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Encyclopedia > Alpha Sigma Phi
ΑΣΦ – Alpha Sigma Phi
Founded December 6, 1845 (1845-12-06) (age 161)
Yale University
Type Social
Scope United States
Motto Causa Latet Vis Est Notissima

"The cause is hidden, the results well-known" December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... “Yale” redirects here. ...

Colors Cardinal and Stone
Symbol Phoenix
Flower Cardinal Rose and Yellow Tea Rose
Chapters 68 active, 140+ total
Headquarters 710 Adams Street
Carmel, Indiana, USA
Homepage alphasigmaphi.org

Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ, commonly abbreviated to Alpha Sig) is a social fraternity with 68 active chapters, colonies, and interest groups.[1] Founded at Yale in 1845, it is the 11th oldest fraternity in the United States. Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ...


The fraternity practices many traditions, some of which involve esoteric symbols. This is alluded to by the Latin motto, Causa Latet Vis Est Notissima ("The cause is hidden, the results well-known.").[2] The fraternity's official symbol is the phoenix, signifying the refounding of the fraternity in the early 1900s. Due to active expansion efforts, Alpha Sigma Phi continues to offer services and opportunities to over 2,000 undergraduate students and 40,000 living alumni.[3] For the opening number of Fiddler on the Roof, see Tradition (song). ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ...

Contents

History

Founding

Alpha Sigma Phi was founded at Yale College in 1845 as a secret sophomore society composed of many of the school's authors, poets, athletes, and scholars.[4] Upon rising through the ranks of the school, members shared membership with Alpha Sigma Phi in Skull and Bones, Scroll and Key, and eventually Wolf's Head.[5] For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ... A secret society is an organization that conceals its activities and membership from outsiders. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... The Scroll and Key Society is a secret society established by John Addison Porter and others at Yale University, New Haven, CT, in 1842. ... Wolfs Head (W.H.S.), founded in 1883, is the third oldest secret society at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The founders of Alpha Sigma Phi were:

Louis Manigault
  • Louis Manigault was the son of Charles I. Manigault, a wealthy rice planter from South Carolina who traced his ancestry to a Huguenot refugee who fled from Louis XIV's persecution and came to America in 1691. He served in the American Civil War as assistant to the Confederate Surgeon General. Moreover, he was a prominent plantation and slave owner in South Carolina (http://cameraobscura.dukejournals.org/cgi/reprint/21/1_61/71.pdf).
  • Stephen Ormsby Rhea was the son of John Rhea, an important cotton planter of Louisiana who helped open the disputed territory of West Florida and made it a part of the U.S. and state of Louisiana.
  • Horace Spangler Weiser, of York, Pennsylvania, was a descendant of Conrad Weiser, also a refugee from Europe who became famous in the French and Indian War, representing several colonies in treaty negotiations with Native Americans.[4]

Manigault and Rhea met at St. Paul's Preparatory School near Flushing, New York, where both were members of the same literary society and were preparing themselves for admission to Yale. Weiser attended a private school in New Haven, and he met Rhea early in his freshman year, who introduced him to Manigault. Image File history File links Manigault. ... Image File history File links Manigault. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... “Sun King” redirects here. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Map of East and West Florida in the early 1800s. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country United States State Pennsylvania County York Incorporated  - Borough September 24, 1787  - City January 11, 1887 Government  - Mayor John Brenner Area  - City  5. ... Johann Conrad Weiser (November 2, 1696 – July 13, 1760) was a German Pennsylvanian pioneer, farmer, monk, tanner, judge, and soldier. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,400 killed, wounded or captured The French and... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Flushing is a section of the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ...


Once at Yale, Manigault and Rhea became members of Yale's Calliopean Literary Society, and Weiser was a member of the Lininian Literary Society. Manigault was very much interested in the class society system at Yale and noted the class fraternities provided experience for their members and prepared them for competition in literary contests. The sophomore class there had only one society, Kappa Sigma Theta, which displayed an attitude of superiority toward non-fraternity men.[5]


Manigault revealed to his friend Rhea a plan for founding another sophomore society. Rhea agreed and enlisted Weiser to become the three founders of Alpha Sigma Phi. Their first official meeting was held in Manigault's room on Chapel Street on December 6, 1845. The constitution and ritual were then written and the fraternity pin was designed. The first pledge class, of 14 members, was initiated on June 24, 1846.[4] December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


