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Encyclopedia > Alpha Phi Alpha
ΑΦΑ – Alpha Phi Alpha
The official crest of Alpha Phi Alpha.
Founded December 4, 1906 (1906-12-04) (age 100)
Cornell University Flag of the United States
Type Social
Scope International
Mission Statement
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. develops leaders, promotes brotherhood and academic excellence, while providing service and advocacy for our communities.
Motto First of All, Servants of All,
We Shall Transcend All
Colors Black       and Old Gold      
Symbol Great Sphinx of Giza, Great Pyramids of Giza, Pharaoh, Ape
Flower Yellow Rose
Publication The Sphinx
Chapters 680+
Cardinal Principles Manly Deeds,
Scholarship, and
Love For All Mankind
Headquarters 2313 St. Paul Street
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Homepage Alpha Phi Alpha.net
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. has continued to supply voice and vision to the struggle of African Americans and people of color around the world. The Fraternity has long stood at the forefront of the African-American community's fight for civil rights.
African American Portal

Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. Founded on December 4, 1906, on the campus of Cornell University (42.448510° N -76.478620° E) in Ithaca, New York, as a social fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha has initiated over 175,000 men into the organization and has been open to men of all races since 1945. The fraternity utilizes motifs and artifacts from Ancient Egypt to represent the organization and preserves its archives at the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... This article is about the color. ... , The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza is a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... 19th-century tourists in front of the Sphinx - view from South-East, Great Pyramid in background Giza pyramids, view from south in late 19th century. ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... Type species Troglodytes gorilla Savage, 1847 distribution of Gorilla Species Gorilla gorilla Gorilla beringei The gorilla, the largest of the living primates, is a ground-dwelling omnivore that inhabits the forests of Africa. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Khafres Pyramid (4th dynasty) and Great Sphinx of Giza (c. ... The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) is recognized as one of the worlds largest and most comprehensive repositories for the documentation of the history and culture of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and other parts of the world. ...


The founders, Henry Callis, Charles Chapman, Eugene Jones, George Kelley, Nathaniel Murray, Robert Ogle, and Vertner Tandy, are collectively known as the "Seven Jewels". The fraternity expanded when a second chapter was chartered at Howard University in 1907. Beginning in 1908, Alpha Phi Alpha became the prototype for other Black Greek Letter Organizations (BGLO). Today, there are over 680 active Alpha chapters in the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia, the West Indies, and the Virgin Islands. Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ...


Alpha Phi Alpha evolved into a primarily service organization and has provided leadership and service during the Great Depression, World Wars, Civil Rights Movements, and addresses social issues such as apartheid and urban housing, and other economic, cultural, and political issues affecting people of color. The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial is a project of Alpha Phi Alpha and the fraternity jointly leads philanthropic programming initiatives with March of Dimes, Head Start, Boy Scouts of America and Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. A world war is a war affecting the majority of the worlds major nations. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1954–1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... A Masai man in Kenya Black people or blacks is a political, social or cultural classification of people. ... The winning design for the Martin Luther King Jr. ... March of Dimes official logo March of Dimes is the name of health charities in both the United States and Canada. ... Head Start is a program of the United States Department of Health and Human Services that focuses on assisting children from low-income families. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... Big Brothers Big Sisters of America is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to help children reach their potential through professionally supported one-to-one relationships. ...


Members of Alpha Phi Alpha include Jamaican Prime Minister and Rhodes Scholar Norman Manley, Nobel Prize winner Martin Luther King, Jr., U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey, Olympian Jesse Owens, Justice Thurgood Marshall, United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, and Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson. Numerous other American leaders are among the men who have adopted the fraternity’s principles—manly deeds, scholarship, and love for all mankind. A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Norman Washington Manley (July 4, 1893 - September 2, 1969), was a Jamaican statesman. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... “MLK” redirects here. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an American track and field athlete. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... Alphas are members of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter organization established for African Americans. ...

History

Founding

The Arts Quad of Cornell University in 1919. Cornell University was the site of the founding of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., in 1905, although the organization would remain unnamed until 1906.
The Arts Quad of Cornell University in 1919. Cornell University was the site of the founding of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., in 1905, although the organization would remain unnamed until 1906.

At the start of the 20th century, black students attending American universities were often excluded from the personal and close associations the predominantly white student population enjoyed in existing fraternal organizations.[1] During the 1905–06 school year, Cornell University witnessed the organization of the first Greek letter fraternity for black students, by black students. Alpha Phi Alpha was organized with the stated desire of providing a mechanism to build those associations and provide mutual support among African American students. At the outset, there was disagreement about the group's purpose. Some desired to organize a social and literary club where all persons could participate. Others in the group supported a traditional fraternal organization. The overwhelming sentiment was dissatisfaction with lack of access to a literary society and members proposed to enlarge the functions of the group. The fraternal supporters were in the minority and the society thereafter organized with the intention of providing a literary, study, social, and support group for all minority students who encountered social and academic racial prejudice.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Cornell_Arts_Quad_1919. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cornell_Arts_Quad_1919. ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ...

The 1906 charter for ΑΦΑ's Alpha chapter at Cornell University.
The 1906 charter for ΑΦΑ's Alpha chapter at Cornell University.

At the first meetings during the 19061907 school year, members formed the nucleus of the organization's internal structure for the yet-unnamed "society". On October 23, 1906, Callis and Jones, acquainted with the Greek language, proposed that the organization be known by the Greek letters Alpha Phi Alpha, and Ogle proposed the colors to be old gold and black. The fraternity was still in process of formation and the divisive issue of whether the terms "club" or "fraternity" be used was debated within the group.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in the Indo-European language family. ...


By December 4, 1906, the members' views changed and the decision was made to become a fraternity. The prior designations of "club", "organization", and "society" were permanently removed.[2] is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The Seven Jewels

The original founding members of the first collegiate Greek letter organization for Negro students, with the Great Sphinx of Giza (built by Pharaoh Khafre) as their symbol were Henry Arthur Callis, Charles Henry Chapman, George Biddle Kelley, Nathaniel Allison Murray, Robert Harold Ogle, Vertner Woodson Tandy, and James Morton. The latter would be replaced in 1952 with the name of Eugene Kinckle Jones.[3] For an island of the Philippines, see Negros. ... , The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza is a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... The Pyramid of Khafra and the Great Sphinx of Giza Portrait of Khafra, originally found at Mit Rahina, now residing in the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo. ...

The Founders of Alpha Phi Alpha

Callis

Chapman

Jones

Kelley

Murray

Ogle

Tandy

Image File history File links Henry_Arthur_Callis. ... Henry Arthur Callis Henry A. Callis b. ... Image File history File links Charles_Henry_Chapman. ... Charles Henry Chapman Charles Henry Chapman was one of the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. ... Image File history File links Eugene_Kinkle_Jones. ... Eugene Kinckle Jones Eugene Kinckle Jones ( July 30, 1885 - January 11, 1954) was one the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. ... Image File history File links George_Biddle_Kelly. ... George Biddle Kelley George Biddle Kelley was one of the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906, and Alpha chapter’s first President. ... Image File history File links Nathaniel_Allison_Murray. ... Nathaniel Allison Murray Nathaniel Allison Murray was one the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. ... Image File history File links Robert_Harold_Ogle. ... Robert Harold Ogle Robert Harold Ogle was one the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. ... Image File history File links Vertner_Woodson_Tandy. ... Vertner Woodson Tandy Vertner Woodson Tandy was one of the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. ...

Consolidation and expansion

Soon after the Cornell organization formed, members opened Alpha Phi Alpha chapters at other colleges and universities. Chapters of Alpha Phi Alpha are given Greek-letter designations, assigned in order of installation into the Fraternity. No chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha is designated Omega, the last letter of the Greek alphabet that traditionally signifies "the end". Deceased brothers are respectfully referred to as having joined Omega Chapter. The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... Look up Ω, ω in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

The 1907 ΑΦA Constitution and By-Laws
The 1907 ΑΦA Constitution and By-Laws

The fraternity's constitution was adopted on December 14, 1907, limiting membership to "Negro male" students and providing that the General Convention of the Fraternity would be created following the establishment of the fourth chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha.[4] The preamble states the purpose of Alpha Phi Alpha in part as: Image File history File links Alphaconstitution. ... Image File history File links Alphaconstitution. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Look up Preamble in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

To promote a more perfect union among college men; to aid in and insist upon the personal progress of its members; to further brotherly love and a fraternal spirit within the organization; to discountenance evil; to destroy all prejudices; to preserve the sanctity of the home, the personification of virtue and the chastity of woman.

Howard University, on December 20, 1907, where founders Jones and Murray chartered the fraternity's second chapter, (Beta), was the site of the organization of the first black Greek letter organization among historically black schools.[5] Jones and Murray established (Gamma) on December 30, 1907 at Virginia Union University. The fraternity has established an Alpha Phi Alpha Archives at Howard University in Washington, D.C. to preserve the history of the organization.[6] Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


The Secretary of State of New York accepted the incorporation of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity on January 29, 1908. The purpose and objective of the fraternity within these articles of incorporation was declared to be "educational and for the mutual uplift of its members."[4] “NY” redirects here. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Articles of Incorporation (sometimes also referred to as the Certificate of Incorporation or the Charter) are the primary rules governing the management of a corporation, and are filed with a state or other regulatory agency. ...

