FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Alpha Tau Omega
Alpha Tau Omega
(ΑΤΩ)
Image:ATO Crest 2.JPG
ATΩ Crest
Founded September 11, 1865 (1865-09-11) (age 142)
Virginia Military Institute
Type Leadership, Social
Scope National
Motto πι εψιλον πι
Colors Azure and Old Gold
Symbol Heraldic Cross Pattee
Flower White Tea Rose
Chapters 245
Nickname Taus, Alpha Taus, ATOs
Headquarters One North Pennsylvania Street, 12th Floor
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Homepage http://www.ato.org
 prospective member homepage = [1] 

ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) (commonly known as ATO, Taus, Alpha Taus) is an American social fraternity that annually ranks among the top ten national fraternities for numbers of chapters and total number of members. ATO has more than 250 active and inactive chapters with more than 196,000 members and more than 6,500 undergraduate members. ATO is also one-third of the Lexington Triad, along with Kappa Alpha Order and Sigma Nu. The oldest active chapter is the Delta Chapter located at the University of Virginia. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links ATO_Crest_2. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... The term Azure (from Persian لاژورد lazhward) can refer to any of the following: The blueish color of the sky. ... Old Gold is a dark yellow, which varies from light olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Lexington Triad Monument The Lexington Triad refers to three national fraternities that were founded during Reconstruction in Lexington, Virginia. ... Kappa Alpha Order (commonly known as KA) is a collegiate Order of Knights and American social fraternity. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...

Contents

History

During and after the Civil War, families were torn apart, due to brothers fighting on opposite sides. A Virginia Military Institute student, Otis Allan Glazebrook, had a vision to reunite the North and the South in brotherhood. His ideals started Alpha Tau Omega as the first fraternity that would be considered a national fraternity, and it was with Erskine Mayo Ross, and Alfred T Marshall that they sought to bring together the two factions that had been torn apart. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ...


Creed

The Creed of Alpha Tau Omega

To bind men together in a brotherhood based upon eternal and immutable principles, with a bond as strong as right itself and as lasting as humanity; to know no North, no South, no East, no West, but to know man as man, to teach that true men the world over should stand together and contend for supremacy of good over evil; to teach, not politics, but morals; to foster, not partisanship, but the recognition of true merit wherever found; to have no narrower limits within which to work together for the elevation of man than the outlines of the world: these were the thoughts and hopes uppermost in the minds of the founders of the Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity.

-Otis Allan Glazebrook 1880


Founders

Otis Allan Glazebrook, Alfred E. Marshall, and Erskine Mayo Ross are recognized as the three founders of ATO. Following these, the next leader of ATO was Thomas Arkle Clark; Clark was the first Dean of Men at the University of Illinois and the President of the Gamma Zeta chapter at the University. Thomas A. Clark served the national fraternity as "Worthy Grand Chief" for several terms. To this day, the highest honor a graduating senior can achieve is the Thomas Arkle Clark Award. In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ...


Another man, Joseph Anderson, is known as the second founder of ATO. Because of a lack of organization and many chapters ignoring their responsibilities to the national fraternity -- including financial ones, ATO was on a devastating decline. In 1876, of the 22 chapters in existence at the time, only 2 attended the annual Congress. Joseph R. Anderson was appointed and accepted the position of Senior Grand Chief, or the National President, in 1870. Under Anderson, ATO was able to get back on track and become the well established fraternity it is today.


Famous ATO members

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Astronauts

Manley Lanier Sonny Carter, Jr. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Charles Moss Duke, Jr. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... NAME: Robert F. Overmyer (Colonel, USMC, Ret. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... David Wolf David A. Wolf (born 23 August 1956) is an American astronaut and a veteran of three space shuttle missions and an extended stay aboard the Mir space station. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ...