After the birth of Alpha Sigma Phi, an intense rivalry began with Kappa Sigma Theta. The rivalry expressed itself in their publications, Kappa Sigma Theta's "The Yale Banger" and Alpha Sigma Phi's "The Yale Tomahawk." In 1852, the editors of The Tomahawk were expelled after violating faculty orders to cease publication. However, the rivalry between the organizations continued until 1858, when Kappa Sigma Theta was suppressed by the faculty.[5] 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Beyond Yale

Mu Chapter at the University of Washington
Mu Chapter at the University of Washington

The first charter was granted to Amherst College as Beta Chapter, but it only lasted about six months, at which time the parent chapter requested that it dissolve and return the constitution. However, a fragmentary document in the Yale library suggests that Beta was chartered in 1850 at Harvard but lived a very short life due to a wave of puritanism. The chapter at Harvard was revived in 1911 as Beta Chapter but only survived about 20 years; the charter was withdrawn due to Harvard's anti-fraternity environment. When Amherst was restored in 1854, it was designated as Delta Chapter. However, when the chapter at Marietta College was chartered in 1860, it too was given the Delta designation, despite the parent chapter being aware of this discrepancy.[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Aspwashington. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aspwashington. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Marietta College is a co-educational private college in Marietta, Ohio, which was the first permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


When the Civil War broke out across the United States, almost every member of Delta at Marietta enlisted in the Union Army.[citation needed] Three of the brothers gave their lives fighting for the Union cause. Former chapter presidents William B. Whittlesey and George B. Turner fell on the battle fields of Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain. They willed their personal possessions and their swords to the chapter, which treasured those mementos until the chapter closed in the mid 1990s.[5] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ... The American Civil Wars Battle of Lookout Mountain, also known as The Battle Above the Clouds took place on November 24, 1863 in southeastern Tennessee near Chattanooga. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


During the Civil War, the mother chapter at Yale was torn by internal dissension. Because less attention was being given to the sophomore class societies, some Alpha Sigma Phi members pledged to Delta Kappa Epsilon, a junior class society, and attempted to turn the control of Alpha Sigma Phi over to Delta Kappa Epsilon.[5] However, the attempt was thwarted by members of Alpha Sigma Phi who had pledged to the other two junior class societies. A conflict ensued, and the faculty suppressed Alpha Sigma Phi to end the disorder. However, the traditions of Alpha Sigma Phi were carried on by two new sophomore class societies, Delta Beta Xi and Phi Theta Psi. Louis Manigault sought to renew his loyalty and friendship with his brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi, and agreed with Rhea and Weiser to consider Delta Beta Xi its true descendant. They were unaware at the time that Delta Chapter at Marietta still existed as Alpha Sigma Phi.[5] Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ...


Refounding

The second founders were:

  • Wayne Montgomery Musgrave, an honors graduate of New York University, Yale and Harvard. He provided the organizational spark that fanned Alpha Sigma Phi into national prominence.
  • Edwin Morey Waterbury, born in Geneseo, New York on September 26, 1884, son of Dr. Reuben A. and Frances Waterbury. Dr. Waterbury was an educator, and vice-principal of the New York State Normal School at Geneseo from 1873 to 1895.[5]

With the inactivation of Delta Beta Xi at Yale, Alpha Sigma Phi was kept alive only at Marietta by Delta. At Yale, four friends agreed in a conversation over a card game that an organization was needed that was open to all students, instead of representing only the sophomore or junior classes. The four friends were Robert L. Ervin, Benjamin F. Crenshaw, Arthur S. Ely, and Edwin M. Waterbury.[4] A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Geneseo is a village in the Town of Geneseo in Livingston County, New York, USA. Its population is approximately 9,600. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Other members soon joined the group in their mission, the first of which were Fredrick H. Waldron and Wayne M. Musgrave. Ervin knew some of the alumni brothers of Delta at Marietta and asked them to send the first letter to Delta. On March 27, 1907, Ely, Crenshaw, Musgrave, Waldron, and Waterbury traveled to Marietta and were initiated into Alpha Sigma Phi. Upon returning to New Haven, they initiated the other friends they had recruited into the new Alpha chapter at Yale.[5] is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ...