The first General Convention of Alpha Phi Alpha, held at Howard University in 1908
The first General Convention of Alpha Phi Alpha, held at Howard University in 1908

The fraternity became international when it chartered a chapter at the University of Toronto in 1908, (although shortly thereafter the chapter became defunct and its seat was transferred to what is now Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas). Other international chapters have been chartered in London, England, Frankfurt, Germany, Monrovia, Liberia, the Caribbean and South Korea.[7] Image File history File links Alphafstconvent. ... Image File history File links Alphafstconvent. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Huston-Tillotson University is a historically black university in Austin, Texas. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Travis County Government  - Mayor Will Wynn Area  - City  296. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Monrovia in the 1800s. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ...


The first general convention assembled in December 1908 at Howard University in Washington, D.C., producing the first ritual and the election of the first General President of Alpha Phi Alpha, Moses A. Morrison.[8] Today, the office of the General President wields great influence beyond the fraternity, and each newly elected president is automatically considered one of the "100 most influential Black Americans."[9] For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

The fraternity established its first alumni chapter Alpha Lambda in 1911 in Louisville, Kentucky. The Fraternity was again incorporated as a national organization on April 9, 1911, under the laws of Congress within the District of Columbia, under the name and title of The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.[10] Henry Arthur Callis Henry A. Callis b. ... Chares H. Wesley Charles Harris Wesley (December 2, 1891 - August 16, 1987) was an noted African American historian, educator, writer and author. ... Rayford Wittingham Logan (January 7, 1897 - November 4, 1982) was an African American historian and Pan-African activist. ... Belford Vance Lawson, Jr. ... Ernest N. Morial as Mayor of New Orleans Ernest Nathan Morial (known as Dutch) (October 9, 1929 - December 24, 1989) was a U.S. political figure and a leading civil rights advocate. ... Henry Ponder Henry Ponder (b. ... Harry E. Johnson Harry E. Johnson (b. ... An alumnus (masculine) or alumna (feminine) of a college, university, or school is a former student. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...

The cover of the 2000 edition of The Sphinx magazine, the fraternity's official journal

For nearly 100 years Alpha Phi Alpha and its members have had a voice and influence on politics, current-affairs and key issues facing the world as founder and editor of national publications. The Crisis, the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), was started by fraternity member W.E.B. DuBois in 1910. In 1914, The Sphinx®, named after the Egyptian landmark, began publication as the fraternity's official journal. Still published, The Crisis and The Sphinx are the first and second oldest continuously published black journals in the United States, respectively.[11] The National Urban League's (NUL) Opportunity Journal, was first published in 1923 under the leadership of Alpha founder Eugene Jones, with fraternity brother Charles Johnson as its executive editor.[12] Image File history File links SphinxMagazine. ... Image File history File links SphinxMagazine. ... Editing may also refer to audio editing or film editing. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced ) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was a civil rights activist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar, and socialist. ... , The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza is a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... National Urban League Logo The National Urban League (NUL) is a nonpartisan civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion . If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...


The Training Camp at Fort Des Moines during World War I was the result of the fraternity's advocacy in lobbying the government to create an Officers’ training camp for black troops. Thirty-two Alpha men were granted commissions (four were made Captains and ninety percent were First Lieutenants). First Lieutenant Victor Daly was decorated with the Croix de Guerre for his service in France.[13] Today, the fort is a museum and education center which honors the U.S. Army's first officer candidate class for African American men in 1917.[14] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Saddle and accessories of the Buffalo Soldier. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... The Croix de guerre is a military decoration of both Belgium and France which was first created in 1915. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


While continuing to stress academic excellence among its members, Alpha's leaders recognized the need to correct the educational, economic, political, and social injustices faced by African-Americans and the world community.[15] Alpha Phi Alpha began its continuing commitment of providing scholarships for needy students and initiating various other charitable and service projects and evolved from a social fraternity to a primarily community service organization.[16]


Frederick H. Miller, 3rd General President of Alpha Phi Alpha said,

Our race suffers largely because its leaders have been unselfish with axes of their own to grind together with limited intelligence and twisted mental habits. Need I say I think Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity is the most promising organization among Negroes in existence.[17]

History: 1919–1949

Alpha Phi Alpha member and Harlem Renaissance entertainer Noble Sissle; photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1951
Alpha Phi Alpha member and Harlem Renaissance entertainer Noble Sissle; photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1951

The Fraternity's national programs date back to 1919 with the "Go-To-High School, Go-to-College" campaign to promote academic achievement within the African-American community being the first initiative. Alpha Phi Alpha would later participate in the voting rights debate and coined the well-known phrase A Voteless People is a Hopeless People as part of its effort to register black voters. The slogan remains in Alpha Phi Alpha's continuing voter registration campaign.[7] Image File history File links Noble_Sissle. ... Image File history File links Noble_Sissle. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Noble Sissle (born July 10, 1889 in Indianapolis, Indiana, died December 17, 1975 in Tampa, Florida) was an American jazz composer, lyricist, bandleader, singer and playwright. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. Â§ 1973-1973aa-6)[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50...


The 1920s witnessed the birth of the Harlem Renaissance–a flowering of African American art, literature, music, and culture which began to be absorbed into mainstream American culture. Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity brothers Charles Johnson, W.E.B. DuBois, Noble Sissle, Countee Cullen and other members were entrepreneurs and participants in this creative upsurge led primarily by the African American community based in Harlem, New York City. The fraternity had charted 85 chapters throughout the United States and initiated over 3,000 members by the end of the 1920s.[9] The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... African American art is a broad term describing the visual arts of the American black community. ... The Color Purple by Alice Walker African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In the United States, African American culture or Black culture includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... American cultural icons, apple pie, baseball, and the American flag. ... Noble Sissle (born July 10, 1889 in Indianapolis, Indiana, died December 17, 1975 in Tampa, Florida) was an American jazz composer, lyricist, bandleader, singer and playwright. ... Countee Cullen, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 Countee Cullen (May 30, 1903–January 9, 1946) was an African-American Romantic poet and an active participant in the Harlem Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

I want the Fraternity to stand out in the affairs of the Nation.
Vertner W. Tandy,
ΑΦA Founder [18]

During the Great Depression, Alpha Phi Alpha and its members continued to implement programs which it deemed affected the black community. The Committee on Public Policy, the Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation and "The Foundation Publishers" were established at the 1933 general convention. The Committee on Public Policy took positions on issues many in the black community deemed important. The first investigation of the committee was of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal agencies. The committee's agenda was to determine the status of the black population, both as to treatment of agencies' employees and in the quality of services rendered to American blacks.[19] Fraternity members Rayford Logan and Eugene Jones were members of Roosevelt's unofficial Black Cabinet.[20] The Education Foundation was created in recognition of the increasing educational, economic, and social needs of African Americans in the United States. The foundation, led by Rayford Logan, was structured to provide scholarships and grants to African American students. The Foundation Publishers would provide financial support and fellowship for writers addressing African American issues. Historian and fraternity brother John Hope Franklin was an early beneficiary of the publishing company.[9] Vertner Woodson Tandy Vertner Woodson Tandy was one of the seven founders (commonly referred to as Jewels) of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Cornell University in 1906. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... Rayford Wittingham Logan (January 7, 1897 - November 4, 1982) was an African American historian and Pan-African activist. ... The Black Cabinet was first known as the Office of Negro Affairs, an informal group of African American public policy advisors to United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... John H. Franklin John Hope Franklin (born January 2, 1915) is a United States historian and past president of the American Historical Association. ...

Jesse Owens, saluting on the center dais, was one of three Alpha Phi Alpha members who participated in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany.

The New Negro Alliance (NNA) was founded in 1933 by fraternity brother Belford Lawson, Jr. in Washington D.C. to combat white-run business in black neighborhoods that would not hire black employees. The NNA instituted a then-radical Don't Buy Where You Can't Work campaign, and organized or threatened boycotts against white-owned business. In response, some businesses arranged for an injunction to stop the picketing. NNA lawyers, including Lawson and Thurgood Marshall, fought back — all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States in New Negro Alliance v. Sanitary Grocery Co.[21] This became a landmark case in the struggle by African Americans against discriminatory hiring practices, and Don't Buy Where You Can't Work groups multiplied throughout the nation. The NNA estimated that by 1940, the group had secured 5,106 jobs for blacks because businesses could not afford to lose sales during the depression.[22] The fraternity sponsors an annual Belford V. Lawson Oratorical Contest in which collegiate members demonstrate their oratorical skills first at the chapter level, with the winner competing at the District, Regional and General Convention.[23] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (550x750, 55 KB)Historic Photo of Jesse Ownes being awarded the Gold Medal at the 1936 Olympics, from http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (550x750, 55 KB)Historic Photo of Jesse Ownes being awarded the Gold Medal at the 1936 Olympics, from http://www. ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an American track and field athlete. ... 1936 Olympics refers to both: 1936 Summer Olympics held in Berlin, Germany 1936 Winter Olympics held in Bavaria, Germany This number-oriented article is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Belford Vance Lawson, Jr. ... Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... Holding It was intended by the Congress that peaceful and orderly dissemination of information by those defined as persons interested in a labor dispute concerning terms and conditions of employment in an industry or a plant or a place of business should be lawful. ... A landmark decision is the outcome of a legal case (often thus referred to as a landmark case) that establishes a precedent that either substantially changes the interpretation of the law or that simply establishes new case law on a particular issue. ... Equal opportunity is a descriptive term for an approach intended to provide a certain social environment in which people are not excluded from the activities of society, such as education, employment, or health care, on the basis of immutable traits. ...


