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Encyclopedia > Alphege
Saint Alphege
Born 954 in Weston, Somerset
Died 19 April 1012 in Greenwich, Kent
Venerated in Roman Catholicism; Anglican Communion
Canonized 1078, Pope Gregory VII
Feast 19 April
Attributes Archbishop holding an axe
Patronage Greenwich; kidnap victims
Saints Portal
For the first Bishop of Winchester of this name, see Alphege the Bald

Saint Alphege is the commonly used named for Ælfheah (954 - 19 April 1012), the Anglo-Saxon Bishop of Winchester and, later, Archbishop of Canterbury. Events King Malcolm I of Scotland is killed in battle against Highlanders. ... Weston is a suburb of Bath, located to the north west of the city centre. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Events Mael Morda starts a rebellion against Brian Boru in Ireland, which would eventually end in 1014 at the Battle of Clontarf. ... Greenwich (pronounced grenn-itch , or by the locals) is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The term Anglican (from medieval Latin ecclesia Anglicana meaning the English church) is used to describe the people, institutions, and churches as well as the liturgical traditions and theological concepts developed by the established Church of England, the Anglican Communion and the Continuing Anglican Churches (a loosely affiliated group of... Canonization is the process of declaring someone a saint and involves proving that a candidate has lived in such a way that he or she qualifies for this. ... Events Romanesque church begun at Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain Anselm of Canterbury becomes abbot of Le Bec William the Conqueror ordered the White Tower to be built Births Deaths Categories: 1078 ... Pope Gregory VII (c. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Symbology of the Saints The Catholic Church has used symbols from its very beginnings. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... Greenwich (pronounced grenn-itch , or by the locals) is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Saint Alphege the Bald is the commonly used named for Ælfheah the Bald (d. ... Events King Malcolm I of Scotland is killed in battle against Highlanders. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Events Mael Morda starts a rebellion against Brian Boru in Ireland, which would eventually end in 1014 at the Battle of Clontarf. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...

Contents

Life

Alphege was born in Weston in Somerset, of a noble family, but in early life gave up everything to devote himself to his faith. Having assumed the monastic habit in the monastery of Deerhurst, he passed thence to Bath, where he became an anchorite and ultimately abbot of the abbey there, distinguishing himself by his piety and the austerity of his life. In 984, he was appointed, through Dunstan's influence, to the Bishopric of Winchester and, in 1006, he succeeded Aelfric as Archbishop of Canterbury. Weston is a suburb of Bath, located to the north west of the city centre. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Location within the British Isles. ... Statistics Population: 84,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST745645 Administration District: Bath and North East Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Fire and rescue: Avon Ambulance: South Western Post office... Abbots coat of arms The word abbot, meaning father, has been used as a Christian clerical title in various, mainly monastic, meanings. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Enyu of Japan Emperor Kazan ascends to the throne of Japan Births Deaths Categories: 984 ... Dunstan (909–May 19, 988) was an Archbishop of Canterbury (961–988) who was later canonized as a saint. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Events Aelfheah (St. ... lfric, called the Grammarian (c. ...


At the sack of Canterbury by the Danes in 1011, Alphege was captured and kept in prison for seven months. Refusing to allow a ransom to be paid, he was murdered at Greenwich, Kent (now London), reputedly on the site of St Alfege's Church there, on 19 April 1012. Events Emperor Sanjo ascends to the throne of Japan. ... Greenwich (pronounced grenn-itch , or by the locals) is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of the United Kingdom and the largest city of England (strangely, England has no constitutional existence within the United Kingdom, and therefore cannot be said to have a capital). ... St. ...


Death

An account of his death appears in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals narrating the history of the Anglo-Saxons and their settlement in Great Britain. ...

. . . for there was wine brought them from the south. Then took they the bishop . . . on the eve of the Sunday after Easter . . . They overwhelmed him with bones and horns of oxen; and one of them smote him with an axe-iron on the head; so that he sunk downwards with the blow; and his holy blood fell on the earth, whilst his sacred soul was sent to the realm of God.

Some sources record the final blow, with the back of an axe, being dealt by one Thrum as an act of kindness by a Christian convert. He was buried in St Paul's Cathedral, whence his body was removed by King Canute to Canterbury, with all the ceremony of a great act of state, in 1023. St Pauls Cathedral from the south St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, England and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Statistics Population: 42,258 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TR145575 Administration District: City of Canterbury Shire county: Kent Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Ambulance service: South East Coast Post office and... Events The Judge-Governor of Sevilla takes advantage of the disintegration of the caliphate of Córdoba and seizes power as Abbad I, thus founded the Abbadid dynasty. ...


Veneration

Alphege was canonised in 1078. An incised paving slab to the north of the present High Altar of Canterbury Cathedral marks the place where the medieval shrine is believed to have stood. His feast day is 19 April. Events Romanesque church begun at Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain Anselm of Canterbury becomes abbot of Le Bec William the Conqueror ordered the White Tower to be built Births Deaths Categories: 1078 ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ...


Church dedications include: St Alphege the Martyr in Canterbury (now used as an urban studies centre), St Alfege's Church, Greenwich, the twin churches of St Alphege Whitstable and St Alphege Seasalter (chancel only surviving) and St Alphege in Solihull, the main town of the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull. There is also an unexpectedly charming 1930s Catholic church of St Alphege at Oldfield Park, Bath, which is closely modelled on a Roman basilica. Solihull (IPA: , or , or some combination of the two; occasionally ) is a large town in the West Midlands in England with a population of 94,753 [1]. It is a part of the West Midlands conurbation and is located 9 miles (14. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Solihull is a metropolitan borough in the county of West Midlands in England. ...


Records

Lives of St. Alphege in prose - which survives - and in verse were written by command of Lanfranc by the Canterbury monk, Osborn (d. c. 1090), who says that his account of the solemn translation to Canterbury in 1023 was received from the dean, Godric, one of Alphege's own scholars. Lanfranc (d. ... This article resolves the various uses of the name Osborne. ... Events Granada captured by Yusuf Ibn Tashfin, King of the Almoravides Beginnings of troubadours in Provence Bejaia becomes the capital of the Algeria Births William of Malmsbury Saint Bernard of Clairvaux Saint Famianus Eliezer ben Nathan of Mainz Deaths Saint Malcoldia of Asti Saint Adalbero Categories: 1090 ...

Religious Posts
Preceded by
Aelfric
Archbishop of Canterbury
1006–1012
Succeeded by
Lyfing

lfric, called the Grammarian (c. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Lyfing (d. ...

External links

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alphege (217 words)
Having assumed the monastic habit in the monastery of Deerhurst, he passed thence to Bath, where he became an anchorite and ultimately abbot, distinguishing himself by his piety and the austerity of his life.
He was buried in St Paul's, whence his body was removed by Canute to Canterbury with all the ceremony of a great act of state in 1023.
Lives of St. Alphege in prose (which survives) and in verse were written by command of Lanfranc by the Canterbury monk Osborn[?] (d.
Alphege - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (307 words)
Saint Alphege (Ælfheah) (954-April 19, 1012), Archbishop of Canterbury, came of a noble family, but in early life gave up everything to devote himself to his faith.
An incised paving slab to the north of the present High Altar of Canterbury Cathedral marks the place where the mediaeval shrine is believed to have stood.
Dedications include: St. Alphege the Martyr, Canterbury (now used as an urban studies centre), St Alfege's Church, Greenwich (?site of martyrdom) and the twin churches of St. Alphege Whitstable and St. Alphege Seasalter (chancel only surviving).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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