infrastructure developed in the aftermath of economic and social trouble during the 1990s. The city is now home to many indie rock bands such as the Arcade Fire, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, and The Dears.[40] Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ... This article is about a music group. ... OLP redirects here. ... Matthew Good (born June 29, 1971, Burnaby, British Columbia) is a Canadian rock musician. ... I Mother Earth, or IME, is a Canadian alternative rock band consisting of Brian Byrne (vocals), Bruce Gordon (bass), Christian Tanna (drums), and Jagori Tanna (guitar). ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Arcade Fire is an indie rock band based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada which is based around the husband and wife duo of Win Butler and Régine Chassagne. ... Godspeed You! Black Emperor (formerly punctuated Godspeed You Black Emperor!) is an avant-garde Canadian post-rock band based in Montreal, Quebec. ... The Dears are a Canadian indie rock band. ...


The Sugarcubes were the most successful band to emerge from Iceland.[41] After the band's breakup in the early 1990s, vocalist Björk embarked on a solo career that incorporated influences including trip hop, jazz, and electronica in addition to alternative rock. Icelandic indie rock bands include Múm and Sigur Rós. Continental Europe has produced numerous alternative styles and bands, from Germany's industrial rock and industrial metal acts such as KMFDM or Rammstein to more idiosyncratic bands like the Netherlands' The Gathering and Italy's Bluvertigo. The Sugarcubes were an Icelandic rock-pop band formed in 1986 and disbanded in 1992. ... This article is about the musician. ... Trip hop (also known as the Bristol sound) is a term coined by United Kingdom dance magazine Mixmag, to describe a musical trend in the mid-1990s; trip hop is downtempo electronic music that grew out of Englands hip hop and house scenes. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... múm (pronounced moom; in IPA, /mu:m/) is an experimental Icelandic musical group whose music is characterized by soft vocals, electronic glitch beats and effects, and a variety of traditional instruments. ... Sigur Rós ( ) is an Icelandic post-rock band with melodic, classical, experimental, and minimalist elements. ... Industrial Rock is a musical genre which is a fusion between Industrial Music and specific Rock n Roll subgenres such as Punk, Oi!, Hardcore and later on Hard Rock. ... Industrial metal is a musical genre that draws elements from industrial music and heavy metal music. ... KMFDM is an industrial rock band and the brainchild of founding member Sascha Konietzko. ... For other uses, see Ramstein. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bluvertigo is an Italian band formed in 1992. ...


Japan has an active noise rock scene characterized by groups such as Boredoms and Melt-Banana. Indie pop band Shonen Knife have been frequently cited as an influence by American alternative artists including Nirvana and Sonic Youth. Underground pop-influenced alternative rock went mainstream in the Philippines during the 1990s. Alternative Philippine rock bands include Eraserheads, Yano, Parokya ni Edgar, and Rivermaya. Boredoms (ボアダムス) (or V∞redoms) is an avant-garde rock band from Osaka, Japan. ... Melt-Banana is a Japanese noise rock band that was founded in 1992 by friends attending Tokyo University for Foreign Language. ... The all-female musical band Shonen Knife (少年ナイフ, Shōnen Naifu; lit. ... Pinoy Rock, or Filipino Rock, is the brand of Rock music produced in the Philippines or by Filipinos. ... Named after the film Eraserhead, The Eraserheads were the most popular pop/rock band in the Philippines from their early start in the early 1990s to their disbanding in 2002. ... Yano was a folk/punk rock band in the Philippines. ... Parokya ni Edgar is a Filipino band that was formed in 1993 by a group of Ateneo high school students. ... Rivermaya is one of the most influential alternative rock bands in the Philippines that descended from pop and rock explosion of the 90s, propelling the rise of subsequent mainstream rock acts. ...