Business

BSC: Birmingham-Southern College is a 4-year, private liberal arts college in Birmingham, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1856, it is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... John David Bair (born in 1962, Bellefonte, PA, USA) is an American actor and stand-up comic Raised in Rowayton, CT, John Bair is the son of Robert and Barbara Bair. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the second largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Waffle House is a restaurant chain with 1500 stores found in twenty-five states in the United States. ... Gerald J. Ford (1945-). Farm boy turned thrift-trader bought first bank in 1975 for $1. ... Dallas Hall at Dedman College at SMU The Laura Lee Blanton Hall during a rare snow storm Southern Methodist University (commonly SMU) is a nationally recognized, private, coeducational university in University Park, Texas (an enclave of Dallas). ... Richard Severin Fuld, Jr. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings, Inc. ... Bausch & Lomb is an American company based in Rochester, New York, specializing in eye health products such as contact lenses, lens care products and eye surgery devices and instruments. ... Dallas Hall at Dedman College at SMU The Laura Lee Blanton Hall during a rare snow storm Southern Methodist University (commonly SMU) is a nationally recognized, private, coeducational university in University Park, Texas (an enclave of Dallas). ... Entrance of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California Beverly Hilton Hotel viewed from Wilshire Boulvard Hilton is a brand of the Hilton Hotels Corporation, based in Beverly Hills, California. ... James Phillip Hoffa (born May 19, 1941), is the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. ... The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, commonly known as the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) or simply the Teamsters, is one of the largest labor unions in the United States. ... For other uses, see Hoffa (disambiguation). ... John Jennings (1880-1956) was for over a decade a member of the United States House of Representatives from Tennessee. ... John Erik Jonsson (6 September 1901 - 31 August 1995) was a co-founder and former president of Texas Instruments Incorporated. ... Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN), better known in the electronics industry (and popularly) as TI, is an American company based in Dallas, Texas, USA, renowned for developing and commercializing semiconductor and computer technology. ... UGA Main Library The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturers, distributors and marketers of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC Central (1970-2001) NFC North (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Purple, Gold, White Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Viktor the Viking, Ragnar Personnel Owner Zygi Wilf General... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Julius Curtis Lewis, Jr. ... William Mitchell refers to more than one historical figure: Billy Mitchell, father of the U.S. Air Force William A. Mitchell, corporate chemist responsible for Tang and Pop Rocks William D. Mitchell, U.S. Attorney General Sir William Mitchell, Oxford physicist who helped pioneer neutron scattering, and former scientific advisory... Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN), better known in the electronics industry (and popularly) as TI, is an American company based in Dallas, Texas, USA, renowned for developing and commercializing semiconductor and computer technology. ... BSC: Birmingham-Southern College is a 4-year, private liberal arts college in Birmingham, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1856, it is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... Waffle House is a restaurant chain with 1500 stores found in twenty-five states in the United States. ... Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is a private university located in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Arrow Electronics NYSE: ARW is a Fortune 500 company headquartered in Melville, New York. ... Christopher A. Sinclair (b. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the second largest global American beverage and snack company. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a flagship public land-grant, sea-grant[3] major research university located on a 2,000 acre campus in Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ...

Education

Drake University is a private, co-educational university located in the city of Des Moines, Iowa. ... Frank Hereford (died 2004) was the president of the University of Virginia from 1974-1985. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania is a business school at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. The school was founded by Joseph Wharton, who also was one of the founders of Swarthmore College (founded in 1864), in 1881 as the first collegiate business school in the United States. ... Stephen C. OConnell was the sixth President of the University of Florida, and the first graduate of the University to serve as its President. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a flagship public land-grant, sea-grant[3] major research university located on a 2,000 acre campus in Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ... Troy Worldwide Logo Troy University (formerly Troy State University) is a public university located in Troy, Alabama and founded in 1887. ... Illinois State University is a public university in Normal, Illinois and is the oldest public institution of higher education in the state. ... Sir William Muir (April 27, 1819–1905), was a Scottish Orientalist. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... There are several notable individuals named Robert Kaplan, among them: Robert D. Kaplan, a travel writer, essayist, and international correspondent for The Atlantic; author of Balkan Ghosts, The Coming Anarchy, Warrior Politics, and numerous other books about culture, international relations, and liberal democracy Robert P. Bob Kaplan, a Canadian Liberal... Wren Building with a snow-covered statue of Lord Botetourt. ...