At the 1936 Summer Olympics, three fraternity brothers represented the United States: Jesse Owens, Ralph Metcalfe and Dave Albritton[24] In 1938, Alpha Phi Alpha continued to expand and once again became an international organization as it extended its roster of chapters to London, England and 1936 gold medal Olympian John Woodruff became a member of the fraternity.[25][26] The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... Ralph Harold Metcalfe (May 30, 1910 - October 10, 1978) was an American athlete who jointly held the world record for the 100 metre sprint. ... Dave Albritton (b. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... John Youie Woodruff (born July 5, 1915 in Connellsville, Pennsylvania) is a former American athlete, winner of 800 m at the 1936 Summer Olympics. ...

Plaintiff Donald Gaines Murray with Alpha Phi Alpha brothers Thurgood Marshall and Charles Hamilton Houston while Marshall practices his oral arguments in the mid-1930s.

Alpha Phi Alpha supported legal battles against segregation and Alpha trial lawyers argued many of the nation's major court cases involving civil rights and civil liberties. The case of Donald Gaines Murray v University of Maryland (1935) was initiated by the fraternity and successfully argued by Alpha men Thurgood Marshall and Charles Houston to successfully challenge biases at the university which had no laws requiring segregation in its colleges. The fraternity assisted in a similar case that involved fraternity brother Lloyd Gaines. In Gaines v. Canada, the most important segregation case since Plessy v. Ferguson, Gaines was denied admission to the Law School at the University of Missouri because he was black.[27] Alpha brothers Houston and Sidney Redmon successfully argued "States that provide only one educational institution must allow blacks and whites to attend if there is no separate school for blacks." From the Maryland state archives, http://www. ... From the Maryland state archives, http://www. ... A plaintiff, also known as a claimant or complainer, is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Charles Hamilton Houston (September 3, 1895–April 22, 1950) was a black lawyer, Dean of Howard University Law School and NAACP Litigation Director who helped play a role in dismantling the Jim Crow laws and helped train future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Holding The separate but equal provision of public accommodations by state governments is constitutional under the Equal Protection Clause. ... The University of Missouri–Columbia, (abbreviated MU and nicknamed Mizzou) is an institution of higher learning located in Columbia, Missouri, USA. Columbia is the flagship campus in the University of Missouri System with approximately 27,000 students. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha supported the U.S. after the Attack on Pearl Harbor inflamed U.S. sentiments against Japan as shown in U.S. propaganda.
Alpha Phi Alpha supported the U.S. after the Attack on Pearl Harbor inflamed U.S. sentiments against Japan as shown in U.S. propaganda.

In 1940, true to its form as the "first of first", Alpha Phi Alpha sought to end racial discrimination within its membership. The use of the word "Negro" in the membership clause of the constitution which referred to "any Negro male student" would be changed to read "any male student." This was the first official action by a BGLO to allow the admission of all colors and races; the fraternity has been interracial since 1945.[28][29] From http://ibiblio. ... From http://ibiblio. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article is about the actual attack. ...


After the Attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 and the nation's entry into World War II, the fraternity fought to secure rights for its membership within the ranks of Officers in the Armed Forces. The type of warfare encountered evidenced the nexus between education and war, with illiteracy decreasing a soldier's usefulness to the Army that could only be addressed with the inclusion of a large number of college educated men among the ranks of officers. Alpha men served in almost every branch of the military and civilian defense programs during World War II. The leadership of the fraternity encouraged Alpha men to buy war bonds, and the membership responded with their purchases.[30] The fraternity's long tradition of military service has remained strong to the United States and the world. Alpha's military leaders Samuel Gravely and Benjamin Hacker are followed by other fraternity members who lead and serve in the Armed Forces. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... An American War Bonds poster from 1942 War bonds are a type of savings bond used by combatant nations to help fund a war effort. ... Samuel Gravely, U.S. Navy photograph circa 1970. ... Rear Admiral Benjamin Thurman Hacker (1935-2003) was a U.S. Navy officer, who became the first Naval Flight Officer (NFO) to achieve Flag rank. ...


In 1946, fraternity brother Paul Robeson, in a Letter to the editor, published in The New York Times, referring to apartheid and South Africa's impending request to annex South-West Africa, a League of Nations mandate, appealed: Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was a multi-lingual American actor, athlete, bass-baritone concert singer, writer, civil rights activist, Communist sympathizer, Spingarn Medal winner, and Lenin Peace Prize laureate. ... A letter to the editor (sometimes abbreviated LTTE or LTE) is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern to its readers. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... South-West Africa is the former name (1884-1990) of Namibia under German (as German South-West Africa, Deutsch Süd-West Afrika) and (from 1915) South African administration when it was conquered from the Germans during World War I. Following the war, the Treaty of Versailles declared the territory... Mandates in the Middle east and Africa. ...

to my fellow Americans to make known their protest against such conditions to the South African Ministry in Washington; to send to the Council on African Affairs, an expression of support for these grievously oppressed workers in South Africa; to keep the South African situation in mind against the time when General Smuts will come to the United Nations Assembly to demand the annexation of South West Africa, which means more Africans for him to exploit.[31]

In 1947, Alpha Phi Alpha awarded Robeson the Alpha Medallion for his “outstanding role as a champion of freedom.”[31] South Africa formally excluded Walvis Bay from the mandate and annexed it as a South African enclave. It took until after the date for the first fully democratic elections in South Africa in 1994 had been set, before sovereignty over Walvis Bay was formally transferred to Namibia at midnight on February 28, 1994. - Seal on the building of German Embassies. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jan Smuts Field Marshal Jan Christiaan Smuts, OM, CH, ED, KC, FRS (May 24, 1870 – September 11, 1950) was a prominent South African and Commonwealth statesman, military leader, and philosopher. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Walvis Bay, Namibia Walvis Bay, (Dutch/Afrikaans Walvisbaai, meaning Whale Bay), is an area in Namibia with a checkered history. ... This cites very few or no references or sources. ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ...

History: 1950–1969

The general convention in 1952 was the venue for a significant historical action taken regarding the Seventh Jewel Founder. The decision "of placing Brother [Eugene] Jones in his true historical setting resulting from the leading role which he had played in the origin and development of the early years of the fraternity history" was made by a special committee consisting of Jewels Callis, Kelly and Murray and fraternity historian Charles H. Wesley. James Morton was removed as a founder, yet continues to be listed as one of the first initiates. This convention created the Alpha Award of Merit and the Alpha Award of Honor, for appreciation of the tireless efforts on behalf of African Americans, and were awarded to Thurgood Marshall and Eugene Jones.[32][33] Chares H. Wesley Charles Harris Wesley (December 2, 1891 - August 16, 1987) was an noted African American historian, educator, writer and author. ...

God grant from this assembly, this noble assembly of fraternity men, some of the leaders of our nation will emerge.
Martin Luther King, Jr.,
(Address to ΑΦΑ at Golden Jubilee) [34]

The civil rights movement coincided with Alpha Phi Alpha's 50th anniversary. Darryl R. Matthews Sr., 32nd General President of the fraternity defined a pilgrimage as "a personal, spiritual, historic and significant journey, which one takes to a place and for a purpose that has profound meaning to that individual."[35] Alpha Phi Alpha's first "pilgrimage" to Cornell was held in 1956 to celebrate the Golden Jubilee and drew about 1,000 members who traveled by chartered train from Buffalo, New York to Ithaca. Fraternity brother Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered the keynote speech at the golden anniversary banquet, in which he spoke on the "Injustices of Segregation". There were three living Jewels present for the occasion, Kelly, Callis and Murray.[36] “MLK” redirects here. ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... A keynote in literature, music or public speaking is the principal underlying theme of a larger idea — a literary story, an individual musical piece or event. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha member Thurgood Marshall (center), George E.C. Hayes and James Nabrit, congratulating each other, following the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education declaring segregation unconstitutional.

Alpha men were pioneers and at the forefront of the civil rights struggle begun in the 1950s.[15] In Montgomery, Dr. King led the people in the Montgomery Bus Boycott as a minister, and later as head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Birmingham saw Arthur Shores organize for civil rights while Thurgood Marshall was engaging in the fight for desegregation and integration in the landmark case of the United States Supreme Court, Brown v. Board of Education. Marshall employed mentor and fratenity brother Charles Houston's plan to use the de facto inequality of "separate but equal" education in the United States to attack and defeat the Jim Crow laws.[37] http://www. ... http://www. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... George E.C. Hayes, Thurgood Marshall, and James Nabrit, congratulating each other, following Supreme Court decision declaring segregation unconstitutional George Edward Chalmers Hayes (July 1, 1894 – December 20, 1968) was a Washington, DC lawyer who defended Annie Lee Moss, was the lead atorney in Bolling v. ... James Nabrit II, George E.C. Hayes, and Thurgood Marshall, congratulating each other, following Supreme Court decision declaring segregation unconstitutional James Nabrit III (1932-) is an African American civil rights attorney who won several important decisions before the U.S. Supreme Court. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State County Jefferson, Shelby Government  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (D) Area  - City  151. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... Congressman John Bingham of Ohio was the principal framer of the Equal Protection Clause. ... The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha contingency participates during the 1963 March on Washington.