Many of the old Alpha members returned to Yale upon hearing the news of the refounding, and helped acquire the fraternity's first piece of real estate, the "Tomb", a windowless two story building. No non-member was allowed entrance. No member could speak of the interior of the building, and were even expected to remain silent while passing by the exterior of the building.[5]


Expansion

Theta Chapter at the University of Michigan
Theta Chapter at the University of Michigan

A new national organization was formed at an Alpha Sigma Phi conference at Marietta in 1907, and within a year there were three new chapters: Zeta at Ohio State, Eta at the University of Illinois, and Theta at the University of Michigan. In 1910 another convention was held with the members of the former chapters at Yale, Amherst and Ohio Wesleyan University, and a delegation from the Yale Delta Beta Xi fraternity. All of these pledged to anew their loyalty to a restored Alpha Sigma Phi.[5] Image File history File links Aspmichigan. ... Image File history File links Aspmichigan. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Ohio Wesleyan University (also known as Wesleyan or OWU) is a private liberal arts college in Delaware, Ohio, United States. ... “Yale” redirects here. ...

Zeta Chapter at Ohio State. It has been on campus for 99 consecutive years.

Alpha Sigma Phi survived World War I fairly easily and even recruited many new members during those years. In the post-war era, Alpha Sigma Phi expanded at the rate of one chapter per year. In 1939, Phi Pi Phi merged with Alpha Sigma Phi, as the Great Depression left that fraternity with only five of its original twenty-one chapters. World War II hit Alpha Sigma Phi hard, with many brothers losing their lives due to the conflict, forcing many chapters to close.[4] Image File history File links ZetaHouse. ... Image File history File links ZetaHouse. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


On September 6, 1946, Alpha Kappa Pi merged with Alpha Sigma Phi. Alpha Kappa Pi had never had a national office, but was still a strong fraternity. During the war, they had lost many chapters and realized the need for a more stable national organization. Alpha Sigma Phi expanded again in 1965 by five more chapters when it merged with Alpha Gamma Upsilon.[4] is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 1980s found a younger generation of leaders taking the reins of the fraternity. Keeping in mind one of its oldest traditions, being a fraternity run by undergraduates, the leadership and undergraduates began expanding in new directions. In 2006, Alpha Sigma Phi won the North-American Interfraternity Conference's Laurel Wreath Award for the Ralph F. Burns Leadership Institute for new members.[5] The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...


In addition to the chapters in the United States, over 80 chapters have been chartered at universities and colleges throughout the Philippines.[6]

See also: Alpha Sigma Phi Philippines

There are four separate fraternities which are using the Greek name Alpha Sigma Phi in the Philippines, and they were organized and remain active to this day at the following universities: Gregorio Araneta University Foundation (1952); University of the East, Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, College of Medicine; Central Mindanao...

Symbols and traditions

The flag of AΣΦ
The flag of AΣΦ

The Old Gal - Traditionally, Alpha Sigma Phi has been referred to as "The Old Gal", an affectionate term so old that its origin is unknown. Alfred Dewey Follett, the first Grand Senior President of the fraternity, addressed the 1918 National Convention with his visualization of "The Old Gal."[2] Image File history File links Flag_of_Alpha_Sigma_Phi. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alpha_Sigma_Phi. ... It has been suggested that the section intro from the article Civil flag be merged into this article or section. ...

The Mystic Circle, a symbol of Alpha Sigma Phi
The Mystic Circle, a symbol of Alpha Sigma Phi

Annual Traditions - Most chapters hold an annual "Sig Bust", when alumni brothers return to renew fraternal ties and meet the current undergraduate membership. The highlight of the reunion is a traditional dinner. On or near December 6 each year, chapters hold a banquet or other observance of Founder's Day to honor the anniversary of the founding of Alpha Sigma Phi. Alumni brothers and special guests are invited to attend. It is a time of rededication of the fraternity to the pursuit of its goals and objectives.[2] Image File history File links Aspmysticcircle. ... Image File history File links Aspmysticcircle. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Chapter Designations - Chapters of Alpha Sigma Phi are given Greek-letter designations, assigned in order of installation into the Fraternity. No chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi is designated Omega, the last letter of the Greek alphabet that traditionally signifies "the end." Deceased brothers are respectfully referred to as having joined Omega Chapter.[2] The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... Look up Ω, ω in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

The Badge - The Badge of Alpha Sigma Phi is almost exactly the same design as that created by Louis Manigault in 1845. It is the only fraternity badge that is rectangular with right-angle corners. The badge of Alpha Sigma Phi is never to be modified in size or jeweled in any way. Every member of Alpha Sigma Phi wears exactly the same badge. Inscribed on the back of each member's badge is the brother's name, initiation date, chapter name (in Greek letters), and chapter founding date.[2] Image File history File links Aspbadge. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