Entertainment and media

Dana Elcar Dana Elcar (October 10, 1927–June 6, 2005) was an American television and movie character actor. ... MacGyver is an American adventure television series, produced in the United States and Canada, about the laid-back, extremely resourceful secret agent MacGyver, played by Richard Dean Anderson. ... Hunter (born July 5, 1968) was a contestant on Survivor: Marquesas. ... Rob Estes, sometimes credited as Robert Estes (born on 22 July 1963 in Norfolk, Virginia, USA) is an American actor. ... Melrose Place is an American primetime soap opera that ran between 1992 and 1999, created by Darren Star for the FOX network. ... Silk Stalkings logo using Mistral typeface. ... Brad Fiorenza from The Real World: San Diego Brad Fiorenza (born November 11, 1980[1] in Orland Park, Illinois) was a cast member of MTVs The Real World: San Diego, the 14th season of the popular reality show, which aired in 2004. ... {{Infobox actor | bgcolour = green | name = Christopher Fitzgerald | image = | imagesize = | caption = | birthname = Christopher Cantwell Fitzgerald | birthdate = [[November 26} ]] 1972 Christopher Fitzgerald is an American actor, singer, mime, clown, juggler, and acrobat. ... Shelby Dade Foote, Jr. ... A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... For the actor, see Jack Ingram (actor). ... Matt (or Matthew) Jones may refer to: Matt Jones, a British television writer. ... Gregory Kinnear (born June 17, 1963) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and television personality, who rose to stardom as the first host of E!s Talk Soup. ... Talk Soup was a television show produced for cable network E! which debuted on December 26, 1991 and aired up until August 2002. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Art Linkletter caricature by Sam Berman for NBCs 1947 promotion book Art Linkletter (born Gordon Arthur Kelly on July 17, 1912) was the host of two of the longest-running shows in broadcast history: House Party, which ran on CBS radio and television for 25 years, and People Are... Elmer Lower is a former president of ABC News. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... Elliot Segal is a radio talk show host for Washington DCs rock station, WWDC (FM) DC101. ... Elliot in the Morning is a morning radio talk show hosted by DJ Elliot Segal. ... Frank Marshall (born September 13, 1946) is an American movie producer and director, often working in collaboration with Kathleen Kennedy. ... Amblin Entertainment logo. ... Garry Kent Marshall (born November 13, 1934) is an American actor/director/writer/producer. ... Pretty Woman is a 1990 American romantic comedy motion picture. ... Overboard is a movie starring Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell that was released in the summer of 1987. ... For other uses, see Happy Days (disambiguation). ... Laverne & Shirley was a popular American television situation comedy which ran on ABC from 1976 to 1983. ... Theodore Ted Ramón Stryker, born Gary Sandorf, and known on-air as simply Stryker (b. ... Jonathan Jack ONeill (born October 20, 1952)[1] is a fictional character in the science fiction feature film Stargate and the subsequent television series Stargate SG-1 played by actors Kurt Russell in the film (name spelled as ONeil) and Richard Dean Anderson in the series. ... The acoustic rock band Jackopierce was formed by Jack ONeill and Cary Pierce in their hometown of Dallas, Texas in 1988. ... Forrest Sawyer on the live debate episode of The West Wing in 2005. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... Nightline is a late-night hard and soft news program broadcast by ABC in the United States, and has a franchised formula to other networks and stations elsewhere in the world. ... Grant Show Grant Show is an actor who starred on Melrose Place as Jake Hanson from 1992 to 1997. ... Melrose Place is an American primetime soap opera that ran between 1992 and 1999, created by Darren Star for the FOX network. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the nickname Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright of the twentieth century who received many of the top theatrical awards for his work. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is a 1947 play written by American playwright Tennessee Williams for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1948. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Politics

Harvey Leroy Lee Atwater (February 26, 1951 – March 29, 1991) was an American Republican political consultant and strategist. ... The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... Birch Evans Bayh II (born January 22, 1928) was a U.S. Senator from Indiana between 1963 and 1981. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Richard Hudson Bryan (born July 16, 1937) was a governor of the U.S. state of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Alberto Al R. Cardenas (born in Cuba in 1948) is a partner in the law firm of Tew Cardenas. ... Lawton Chiles in an official picture taken during his first term as governor of Florida. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see James Eastland (disambiguation). ... Sam Gibbons Sam Melville Gibbons (born January 20, 1920) is a politician from the state of Florida, who served in the Florida State House of Representatives, Florida State Senate, and the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Edward John Gurney was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Florida; born in Portland, Maine on January 12, 1914; attended the public schools of Skowhegan and Waterville; graduated from Colby College, Waterville, Maine in 1935; received law degrees from the Harvard Law School 1938 and from Duke University... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Stephen H. Grimes was a former justice for the Florida Supreme Court. ... The Florida Supreme Court is the highest court in the State of Florida. ... Lee Hamilton redirects here. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... The Supreme Court of Georgia is the highest judicial authority of the U.S. State of Georgia. ... Harry Johnston Harry A. Johnston II is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... Michael Mansfield QC is a well-known British lawyer. ... Melquíades Rafael Mel Martínez (born October 23, 1946) is a Cuban-American, who is currently the junior United States Senator from Florida and the General Chairman of the Republican Party. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Lawrence Patton McDonald (April 1, 1935 – September 1, 1983) was an American statesman and a member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the seventh congressional district of Georgia as a Democrat. ... Korean Air Lines Flight 007, also known as KAL 007 or KE007, was a Korean Air Lines civilian airliner shot down by Soviet jet interceptors on September 1, 1983 just west of Sakhalin island. ... Harry Mitchell is the current Congressman from Arizonas 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Stephen C. OConnell was the sixth President of the University of Florida, and the first graduate of the University to serve as its President. ... The Florida Supreme Court is the highest court in the State of Florida. ... John Edward Porter (b. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Charles H. Smelser (Born on the 4th of July, 1920) was a Democratic State Senator and Delegate in Maryland. ... Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale (December 23, 1923 – July 5, 2005) was one of the most highly decorated officers in the history of the United States Navy. ... Alan Kooi Simpson (born September 2, 1931, in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.) is a Republican politician who served from 1979 to 1997 as a United States Senator from Wyoming. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Rep. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... General Charles Chuck F. Wald is the former Deputy Commander of United States European Command. ...