In 1961, Whitney Young became the executive director of the National Urban League, and in 1963 the NUL hosted the planning meetings of civil rights leaders for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The Alpha Phi Alpha delegation was one of the largest to participate in the March on Washington.[38] Image File history File links Alphamarch. ... Image File history File links Alphamarch. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Whitney Young at the White House, 1964. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1968, after the assassination of fraternity brother Martin Luther King, Jr., Alpha Phi Alpha proposed erecting a permanent memorial to King in Washington D.C. The efforts of the fraternity gained momentum in 1986 after King's birthday became a national holiday and led to the creation of The Washington D. C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc to collect funds of $100 million for construction.[39] “MLK” redirects here. ...


History: 1970–2000

Beginning in the 1970s, new goals were being introduced to address current environment. The older social programs and policies were still supported, however; under the direction of General President Ernest Morial the fraternity turned its attention to new social needs. This included the campaign to eliminate the ghetto-goal on numerous fronts with housing development and entrepreneurship initiatives. Ernest N. Morial as Mayor of New Orleans Ernest Nathan Morial (known as Dutch) (October 9, 1929 - December 24, 1989) was a U.S. political figure and a leading civil rights advocate. ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background live as a group in seclusion, voluntarily or involuntarily. ...

Henry Arthur Callis Tower, the centerpiece of Channelwood Village in Akron, Ohio—namesake of a founder of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

The Federal Housing Act (of 1963) requested non-profit organizations to get involved with providing housing for low-income families, individuals and senior citizens. Alpha Phi Alpha was poised to take advantage of this program with government in improving urban housing living conditions. The Eta Tau Lambda chapter created Alpha Phi Alpha Homes Inc. with James R. Williams as the chairman to address these needs in Akron, Ohio. In 1971, Alpha Homes received an $11.5 million grant from HUD to begin groundbreaking on Channelwood Village with the Henry Arthur Callis Tower as it centerpiece. Channelwood contains additional structures named after General Presidents James R. Williams and Charles Wesley, and streets named for fraternity founders Tandy and Ogle. The Alpha Towers in Chicago and three other urban housing developments in St. Louis, Missouri— the Alpha Gardens, Alpha Towne and Alpha Village saw completion through Alpha Phi Alpha leadership.[40] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Henry Arthur Callis Henry A. Callis b. ... The FHAs logo The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) is a United States government agency created as part of the National Housing Act of 1934. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World Location within the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City  62. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...

Arguably the most recognized Alpha Phi Alpha member, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington.
Arguably the most recognized Alpha Phi Alpha member, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington.

In 1976, the fraternity celebrated its 70th Anniversary with dual convention locations: New York City and Monrovia. The fraternity launched the Million Dollar Fund Drive with three prime beneficiaries—the United Negro College Fund (UNCF), the National Urban League and the NAACP. The Executive Director of the NAACP stated, "Alpha Phi Alpha provided the largest single gift ever received by the civil rights group."[16] Image File history File links Martin_Luther_King_-_March_on_Washington. ... Image File history File links Martin_Luther_King_-_March_on_Washington. ... “MLK” redirects here. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The monument, which is on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential Memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ...


In 1981, the fraternity celebrated its Diamond Jubilee in Dallas, Texas, featuring a presentation of the New Thrust Program consisting of the Million Dollar Fund Drive, the Leadership Development and Citizenship Institutes, and the quest to obtain a national holiday for fraternity brother Martin Luther King, Jr.[41] A Diamond Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 60th anniversary. ... “Dallas” redirects here. ...


As the 21st century approached, Alpha Phi Alpha's long-term commitment to the social and economic improvement of humanity remained at the top of its agenda. The fraternity's 28th General President, Henry Ponder, said "We would like the public to perceive Alpha Phi Alpha as a group of college-trained, professional men who are very much concerned and sensitive to the needs of humankind; We will go to great lengths to lend our voices, our time, our expertise and our money to solve the problems that humankind must solve as we move into the 21st century."[16] Henry Ponder Henry Ponder (b. ...

We will go to great lengths to lend our voices, our time, our expertise and our money to solve the problems that humankind must solve as we move into the 21st century.

—Henry Ponder, Ebony Henry Ponder Henry Ponder (b. ...

In 1996, The World Policy Council (WPC) was created as a think tank to expand Alpha Phi Alpha's involvement in politics, and social and current policy to encompass international concerns. Since its founding, the council has offered positions on the AIDS Crisis, War on Terrorism, world hunger, and foreign and domestic policy to Congress, the White House, and those whose decisions shape the future.[9] This article is about the institution. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... In government, domestic policy is the counterpart of foreign policy; it consists of all government policy decisions, programs, and actions that primarily deal with internal matters, as opposed to relations with other nation-states. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


The United States Congress, in 1996, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to permit Alpha Phi Alpha to establish a memorial on Department of Interior lands in the District of Columbia.[42] The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ...


21st century

In 2006, more than 10,000 Alpha Phi Alpha members gathered in Washington, D.C. to participate in the fraternity’s centennial convention to lay the groundwork for another 100 years of service. The fraternity developed a national strategic plan which outlines the processes that Alpha Phi Alpha will utilize in its continuing efforts to develop tomorrow's leaders, promote brotherhood and academic excellence, while providing service and advocacy for its communities.[43]

Panorama of Alpha Phi Alpha members at Howard University during the Centennial General Convention held in Washington, D.C.
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity paraphernalia–the shield, depicting—seven stars, torch, dove, fasces, pyramids and Sphinx

The Centenary Report of the Alpha Phi Alpha World Policy Council was published in connection with the Centenary of Alpha Phi Alpha. This fifth report by the WPC addresses five separate issues of national or international import and include The Millennium Challenge, Hurricane Katrina and Extraordinary rendition.[44] Image File history File linksMetadata AlphaCentConvent. ... Image File history File linksMetadata AlphaCentConvent. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Alpha_Phi_Alpha_shield. ... Image File history File links Alpha_Phi_Alpha_shield. ... A shield is a protective device, meant to intercept attacks. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... This article is about portable open fires. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... Roman fasces. ... 19th-century tourists in front of the Sphinx - view from South-East, Great Pyramid in background Giza pyramids, view from south in late 19th century. ... , The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza is a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... Participants in the Program; United States as donor is in green, red countries have active compacts, blue countries have active threshold compacts, purple countries are in negotations for either, and pink countries have negotiated threshold agreements and are negotiating for full compacts The Millennium Challenge Account (MCA), run by the... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another with the intent of legally torturing them outside of the jurisdiction of a state which prohibits it. ...


The fraternity threatened a boycott of the 2007 film Stomp the Yard because of trademark infringements of fraternity paraphernalia. Alpha Phi Alpha also denounced the movie because it did not want to be associated with a film that juxtaposed gang membership with that of a Black Greek Letter Organization (BGLO). The fraternity rescinded its boycott decision when Sony Pictures and Screen Gems agreed to the removal of all references, in the film, to Alpha Phi Alpha.[45] Stomp the Yard is a 2007 drama film produced by Rainforest Films and released through Sony Pictures Screen Gems division on January 12, 2007. ... Trademark infringement is a violation of the exclusive rights attaching to a registered trademark without the authorisation of the trademark owner or any licensees (provided that such authorization was within the scope of the license). ... For other uses, see Gang (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


National programs

Alpha Phi Alpha asserts that through its community outreach initiatives, the fraternity supplies voice and vision to the struggle of African Americans, the African diaspora,[46] and the countless special problems that affect Black men.[16] A poster of African Reparation, Reconciliation and Restoration Conference The dispersion of Africans during and after the trans-Atlantic slave trade and others enroute to India as slaves and source of labor. ...

   ΑΦA National Programs[47]   
Mentoring World and National Affairs
Education Continuing the Legacy
Project Alpha Leadership Training Institute
Alpha Academy Go To High School, Go To College
Commission on Business A Voteless People is a Hopeless People
Alpha and the NAACP Alpha Head Start Academy
Cooperative Programs and Economic Development

The fraternity provides for charitable endeavors through its Education and Building Foundations, providing academic scholarships and shelter to underprivileged families.[4] The fraternity combines its efforts in conjunction with other philanthropic organizations such as Head Start, Boy Scouts of America, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America,[48] Project Alpha with the March of Dimes, NAACP, Habitat for Humanity, and Fortune 500 companies. Head Start is a program of the United States Department of Health and Human Services that focuses on assisting children from low-income families. ... March of Dimes official logo March of Dimes is the name of health charities in both the United States and Canada. ... Official Habitat for Humanity logo Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) (generally referred to as Habitat for Humanity or simply Habitat) is an international, ecumenical Christian, non-governmental, non-profit organization devoted to building simple, decent, and affordable housing. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...

We must not shoot in the air, but accomplish results. Each chapter must put its part of the program over with interest and drive.
Lucius L. McGee,
10th General President ΑΦA [49]

Alpha's "Designated Charity" benefits from the approximately $10,000, one-time contribution fund-raising efforts at the fraternity's annual general convention.[16] The Fraternity also has made commitments to train leaders with national mentoring programs.[4]


The Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation is a project of Alpha Phi Alpha to construct the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial.[50]


Go-To-High School, Go-To-College

Established in 1922, the Go-To-High School, Go-To-College program is intended to afford Alpha men with the opportunity to provide young participants with role models. The program concentrates on the importance of completing secondary and collegiate education as a path to advancement and to provide information and strategies to facilitate success.[51]


Voter Education/Registration Program

The "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People" campaign poster was produced in the 1930s to raise awareness of the voting problems that African-Americans faced.
The "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People" campaign poster was produced in the 1930s to raise awareness of the voting problems that African-Americans faced.