Many bands active in Mexico in the early 1990s can be considered alternative rock, though they are generally grouped in the Rock en español genre. Fobia and Café Tacuba are two of the most popular bands. Argentina has many alternative rock bands. Groups such as El Otro Yo, Jaime sin Tierra, Bicicletas, Babasónicos, Peligrosos Gorriones, and Los Brujos emerged in the 1990s as part of the so-called Nuevo Rock Argentino (New Argentine Rock) movement. While alternative rock has not broken into the Argentine mainstream in a broad way, Babasónicos became one of the most popular bands in the country. Rock en español is the latest generation of Spanish language rock and roll. ... Fobia is a Mexican rock band from Mexico City, whose career started in 1990 with self-titled album which included the smash-hit song El Microbito. ... Café Tacuba (often spelled Café Tacvba) is a Grammy Award and Latin Grammy Award-winning musical group from Naucalpan, Mexico. ... El Otro Yo is an Argentine alternative rock band formed in the early 1990s. ... Babasónicos is an Argentinian rock band, formed in the early 1990s along with others such as Peligrosos Gorriones and Los Brujos. ...


See also

Alternative music portal

Image File history File links Musical_note_nicu_bucule_01. ... Matt Hillyer of Texas-based Eleven Hundred Springs Alternative country is a term applied to various subgenres of country music. ... Alternative hip hop (also known as alternative rap) is a genre that is defined in greatly varying ways. ... In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe independence from major commercial record labels and an autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. ... -1... This is a timeline of alternative rock, from its beginnings in the 1970s to the present. ...

Bibliography

Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground, 1981-1991 is a book by Michael Azerrad (ISBN 0-316-78753-1). ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Footnotes and references