The Pledge Pin - The Pledge Pin of Alpha Sigma Phi is an adaptation of the Badge of Alpha Kappa Pi, which consolidated with Alpha Sigma Phi in 1946. It is worn on the left lapel of a suit or sport coat or over the heart on sweaters or shirts. The Pledge Pin is the property of the Chapter and is entrusted to the Pledge in accordance to the instructions given to him. The symbolism of the Pledge Pin is explained in the Pledging Ritual.[2] Image File history File links Asppledgepin. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Delta Beta Xi Key - A special key, a replica of the Delta Beta Xi badge worn by Alpha Chapter at Yale from 1864 to 1875, recognizes outstanding service to the fraternity. It is worn only by brothers who are recipients of the Delta Beta Xi award. The award is given to no more than ten brothers each year by the Grand Council, based on nominations by chapters. The Delta Beta Xi key is suspended by a cardinal-and-stone ribbon, similarly to a military medal.[2] “Yale” redirects here. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Songs

Alpha Sigma Phi has a collection of traditional songs, many of them written over the years by Alpha Sig brothers. One of the first publications of the fraternity was a songbook. The Songs of Alpha Sigma Phi is available through National Headquarters as both a song book and a cassette tape.[7]


For He's an Alpha Sig

For he's an Alpha Sig,
He's a man you ought to know,
For he's an Alpha Sig,
He's not too fast and not too slow,
He's a gentleman and a scholar
with a heart beneath his vest;
He looks like all the others,
but he's better than the rest!
For he's an Alpha Sig,
He's a man you ought to, a man you want to,
a man you're sure to know!

The Sweetheart Song

Who says sweetheart to you,
who calls you all his own?
Who stands lonesome and blue,
talking of love to the moon up above?
Tell me whose eyes are gazing in yours,
Make all your dreams come true?
Who has the right to kiss you goodnight?
Tell me, whose Alpha Sig Girl are you?

The Loyalty Song

Now everyone knows Alpha Sigma Phi,
That they are the best just cannot be denied;
They have that style, that smile, that friendly way,
No matter where you'll go you'll recognize them,
and you'll say, "Now they're the Greeks I'd like to know
They've got that Alpha Sig fight, zip and go,
And just to see them smile is quite a treat,
Can't be beat, Alpha Sigma Phi!

Other notable songs include A Toast to Alpha Sigma Phi, Wake Freshmen Wake, The Table's Set, and Come Let's Gather.


Notable alumni

Name Chapter and Year Known For
Samuel Wright Bodman Cornell University 1961 United States Secretary of Energy (2005-)
Warren Buffett University of Pennsylvania 1948 CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, third richest man on the planet
Ted Cassidy West Virginia Wesleyan 1939 Actor, Lurch on The Addams Family
Ray Eliot University of Illinois 1932 American football coach
Arthur Flemming Ohio Wesleyan University 1927 United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare (1958-1961)
Burton Jastram University of California, Berkeley Gold medalist in Rowing at the 1932 Summer Olympics
Billy Johnson Widener University 1971 American football player
William Stone Hubbell U.S. Army Captain, Medal of Honor recipient[8]
Skip Humphrey American University 1962 Minnesota Attorney General (1983-1999)
John Kasich The Ohio State University 1974 Congressman from Ohio (1983-2001)
C. Everett Koop Dartmouth College 1938 Surgeon General of the United States (1982-1989)
Press Maravich Davis and Elkins College 1941 College basketball coach
John Ogden Merrill University of Wisconsin 1914 Partner of architectural firm Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
Jon Mittelhauser University of Illinois 1992 Co-founder of Netscape Communications
Reinhold Niebuhr Yale University 1914 Protestant theologian
David P. Gimbel American University 1953 Founded Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Alliance
Bennie Oosterbaan University of Michigan 1927 American football player and coach
Vincent Price Yale University 1930 Film actor, The Inventor in Edward Scissorhands
Gardner Rea The Ohio State University 1914 Cartoonist for The New Yorker magazine
Robin Reed Oregon State University 1926 Gold medalist in Wrestling at the 1924 Summer Olympics
Stephen Schnetzer University of Massachusetts 1967 Actor, Cass Winthrop on Another World
Willard Scott American University 1946 TV personality, weatherman on The Today Show
Tom Shipley Baldwin-Wallace College Member of 1970s folk rock duo Brewer & Shipley
Ross Swimmer Oklahoma University 1962 Special Trustee for American Indians at the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs
Ratan Tata Cornell University 1962 Chairman of the Tata Group, India's wealthiest business group
William H. Ward U.S. Army Captain, Medal of Honor recipient[8]
Tom Watson Stanford University 1971 Pro golfer, three-time Vardon Trophy winner
Frank Wolf Penn State 1960 Congressman from Virginia (1981-)
Andrew Dickson White Yale University 1850 Co-founder and first president of Cornell University