"A Voteless People is a Hopeless People" was initiated as a National Program of Alpha during the 1930s when many African-Americans had the right to vote but were prevented from voting because of poll taxes, threats of reprisal, and lack of education about the voting process. Voter education and registration has since remained a dominant focus in the fraternity's planning. In the 1990s the focus has shifted to promotion of political awareness and empowerment, delivered most often through use of town meetings and candidate forums.[52] Members are required to be registered voters, and to participate in the national voter registration program.[53] Image File history File links Seven_Architects. ... Image File history File links Seven_Architects. ...


The fraternity's Nu Mu Lambda chapter of Decatur, Georgia, held a voter registration drive in DeKalb County, Georgia in 2004, from which Georgia Secretary of State Cathy Cox, rejected all 63 voter registration applications on the basis that the fraternity did not follow correct procedures, including obtaining specific pre-clearance from the state to conduct their drive. For the south-western Georgia county, see Decatur County, Georgia. ... DeKalb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Cathy Cox Lera Catharine Cathy Cox (born 1958) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and the former Secretary of State of Georgia. ...

The Court finds and hereby DECLARES that the rejection of voter registration applications on the grounds that they were submitted in a bundle, or by someone who was not a registrar or deputy registrar, violates the NVRA.

—U.S. Court of Appeals, Wesley v. Cox.[54] The National Voter Registration Act of 1993, commonly known as Motor Voter, was signed into effect by President Clinton on May 20, 1993. ...

Nu Mu Lambda filed Charles H. Wesley Education Foundation v. Cathy Cox on the basis that the Georgia Secretary of State's long-standing policy and practice of rejecting mail-in voter registration applications that were submitted in bundles and/or by persons other than registrars, deputy registrars, or the individual applicants, violated the requirements of the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA) by undermining voter registration drives. A Senior U.S. District Judge upheld earlier federal court decisions in the case, which also found private entities have a right under the NVRA, to engage in organized voter registration activity in Georgia at times and locations of their choosing, without the presence or permission of state or local election officials.[55] The National Voter Registration Act of 1993, commonly known as Motor Voter, was signed into effect by President Clinton on May 20, 1993. ... A United States federal judge is a judge appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ...

Project Alpha

Alpha Phi Alpha and the March of Dimes began a collaborative program called Project Alpha in 1980. The project consists of a series of workshops and informational sessions conducted by Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity brothers to provide young men with current and accurate information about teen pregnancy prevention. Alpha Phi Alpha also participates in the March of Dimes WalkAmerica and raised over $95,000 in 2004.[56] Teenage pregnancy is defined as an underaged girl becoming pregnant with a baby. ...


Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

Location for the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. The project to create a memorial to Dr. King on the National Mall is being driven by Alpha Phi Alpha.

The campaign to erect a permanent memorial to Martin Luther King, Jr. is one of the most ambitious projects in the history of the fraternity.[50] In 1996, the United States Congress authorized with Public Law 104-333 and President Bill Clinton confirmed the fraternity's request to establish a foundation (The Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation) to manage the memorial's fundraising, design and construction.[50] The winning design for the Martin Luther King Jr. ... Image File history File links Washington_mlk_map. ... Image File history File links Washington_mlk_map. ... The winning design for the Martin Luther King Jr. ... Facing east across the Mall with ones back towards the Lincoln Memorial. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

Audio samples:
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial"
    Harry E. Johnson, President of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial, describes the architectural design of the memorial to Tavis Smiley of NPR.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial will be the first to honor an African American in the National Mall area, and King will be the second non-President to be commemorated in such a way. On December 4, 2000, Alpha Phi Alpha laid a marble and bronze plaque to dedicate the 4-acre memorial site that borders the Tidal Basin and within the sightline of the Jefferson Memorial and Lincoln Memorial. The Ceremonial Groundbreaking took place on November 13, 2006 and the fraternity's goal is to dedicate the memorial in 2008 to commemorate the 40th anniversary of King's death.[57] Image File history File links Martin_Luther_King,_Jr. ... Harry E. Johnson Harry E. Johnson (b. ... Tavis Smiley (born September 13, 1964 in Biloxi, Mississippi) is an American radio and television personality. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... Facing east across the Mall with ones back towards the Lincoln Memorial. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the basin in Washington, DC.. For other uses of the term, see Tidal Basin. ... The Jefferson Memorial from outside The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C. that is dedicated to Thomas Jefferson, an American Founding Father and the third president of the United States. ... The monument, which is on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential Memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... Groundbreaking is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Harry E. Johnson is the current President of the foundation and the 31st General President of Alpha Phi Alpha. The National Park Service will maintain the site. Harry E. Johnson Harry E. Johnson (b. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


Pan-Hellenic membership

Further information: National Pan-Hellenic Council, North-American Interfraternity Conference

The fraternity maintains dual membership in the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) and the North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC). The NPHC is composed of nine international black Greek-letter sororities and fraternities, and Alpha Phi Alpha is the only member founded at an Ivy League school. The council promotes interaction through forums, meetings, and other mediums for the exchange of information, and engages in cooperative programming and initiatives through various activities and functions.[58] The NIC serves to advocate the needs of its member fraternities through enrichment of the fraternity experience; advancement and growth of the fraternity community; and enhancement of the educational mission of the host institutions.[59] The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


Membership

The chief significance of Alpha Phi Alpha lies in its purpose to stimulate, develop, and cement an intelligent, trained leadership in the unending fight for freedom, equality and fraternity.
Our task is endless.
Henry A. Callis,
ΑΦA Founder
6th General President [60]

The fraternity's membership is predominantly African American in composition with brothers in over 680 college and graduate chapters in the United States, District of Columbia, the Caribbean, Bermuda, Europe, Asia and Africa.[61] A large percentage of leadership within the African American community in the 20th century originated from the ranks of Alpha Phi Alpha. Henry Arthur Callis Henry A. Callis b. ...


John A. Williams wrote in his book The King that God Did Not Save, which was a commentary of the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., that "a man clawing out his status does not stop at education. There are attendant titles he must earn. A fraternity is one of them."[44] King was initiated into the Sigma Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha while attending Boston University.[38] For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ...


The mystic of belonging to a Greek letter group still attracts college students in large numbers despite lawsuits that have threatened the very existence of some fraternities and sororities.[44]


Since its founding in 1906, more than 175,000 men have joined the ranks of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. A large percentage of leadership within the African American community in the 20th century originated from the ranks of Alpha Phi Alpha.[62]


Membership intake

ΑΦΑ Pledge Line of Sphinxmen, Cornell University.

The pledge period is the time that a pledge or potential new member of the fraternity engages in before being initiated as a member. This period is the time the pledge learns of the organization's history, principles and tenacity of brotherhood. Image File history File links Alphapledges. ... Image File history File links Alphapledges. ... Pledge is a verb, meaning to promise solemnly, and a noun, meaning the promise or its maker or its object. ...


An Alpha Phi Alpha Pledge is initially referred to as a "Sphinxman".


In the selection of candidates for membership, certain chapters had not escaped challenges of racial stereotyping and allegations of colorism. In a biography of Justice Thurgood Marshall, the authors recounted how certain chapters of the fraternity used a "brown paper bag test" and would not consider students whose skin color was darker than the bag.[63] General President Belford Lawson, Jr. lamented this attitude and condemned initiation practices of snobbery and exclusivity, and said "Jesus Christ could not make Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity today; they would blackball Him because He was not hot enough".[64] Colorism is a form of discrimination that is an international phenomenon, where human beings are accorded differing social and/or economic status and treatment based on skin color. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The blackball was used in elections to membership of a Gentlemens club (and similarly organised institutions, such as Freemasonry). ...

Let there be no complaints about brutality. The emphasis should be upon history and purposes of the Fraternity rather than upon physical punishment.
Rayford Logan,
15th General President ΑΦA [65]

There are periods in the history of the fraternity where hazing was involved in certain pledge lines. The fraternity has never condoned hazing, but has been aware of problems with "rushing" and "initiations" dated as far back as the 1934 General Convention when the fraternity founders communicated their concern with physical violence in initiation ceremonies.[66] At the 1940 General Convention, a pledge manual was discussed that would contain a brief general history, the list of chapters and locations, the achievements of Alpha men, outstanding Alpha men, and pledge procedures.[67] Rayford Wittingham Logan (January 7, 1897 - November 4, 1982) was an African American historian and Pan-African activist. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...

The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity pin with Greek letters, and seven pearls in recognition of the founders of the fraternity.
The Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity pin with Greek letters, and seven pearls in recognition of the founders of the fraternity.

Hazing is now against the law in many U.S. states; that and the objections of parents, students, and fraternity alumni have prompted Alpha Phi Alpha to implement its current policy abolishing pledging as a means of obtaining membership. The fraternity's official policy is that hazing is against the purposes and goals of the Fraternity and has been discontinued as a condition or manner of initiation into the membership of Alpha Phi Alpha. It is no longer legal within the organization for members to establish a pledge line or to require aspirants to the organization to submit to hazing. All membership intake activities for the fraternity are conducted by the National Intake Office and must occur in the presence of a National Intake Officer.[68] Image File history File links APhiA_Pin. ... Image File history File links APhiA_Pin. ... The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BCE. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel and consonant alike. ... Freshadama grade cultured freshwater pearls. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha member Hubert H. Humphrey was the 38th Vice President of the United States.
Alpha Phi Alpha member Hubert H. Humphrey was the 38th Vice President of the United States.