  1. ^ Popkin, Helen A.S. (2006). "Alternative to what?" (http). MSNBC.com. Retrieved on June 21, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c d di Perna, Alan. "Brave Noise—The History of Alternative Rock Guitar". Guitar World. December 1995.
  3. ^ Reynolds, Simon. Rip It Up and Start Again: Postpunk 1978-1984. Penguin, 2005. Pg. 391. ISBN 0-14-303672-6
  4. ^ a b "Indie rock" is still sometimes used to describe the alternative rock of the 1980s, but as a genre term it generally refers to alternative music that stayed underground after the mainstream breakthrough of the genre in the early 1990s
  5. ^ Azerrad, Michael. Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground, 1981-1991. Little Brown and Company, 2001. Pg. 446. ISBN 0-316-78753-1
  6. ^ Thompson, Dave. "Introduction". Third Ear: Alternative Rock. San Francisco: Miller Freeman, 2000. Pg. viii
  7. ^ Reynolds, pg. 338
  8. ^ Mullen, Brendan. Whores: An Oral Biography of Perry Farrell and Jane's Addiction. Cambridge: Da Capo, 2005. Pg. 19. ISBN 0-306-81347-5
  9. ^ Starr, Larry; Waterman, Christopher. American Popular Music: From Minstrelsy to MTV. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pg. 430. ISBN 0-19-510854-X
  10. ^ a b c d e f Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "American Alternative Rock/Post-Punk". Allmusic. Retrieved May 20, 2006.
  11. ^ a b "Rock Music." Microsoft Encarta 2006 [CD]. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Corporation, 2005.
  12. ^ Pareles, Jon. (March 5, 1989). "A New Kind of Rock", NYTimes.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-01. 
  13. ^ Charlton, Katherine. Rock Music Styles: A History. McGraw Hill, 2003. Pg. 346-47. ISBN 0-07-249555-3
  14. ^ Our Band Could Be Your Life, pg. 3-5.
  15. ^ Olsen, Eric (2004). "10 years later, Cobain lives on in his music". MSNBC.com. Retrieved on June 22, 2006.
  16. ^ a b Considine, J.D. "The Decade of Living Dangerously." Guitar World. March 1999.
  17. ^ Dolan, Jon. "The Revival of Indie Rock." Spin. January 2005.
  18. ^ Reynolds, p. 390
  19. ^ a b Azerrad, Michael. Come As You Are: The Story of Nirvana. Doubleday, 1994. Pg. 160 ISBN 0-385-47199-8
  20. ^ Azerrad (1994), pg. 4
  21. ^ "Genre – Grunge". Allmusic. Retrieved on October 6, 2007.
  22. ^ Rosen, Craig. "Some See 'New Openness' Following Nirvana Success." Billboard. January 25, 1992.
  23. ^ Browne, David (1992). "Turn That @#!% Down!". EW.com. Retrieved on April 17, 2007.
  24. ^ Pareles, Jon (February 28, 1993). "Great Riffs. Big Bucks. New Hopes?", NYTimes.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-01. 
  25. ^ Azerrad (2001), pg. 495-497.
  26. ^ Weisbard, Eric. "This Monkey's Gone to Heaven." Spin. July 1998.
  27. ^ Hiatt, Brian; Bonin, Lian; Volby, Karen (2004). "The Return Of (Good) Alt-Rock". EW.com. Retrieved on August 28, 2007.
  28. ^ a b c d Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "British Alternative Rock". Allmusic. Retrieved May 20, 2006.
  29. ^ Charlton, pg. 349
  30. ^ "Genre – Goth Rock". Allmusic. Retrieved on October 6, 2007.
  31. ^ Spitz, Marc. "Robert Smith." Spin. November 2005.
  32. ^ Hann, Michael (2006). "Fey City Rollers". guardian.co.uk. Retrieved on November 12, 2006.
  33. ^ Hasted, Nick (2006). "How an NME cassette launched indie music". independent.co.uk. Retrieved on November 12, 2006.
  34. ^ "Genre – Shoegaze". Allmusic. Retrieved on October 6, 2007.
  35. ^ "Genre – Madchester". Allmusic. Retrieved on October 12, 2007.
  36. ^ Youngs, Ian. "Looking back at the birth of Britpop". BBC News. Retrieved June 9, 2006.
  37. ^ "Queen head all-time sales chart". BBC.co.uk (2006). Retrieved on January 3, 2007.
  38. ^ Harris, John. Britpop!: Cool Britannia and the Spectacular Demise of English Rock. Da Capo Press, 2004. Pg. xix. ISBN 0-306-81367-X
  39. ^ Harris, pg. 369-370.
  40. ^ Perez, Rodrigo. "The Next Big Scene: Montreal". Spin. February 2005.
  41. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "The Sugarcubes - Biography". Allmusic. Retrieved April 19, 2007.

is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground, 1981-1991 is a book by Michael Azerrad (ISBN 0-316-78753-1). ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

This article is about the genre. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÜ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... For other uses, see Chinese rock (disambiguation). ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Comedy rock is a term used to describe rock music that mixes the music with general comedy. ... For the geological term, see Country rock (geology). ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... -1... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alternative rock musical instruments such as electric guitars and acoustic guitars. (357 words)
Originally coined mostly for punk rock bands with their loud lyrics and hard driving musical instruments, alternative rock became a catch phrase for many different kinds of rock.
While considered to be solely influenced by the sounds of traditional rock bands using electric guitars, bass guitar, drums and keyboard synthesizers, alternative rock was also influenced heavily by other music genres such as jazz and folk music.
Alternative rock fills the holes left by bands that can't be pigeonholed into another established category of music, thus creating an interesting and largely varied genre of music.
Buy.com - Alternative Rock Music CDs (581 words)
The album that Patti Smith always wanted to make, Twelve features a collection of 12 diverse classic cover songs newly interpreted and handpicked by the rock legend for the important place they hold in her life as an artist.
Save now on thousands of titles in alternative music including the latest CDs from the biggest artists in alternative rock, punk, industrial & goth and ska.
Alternative Rock CDs by The White Stripes">Icky Thump: The White Stripes
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m