Samuel Bodman Samuel Wright Bodman (born 1938) is the United States Secretary of Energy and was previously Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department. ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... Seal of the United States Department of Energy The United States Secretary of Energy, the head of the United States Department of Energy, is concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Warren Edward Buffett (b. ... The University of Pennsylvania (also known as Penn[3][4]) is a private, coeducational research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRKA, NYSE: BRKB) is a holding company headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, U.S., that oversees and manages a number of subsidiary companies. ... Theodore Crawford Ted Cassidy (born July 31, 1932 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - January 16, 1979 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor who played Lurch (in which role he was able to demonstrate his genuine skill on the harpsichord) and Thing on The Addams Family. ... West Virginia Wesleyan College is a regionally accredited private, co-educational, liberal arts college in Buckhannon, West Virginia. ... Lurch is the fictional manservant to The Addams Family created by cartoonist Charles Addams. ... For the TV series, see The Addams Family (TV series). ... Ray Eliot (b. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Arthur S. Flemming (1905 - 1996) was Secretary of Health, Education & Welfare in the Eisenhower Administration and an important force in the shaping of Social Security policy for more than four decades. ... Ohio Wesleyan University (also known as Wesleyan or OWU) is a private liberal arts college in Delaware, Ohio, United States. ... The United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare was the head of the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Billy Johnson, aka White Shoes, was a pro football player in the 1970s and 1980s. ... Widener University is a private, metropolitan university located in Chester, Pennsylvania. ... William Stone Hubbell (April 19, 1837 – August 28, 1930) was a U.S. Army captain in the American Civil War, and a recipient of the Medal of Honor. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Hubert Horatio Skip Humphrey III is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... Minnesotas Attorney Generals Territory Lorenzo A. Babcock 1849-1853 Lafayette Emmett 1853-1858 State Charles H. Berry 1858-1860 Gordon E. Cole 1860-1866 William J. Colville 1866-1868 Francis R. E. Cornell 1868-1874 George P. Wilson 1874-1880 Charles M. Start 1880-1881 William J. Hahn 1881... John Kasich John Richard Kasich (born May 13, 1952, McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania) is a former United States Republican United States Representative who is now a television show host for FOX News Channel. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... C. Everett Koop Charles Everett Koop, M.D. (born October 14, 1916 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American physician. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Peter Press Maravich (August 29, 1915 - April 15, 1987), a first-generation American of Serbian descent, was a popular college and professional basketball coach. ... Davis and Elkins College is a small residential liberal arts college of 650 students located in Elkins, West Virginia. ... “University of Wisconsin” redirects here. ... Shaklee Terraces, San Francisco, designed in 1982 with a flush aluminum and glass facade and rounded corners. ... Jon E. Mittelhauser (born May 1970) is considered one of the the founding fathers of the World Wide Web [1]. In 1993 as a graduate student at the University of Illinois, he co-wrote NCSA Mosaic for Windows with fellow student Chris Wilson while working at the National Center for... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... 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Active chapters, colonies, and interest groups

A list of Alpha Sigma Phi Chapters Alpha Sigma Phi - Official website Categories: | ...

References

  1. ^ Alpha Sigma Phi Chapters. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Alpha Sigma Phi - Symbols and Traditions. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  3. ^ About Alpha Sigma Phi. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g History of Alpha Sigma Phi. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Alpha Sigma Phi - History. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  6. ^ Alpha Sigma Phi Philippines. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  7. ^ Songs of Alpha Sigma Phi. Retrieved on 2006-05-23.
  8. ^ a b Greek Heroes. Retrieved on 2006-11-21.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Alpha Sigma Phi - Official website
  • Songs of Alpha Sigma Phi - Audio recordings (WAV)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alpha Phi Sigma - Cameron University (301 words)
Alpha Phi Sigma is the nationally recognized honor society for students in the criminal justice sciences.
Members of Alpha Phi Sigma participate in the academic convocation ceremony held in the Fall semester each year.
At graduation, Alpha Phi Sigma members are allowed to wear the academic regalia indication that they are a member of the society.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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