In 2001, the chapter at Ohio State University was suspended for two years by both the university and the national Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity for hazing and other violations. The incident involved two prospective members injured seriously enough to require medical care.[69] Image File history File links Official White House portrait of Humphrey. ... Image File history File links Official White House portrait of Humphrey. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducation public research university in the state of Ohio. ...


The fraternity currently only inducts members through an aspirant program, but in its history provided classifications for honorary and exalted honorary membership. Honorary members include Vice President Hubert Humphrey (who is Caucasian), jazz musician Duke Ellington, and activist W.E.B. DuBois.[70] Frederick Douglass is distinguished as the only member initiated posthumously when he became an exalted honorary member of the fraternity's Omega chapter in 1921.[71] This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... Frederick Douglass, ca. ...


Notable members

   Accomplishments by Alpha Phi Alpha Men
"First African American"[96]   
Dennis Archer President–American Bar Association
Richard Arrington MayorBirmingham, Alabama
Edward Brooke State Attorney General,
U.S. Senator since Reconstruction
Willie Brown Mayor–San Francisco, California
Emanuel Cleaver Mayor–Kansas City, Missouri
Edward R. Dudley Ambassador from the United States
E. Franklin Frazier President–American Sociological Association
Malvin Goode Reporter–American Broadcasting Company
Samuel Gravely Commandant of a U.S. Fleet
Charles Houston Editor–Harvard Law Review
Maynard Jackson Mayor–Atlanta, Georgia
John Johnson Forbes 400
Ernest Morial Mayor–New Orleans, Louisiana
Thurgood Marshall Justice–U.S. Supreme Court
Fritz Pollard Head coach–National Football League
Chuck Stone President–National Association of Black Journalists

As BGLOs became a firm part of African American culture and Alpha Phi Alpha expanded to over 175,000 members, the fraternity was eager to list those who claimed affiliation.[44] Alphas are members of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter organization established for African Americans. ... Former Mayor Dennis Archer Dennis Wayne Archer (born January 1, 1942 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former president of the American Bar Association, and was the first Black American to hold this office. ... American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ... Richard Arrington Jr. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State County Jefferson, Shelby Government  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (D) Area  - City  151. ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in... The State Attorney General in the United States is an executive office in all 50 US States that serves as the chief legal advisor to the state government and the chief law enforcement officer in the various states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Willie Lewis Brown, Jr. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... The Reverend Emanuel Cleaver II (born October 26, 1944) is a United Methodist pastor and a Democratic politician from the state of Missouri. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Edward R. Dudley (1911-2005) was the first African-American to hold the rank of Ambassador of the United States, serving as ambassador to Liberia (where he had been serving with the rank of minister) from 1949 through 1953. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... Dr. Edward Franklin Frazier (September 24, 1894 - May 17, 1962), was an American sociologist. ... The American Sociological Association (ASA), founded in 1905, is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the discipline and profession of sociology by serving sociologists in their work and promoting their contributions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Malvin Russell Goode. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Samuel Gravely, U.S. Navy photograph circa 1970. ... The United States Fleet was an organization in the United States Navy from 1922 until after World War II. Initially the abbreviation CINCUS, pronounced as sink us, was used for Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet, officially replaced by COMINCH in December 1941. ... Charles Hamilton Houston (September 3, 1895–April 22, 1950) was a black lawyer, Dean of Howard University Law School and NAACP Litigation Director who helped play a role in dismantling the Jim Crow laws and helped train future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall. ... The Harvard Law Review is a journal of legal scholarship published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... John H. Johnson, Chairman and CEO of Johnson Publishing Company John Harold Johnson (January 19, 1918 – August 8, 2005) was the founder of the Johnson Publishing Company, an international media and cosmetics empire headquartered in Chicago, Illinois that includes Ebony, and Jet magazines, Fashion Fair Cosmetics and EBONY Fashion Fair. ... The Forbes 400 or 400 Richest Americans (est. ... Ernest N. Morial as Mayor of New Orleans Ernest Nathan Morial (known as Dutch) (October 9, 1929 - December 24, 1989) was a U.S. political figure and a leading civil rights advocate. ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... Frederick Douglass Fritz Pollard (January 27, 1894 – May 11, 1986) was the first African American head coach in the National Football League (NFL). ... NFL redirects here. ... Chuck Stone (born 1924) is an American newspaper editor, columnist, and professor of journalism. ... The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), was founded in 1975 by 44 men and women in Washington, D.C. Headquartered at the University of Maryland, College Park and with 3300 members, it is the largest organization of journalists of color in the nation. ...


The fraternity's membership roster include activist Dick Gregory, Princeton Professor Cornel West, Congressman Charles B. Rangel, Department of Housing and Urban Development secretary Samuel Pierce, entrepreneur John Johnson, athlete Mike Powell, musician Donny Hathaway, United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, the first Premier of Bermuda Sir Edward T. Richards, and Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson.[72] Dick Gregory (1964) Richard Dick Claxton Gregory, (born October 12, 1932) is an African American comedian, social activist, writer, entrepreneur, and nutritionist. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a prominent African-American scholar and public intellectual. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Charles Bernard Rangel (born June 11, 1930) is an American politician. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... Samuel Riley Silent Sam Pierce, Jr. ... John H. Johnson, Chairman and CEO of Johnson Publishing Company John Harold Johnson (January 19, 1918 – August 8, 2005) was the founder of the Johnson Publishing Company, an international media and cosmetics empire headquartered in Chicago, Illinois that includes Ebony, and Jet magazines, Fashion Fair Cosmetics and EBONY Fashion Fair. ... Donny Hathaway (October 1, 1945 – January 13, 1979) was an American soul musician. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... List of Premiers of Bermuda Political Parties UBP - United Bermuda Party PLP - Progressive Labour Party See also Politics of Bermuda List of Governors of Bermuda British overseas territory Lists of incumbents Categories: Bermuda | Lists of office-holders ... Sir Edward Trenton Richards (born 1908, died 1991) was the first African-American to head the government of Bermuda and the first Premier of Bermuda. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ...


In the United States, among professional black males, the fraternity claims 60% of doctors, 75% of lawyers, 65% of dentists, and 95% of black colleges have or had Alpha Men as their president.[73]

Alpha Phi Alpha member W.E.B. Du Bois seated with college members of the Beta Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha at Howard University in 1932.
Alpha Phi Alpha member W.E.B. Du Bois seated with college members of the Beta Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha at Howard University in 1932.

Alpha men were instrumental in the founding and leadership of the NAACP (DuBois),[74] People's National Party (PNP) Norman Manley,[75] Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) (Jesse E. Moorland),[76] UNCF (Frederick D. Patterson),[77] and the SCLC (King, Walker and Jemison).[78] The National Urban League has had eight leaders in it almost 100 years of existence; Six of its leaders are Alpha men: George Haynes, Eugene Jones, Lester Granger, Whitney Young, Hugh Price and Marc Morial. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 427 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 547 pixel, file size: 105 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Picture is from the collection of Addison Spurlock, noted black Photographer and is on file at the Smithsonian. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 427 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 547 pixel, file size: 105 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Picture is from the collection of Addison Spurlock, noted black Photographer and is on file at the Smithsonian. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Beta is the second letter of the Greek alphabet (β). Beta may also refer to: In mathematics, statistics, and economics: Beta function in mathematics Beta distribution in statistics Beta coefficient in finance Standardized coefficient in statistics, also sometimes known as beta coefficient In physics: Beta-function in quantum field theory Beta... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. A historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... The Peoples National Party (PNP) is a democratic socialist Jamaican political party, founded by Norman Manley in 1938. ... The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is a non-profit organization founded in Chicago, Illinois, in 1915 as The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History by Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland. ... Jesse Moorland Jessee Edward Moorland (September 10, 1863 - 1939) was a Black minister, community executive, and civic leader. ... Frederick Douglass Patterson (October 10, 1901 - 1988), born in Washington D.C. and orphaned at the age of two. ... Wyatt Tee Walker (born 1929) was a United States black civil rights leader. ... Theodore Judson Jemison (born 1914), better known as T.J. Jemison, was President of the National Baptist Convention from 1982 to 1994. ... Lester Blackwell Granger (b. ... Hugh Bernard Price (born 1941) was a U.S. activist. ... Marc Haydel Morial (born January 3, 1958) is an American political and civic leader and former mayor of New Orleans. ...

We are counting on Alpha men to show their true colors.
Antonio M. Smith,
17th General President ΑΦA [79]

From the ranks of the fraternity have come a number of pioneers in various fields. Honorary member Kelly Miller was the first African-American to be admitted to Johns Hopkins University. Todd Duncan was the first actor to play "Porgy" in Porgy and Bess. During the Washington run of Porgy and Bess in 1936, the cast—as led by Todd Duncan—protested the audience's segregation. Duncan stated that he "would never play in a theater which barred him from purchasing tickets to certain seats because of his race." Eventually management would give into the demands and allow for the first integrated performance at National Theatre.[80] The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Robert Todd Duncan (1903-1998) was an American baritone. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ...