Science

Vannevar Bush (March 11, 1890 – June 30, 1974) was an American engineer and science administrator, known for his political role in the development of the atomic bomb, and the idea of the memex—seen as a pioneering concept for the World Wide Web. ... Arthur Holly Compton (September 10, 1892 – March 15, 1962) won the Nobel Prize in Physics (1927) for discovery of the effect named after him. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Karl Taylor Compton (1887-1954) was the president of MIT from 1930 until 1948. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Sports

Ernest Dominic Dom Capers (born August 7, 1950 in Cambridge, Ohio, and from Buffalo, Ohio) is the current defensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins and former head coach of the Houston Texans, and Carolina Panthers. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach liljimjim Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present... Christopher Frank Capuano (born August 19, 1978 in West Springfield, Massachusetts) is a Major League Baseball starting pitcher who currently plays for the Milwaukee Brewers. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Arthur Bud Collins (b. ... Anthony Cris Collinsworth (born January 27, 1959 in Dayton, Ohio), is a former American football player and current television sportscaster. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Lee Corso (born 1936) is a sports broadcaster and football analyst for ESPN. He has been featured on ESPNs College GameDay program since its inception and appears annually as a commentator in EA Sports NCAA Football. ... Len Dawson (born June 20, 1935) was an American football quarterback from Purdue University who played for three professional teams, most notably the Kansas City Chiefs. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Theodore Marvin Ted DiBiase Sr. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Terrance (Terry) Funk (born June 30, 1944) is an American professional wrestler, known chiefly for the hardcore wrestling style he adopted in the later part of his career that inspired many later wrestlers, most notably Mick Foley. ... Joseph Elliot Girardi (born October 14, 1964 in Peoria, Illinois) is a former catcher in Major League Baseball, for the Chicago Cubs, the Colorado Rockies, New York Yankees, and St. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Other nicknames The Fish Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ... Curtis Edward Gowdy (July 31, 1919 – February 20, 2006) was an American sportscaster, well-known as the longtime voice of the Boston Red Sox and for his coverage of many nationally-televised sporting events, primarily for NBC Sports in the 1960s and 1970s. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Louis Roy Groza (January 25, 1924 - November 29, 2000) was an American football placekicker who played his entire career for the Cleveland Browns. ... For the former professional American football player, see Keith Jackson (football player). ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Ernest Anyz (Chief) Koy Sr. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... William Little can refer to: William Little (Pittsburgh mayor), a politician in Pittsburgh. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Jim Mora is the former head coach of the Philadelphia/Baltimore Stars, New Orleans Saints and the Indianapolis Colts. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Gold and black Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo the dog League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference... Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC, SC, or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... Heisman redirects here. ... James Patrick Tressel,(born December 5, 1952) is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University. ... The Ohio State Universitys intercollegiate sports teams and players are called the Buckeyes (after the state tree, the Buckeye), and participate in the NCAAs Division I in all sports and the Big Ten Conference in most sports. ... Herbert Jackson Youngblood III (born January 26, 1950 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a former American football defensive end who played for the Los Angeles Rams. ...

References

External links

  • ATO National Fraternity
  • Leadershape
  • JoinATO.org
  • ATO Roadshow

  Results from FactBites:
 
Adrian College - Student Life (286 words)
Alpha Tau Omega is a group of men that, like our creed states, have come together to form "a brotherhood based upon eternal and immutable principals, with a bond as strong as right itself and as lasting as humanity.
Alpha Tau Omega (ATO) was also the first fraternity founded after the Civil War, the first fraternity based on Christian, not Greek, principals, and the first fraternity founded north of the Mason-Dixon Line.
ATO brothers can be found involved in the Student Government Association, the College World newspaper, the Department of Safety, theater productions, the Campus Activities Network, Resident Life, WVAC, intramural sports, various philanthropic events, as well as other organizations and activities.
Alpha Tau Omega History, University of Pennsylvania Archives (301 words)
Alpha Tau Omega did not appear, however, in four editions of The Record, those of 1887 through 1890, and may have disbanded in those years.
Alpha Tau Omega thereby became the first southern fraternity to expand into the North and successfully maintain chapters that part of the country.
Penn's Tau chapter resided at 3614 Walnut Street from 1905 through 1917; at 3912 Spruce Street from 1917 to 1929; and at 3914 Walnut Street from 1929 to 1971.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m