Charles Houston, a Harvard Law School graduate and a law professor at Howard University, first began a campaign in the 1930s to challenge racial discrimination in the federal courts. Houston's campaign to fight Jim Crow Laws began with Plessy v. Ferguson and culminated in a unanimous Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education. Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


Ron Dellums' campaign to end the racist, apartheid policies of South Africa succeeded when the House of Representatives passed Dellums' anti-apartheid legislation, The Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986, calling for a trade embargo against South Africa and immediate divestment by American corporations. President Ronald Reagan vetoed the bill; however, Congress' override of his veto was the first presidential foreign policy veto in the 20th century.[81] Ronald Vernie (Ron) Dellums (born November 24, 1935), U.S. Democratic Party politician, is the mayor of the City of Oakland, California. ... For the legal definition of apartheid, see the crime of apartheid. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... For delayed access after publication, see Embargo (academic publishing). ... “Reagan” redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha member Edward Brooke is congratulated by President George W. Bush at the Ceremony for the 2004 Recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, The East Room of the White House.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, awarded "to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between the nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses." The Presidential Medal of Freedom, designed to recognize individuals who have made "an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors", has been awarded to many members including William Coleman and Edward Brooke. The Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award of the United States Congress was awarded to Jesse Owens and Vice President Hubert Humphrey. The Spingarn Medal, awarded annually by the NAACP for outstanding achievement by a Black American, has been awarded to brothers John Hope Franklin, Rayford Logan and numerous fraternity members. Prime Minister Norman Manley was a Rhodes Scholar (1914), awarded annually by the Oxford based Rhodes Trust on the basis of academic achievement and character. Kurt Schmoke, Andrew Zawacki, and Westley Moore are other Rhodes Scholar recipients. Image File history File links EBrookePresHonor. ... Image File history File links EBrookePresHonor. ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... The East Room is one of the largest rooms in the White House, the home of the President of the United States. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Friendship is a term used to denote co-operative and supportive behavior between two or more humans. ... For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ... Look up Congress in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... William Thaddeus Coleman Jr (July 7, 1920 -) was the USAs fourth Secretary of Transportation and the second African American to serve in the Cabinet. ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ... The Spingarn Medal is awarded annually by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for outstanding achievement by a Black American. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Kurt L. Schmoke (born December 1, 1949) is a Democratic politician and was mayor of Baltimore, Maryland. ...

A portion of the Morial Convention Center Complex in New Orleans, namesake of Alpha Phi Alpha member Ernest Nathan Morial
A portion of the Morial Convention Center Complex in New Orleans, namesake of Alpha Phi Alpha member Ernest Nathan Morial

A number of buildings and monuments have been named after Alpha men such as the Eddie Robinson Stadium, Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, Whitney Young Memorial Bridge, and the W.E.B. DuBois library at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The United States Postal Service has honored fraternity members W.E.B. Dubois, Duke Ellington, Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Paul Robeson and Jesse Owens with a commemorative stamp in their popular Black Heritage Stamp series.[82] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1799 KB) View of part of w:Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1799 KB) View of part of w:Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans. ... NOLA redirects here. ... If a person, place, or thing is named after a different person, place, or thing, then one is said to be the namesake of the other. ... Ernest N. Morial as Mayor of New Orleans Ernest Nathan Morial (known as Dutch) (October 9, 1929 - December 24, 1989) was a U.S. political figure and a leading civil rights advocate. ... Eddie Robinson Stadium is a 19,600-seat multi-purpose stadium in Grambling, Louisiana. ... The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center is a collection of buildings in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... FAA diagram of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (IATA: ATL, ICAO: KATL, FAA LID: ATL), locally known as Atlanta Airport, Hartsfield Airport, Hartsfield-Jackson, or simply Hartsfield, is located seven miles (11 km) south of the central business district of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (IATA: BWI, ICAO: KBWI) serves the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area in the United States. ... The Whitney Young Memorial Bridge, otherwise known as the East Capitol Street Bridge, is a bridge that carries East Capitol Street across the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., U.S.A. It was renamed after civil rights activist Whitney Young in 1973. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... The Common Man featured in a commemorative golden postage stamp released by the Indian Postal Service on the 150th anniversary of the Times of India - 1988 A commemorative stamp is a postage stamp issued to honor or commemorate a place, event or person. ...


Egyptian symbolism

Further information: Panoramas of the Giza Plateau
Alpha Phi Alpha chose to use Egyptian symbology more representative of the members' African heritage. The Great Sphinx of Giza and Great Pyramids of Giza are fraternity icons.
Alpha Phi Alpha chose to use Egyptian symbology more representative of the members' African heritage. The Great Sphinx of Giza and Great Pyramids of Giza are fraternity icons.

Alpha Phi Alpha utilizes motifs from Ancient Egypt and uses images and songs depicting the Her-em-akhet (Great Sphinx of Giza), pharaohs, and other Egyptian artifacts to represent the organization. This is in contrast to other fraternities that traditionally echo themes from the golden age of Ancient Greece. Alpha's constant reference to Ethiopia in hymns and poems are further examples of Alpha's mission to imbue itself with an African cultural heritage. Fraternity brother Charles H. Wesley wrote, "To the Alpha Phi Alpha brotherhood, African history and civilization, the Sphinx, and Ethiopian tradition bring new meanings and these are interpreted with new significance to others. The Great Pyramids of Giza, symbols of foundation, sacred geometry and more, are other African images chosen by Alpha Phi Alpha as fraternity icons.[83] Pharaoh often appears and is a title used to refer to the Egyptian god-kings. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 988 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 988 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... , The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza is a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... 19th-century tourists in front of the Sphinx - view from South-East, Great Pyramid in background Giza pyramids, view from south in late 19th century. ... , The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza is a large half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around nine hundred years. ... 19th-century tourists in front of the Sphinx - view from South-East, Great Pyramid in background Giza pyramids, view from south in late 19th century. ... A God-king is a monarch who is held in a special religious significance by his subjects. ...

I have stood beside the Sphinx in Egypt in Africa in July on my third visit there, and I brought greetings to this silent historical figure in the name of Alpha Phi Alpha and I crossed the continent to Ethiopia.
Charles H. Wesley,
14th General President ΑΦA [84]

The fraternity's 21st General President, Thomas W. Cole said, "Alpha Phi Alpha must go back to her ultimate roots; only then can she be nurtured to full bloom."[85] Fraternity members organize travel to Egypt to walk across the sands of the Giza Plateau (coordinates 29°58′33″N, 31°07′49″E) to the Great Sphinx of Giza and the Great Pyramids of Giza. Chares H. Wesley Charles Harris Wesley (December 2, 1891 - August 16, 1987) was an noted African American historian, educator, writer and author. ...


Centennial celebration

Alpha Phi Alpha General Presidents at centennial memorial site, Cornell University campus.

Alpha Phi Alpha declared 2006 the beginning of its "Centennial Era" as it readied for its Centenary, framed by the slogan First of All, Servants of All, We Shall Transcend All. These preparations consisted of nationwide activities and events, including the commissioning of intellectual and scholarly works, presentation of exhibits, lectures, artwork and musical expositions, the production of film and video presentations and a Centennial Convention July 25–30, 2006, in Washington, D.C. Image File history File links APhiA_Cornell_007. ... Image File history File links APhiA_Cornell_007. ... A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The 2006 Centennial Celebration Kickoff launched with a "pilgrimage" to Cornell University on November 19, 2005. That event brought over 700 fraternity members who gathered for a day long program. Members journeyed across campus and unveiled a new centennial memorial to Alpha Phi Alpha. The memorial—a wall in the form of a "J" in recognition of the Jewels—features a bench and a plaque and is situated in front of the university's Barnes Hall.[35] is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The members of Alpha Phi Alpha who made a pilgrimage to Cornell gather with Cornell faculty and staff for the 2005 Academic Convocation, Cornell University–Sage Chapel, Ithaca, New York.

Alpha Phi Alpha Men: A Century of Leadership, is a historical documentary on Alpha Phi Alpha's century of leadership and service. The film premiered February 2006 on PBS[15] as part of the 2006 Black History Month theme, "Celebrating Community: A Tribute to Black Fraternal, Social and Civic Institutions."[86] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... “PBS” redirects here. ... Black History Month is a remembrance of important people and events in African American history. ...

Mr. Speaker, it is an honor and special privilege to address this great body on such an auspicious occasion. As a proud member of this fraternity, I feel special esteem in joining the entire House to recognize the historical significance of the centennial anniversary of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.
David Scott [87]

The Centennial Convention, called Reflects on Rich Past, Looks Toward Bright Future, began on Capitol Hill with Congressman and fraternity member David Scott stating to the House of Representatives; "this week men from every discipline and geographic location convene to chart and plan for the fraternity’s future, celebrate its 100th anniversary, and reinvigorate its founding principles of scholarship, fellowship, good character, and the uplifting of humanity." The House of Representatives passed House Concurrent Resolution 384, approved 422-0, which recognized and honored Alpha Phi Alpha as the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African Americans, its accomplishments and its historic milestone.[87] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha members were among the list of some of the 600 expected guests of lawmakers, prominent black leaders and civil rights veterans on the South Lawn of the White House as President George W. Bush talked about the reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act.

The resolution was co-sponsored by the eight members of the House of Representatives who are members of Alpha Phi Alpha which included Emanuel Cleaver, Robert Scott and Chaka Fattah. While in Washington, fraternity members such as National Urban League head Marc Morial and Congressman Gregory Meeks witnessed the renewal of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by President George W. Bush in a signing ceremony at the White House. A tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. with an hour-long reflection at the site of the King Memorial was witnessed by Alpha's General President(s) and a host of the fraternity members assembled for the convention. Grammy Award winning singer Lionel Richie gave a performance for his fraternity at the John F. Kennedy Center.[88] Image File history File linksMetadata BUSHFULLWH.jpg‎ http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata BUSHFULLWH.jpg‎ http://www. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. Â§ 1973-1973aa-6)[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50... The Reverend Emanuel Cleaver II (born October 26, 1944) is a United Methodist pastor and a Democratic politician from the state of Missouri. ... Robert Cortez Bobby Scott (born April 30, 1947) is a Democratic politician from the Commonwealth of Virginia, currently representing the states 3rd Congressional district in the United States House of Representatives. ... Chaka Fattah, born Arthur Davenport (21 November 1956 in Philadelphia), has served as a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1994, representing the 2nd congressional district of Pennsylvania (map), which includes North Philadelphia, West Philadelphia, a very small portion of Northeast Philadelphia and Cheltenham Township in... Gregory Weldon Meeks (born September 25, 1953), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the Sixth Congressional District of New York (map), which includes most of Southeastern Queens including Jamaica, Laurelton, Rosedale, Saint Albans, Springfield Gardens, and Far Rockaway, as... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. Â§ 1973-1973aa-6)[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ...


The House of Alpha, The Centennial Exhibit of Alpha Phi Alpha, opened its doors at the convention. Skip Mason served as curator of the exhibit which has been described as a "fraternal masterpiece." The featured materials are part of the records of Alpha Phi Alpha, local chapters and the personal collection of fraternity members.[89] A curator of a cultural heritage institution (e. ...


Black college Greek movement

The cover of The History of Alpha Phi Alpha.

The first successful attempt in founding a collegiate Black Greek letter Organization (BGLO) by African Americans is accomplished in 1906 by 7 college students (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity) on the white college campus of Cornell University.[83] Alpha Phi Alpha is also the first Greek letter organization established at a historically black college in 1907 at Howard University. Image File history File links Alphahistorybook. ... Image File history File links Alphahistorybook. ...


Alpha Kappa Alpha was founded in 1908 at Howard as the first among African-American sororities and among BGLOs founded at a black college.[90] Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is Americas first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by Black college women. ...


BGLOs may have begun in the year 1903 on the Indiana University Bloomington campus, but there were too few registrants to assure continuing organization. In that year a club was formed called Alpha Kappa Nu Greek Club to "strengthen the black's voice", but the club disappeared after a short time. There is no record of any similar organization at Indiana University until Kappa Alpha Nu (now Kappa Alpha Psi) was issued a charter in 1911.[91] Two of the founders of Kappa Alpha Psi had prior interaction with Alpha Phi Alpha and its Beta chapter while students at Howard University before transferring to Indiana University.[92] Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ...


The other BGLOs to come in succession with four additional being founded at Howard University, namely, Omega Psi Phi (1911), Delta Sigma Theta (1913), Phi Beta Sigma (1914) and Zeta Phi Beta (1920). Sigma Gamma Rho (1922) and Iota Phi Theta (1963) were founded at Butler University and Morgan State University respectively.[93] The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) was founded on a cool Friday evening, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three undergraduate students and one faculty advisor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Morgan State University, formerly Centenary Biblical Institute (1867-1890), Morgan College (1890 -1975), is located in residential Baltimore, Maryland. ...

First of All, Servants of All,
We Shall Transcend All
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Motto

Alpha Phi Alpha holds the historic position as the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity in the United States established for people of African descent, and the paragon for the remaining BGLOs to follow.[83] Historian Charles H. Wesley, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha, authored The History of Alpha Phi Alpha, A Development in College Life and asserts that Alpha Phi Alpha was the first Greek-letter organization among black college students.[94] The history books of Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi and Phi Beta Sigma omit the fraternity's place and contribution to the college Negro fraternal movement. Historian and Alpha archivist Herman Mason has stated, "As a historian who recognizes that laying a foundation for any period of history, I find their omission inexcusable and without merit."[92] A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ...


Documentary films

  • Alpha Phi Alpha Men: A Century of Leadership , 2006, Producer/Directors: Alamerica Bank/Rubicon Productions

References

  • Mason, Herman "Skip" [1997] (1999). The Talented Tenth: The Founders and Presidents of Alpha, 2nd edition, Four-G Publishers. ISBN 1-885066-63-5. 
  • Wesley, Charles H. [1929] (1981). The History of Alpha Phi Alpha, A Development in College Life, 14th edition, Foundation Publishers. ASIN: B000ESQ14W. 
  • Wesley, Charles H. [1929] (1950). The History of Alpha Phi Alpha: A Development in Negro College Life, 6th edition, Foundation Publishers. 

Chares H. Wesley Charles Harris Wesley (December 2, 1891 - August 16, 1987) was an noted African American historian, educator, writer and author. ...

Footnotes

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  1. ^ a b Wesley 1981, op. cit., pp. 15–16.
  2. ^ a b Wesley 1981, op. cit., pp. 19–27.
  3. ^ Wesley 1981, op. cit., pp.26–31, 92.
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  6. ^ Preservation of Alpha Phi Alpha History. Education Online. Retrieved on 2006-04-26.
  7. ^ a b History of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Epsilon Theta Chapter. Retrieved on 2006-04-05.
  8. ^ ΑΦA First General Convention. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Gamma Chapter. Retrieved on 2006-04-03.
  9. ^ a b c d Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Alpha Phi Alpha Men: "A Century of Leadership'' [Video]. Rubicon Productions.
  10. ^ District of Columiba Organization Information. dcra.dc.gov. Retrieved on 2006-08-15.
  11. ^ ΑΦΑ:A Brief History. rmc.library.cornell.edu. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  12. ^ Opportunity Journal. nul.org. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  13. ^ Alpha Phi Alpha and the Great War. rmc.library.cornell.edu. Retrieved on 2006-04-26.
  14. ^ Fort Des Moines Museum & Education Center. fortdesmoines.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  15. ^ a b c Alpha Phi Alpha Men: A Century of Leadership. Maryland Public Television. Retrieved on 2006-04-26.
  16. ^ a b c d e "Α legacy of leadership and service - Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity - Part 2", Ebony, 1989-11. Retrieved on 2006-07-21. 
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  33. ^ The Founders of Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ ) — (Seven Jewels). alphaphialpha.net. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
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  35. ^ a b D'Andrea, Theresa. "ΑΦΑ Centennial Pilgrimage to Cornell University", ChronicleOnline, Cornell News Service, 2005-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-06-12. 
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  38. ^ a b Martin Luther King, Jr.. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Eta Lambda Chapter. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  39. ^ Gray, Butler T.. "National Mall Site Chosen for Memorial to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.", black-collegian.com. Retrieved on 2006-04-03. 
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  42. ^ H.B. 104-190. thomas.gov, A Bill to authorize the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity to establish a memorial in the District of Columbia to the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.. Retrieved on 2006-04-03.
  43. ^ Anamelechi, Anthony. "Alpha Phi Alpha Plans Action on Black Male Issues", Black College Wire, Black College Communication Association, 2006-08-30. Retrieved on 2006-11-19. 
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  58. ^ National Pan-Hellenic Council Homepage. NPHC. Retrieved on 2006-04-26.
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  74. ^ See, e.g., Niagara Movement.
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  78. ^ The Southern Christian Leadership Coference. SCLC. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
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  80. ^ Porgy and Bess: Today in History, September 2. Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2006-04-26.
  81. ^ Norment, Lynn. "How African-Americans helped free South Africa - Special Issue: Nelson Mandela and the New South Africa", Ebony, Johnson Publishing, 1994-08. Retrieved on 2006-07-21. 
  82. ^ USPS Black Heritage Stamp series. United States Postal Service. Retrieved on 2006-04-05. (archive)
  83. ^ a b c Black sponsored Greek letter organization. Alphi Phi Alpha Fraternity, Mu Nu Chapter. Retrieved on 2007-04-21.
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  86. ^ The 2006 Black History Theme. Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Retrieved on 2006-04-08.
  87. ^ a b Congressman Scott Honors Centennial Anniversary of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.,. davidscott.house.gov. This is a House Concurrent Resolution. A concurrent resolution is a legislative proposal that must be passed by the House and Senate but does not require the signature of the President and does not have the force of law. Concurrent resolutions are generally used to express the sentiment of Congress or to amend the internal rules of the House and Senate. Retrieved on 2007-01-04.
  88. ^ "Alpha Phi Alpha Celebrates 100 Years at Annual Convention in D.C.", Jet, Johnson Publishing, 2006-08-28, pp. 20–22. 
  89. ^ Centennial Exhibition of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Committee To Elect Herman "Skip" Mason, Jr.. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  90. ^ NPHC Archive Photo Society. Retrieved on 2006-12-22.
  91. ^ The History of Kappa Alpha Psi. Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Germantown Alumni Chapter. Retrieved on 2006-04-26.
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  96. ^ First by Alpha Men [2]. April 14, 2006.

Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Atlantic slave trade was the trade of African slaves by Europeans that occurred in and around the Atlantic Ocean. ... The word Maafa (also known as the African Holocaust or Holocaust of Enslavement) is derived from a Kiswahili word meaning disaster, terrible occurrence or great tragedy. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Military history of African Americans is that of African Americans in the United States since the arrival of the first black slaves in 1619 to the present day. ... The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. ... For the automotive term, see redline. ... See also: American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all Americans. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... Reparations for slavery is a movement in the United States, which suggests that the government apologize to slave descendants for their hardships, and bestow on them reparations, whether it be in the form of money, land, or other goods. ... In the United States, African American culture or Black culture includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Kwanzaa (or Kwaanza) is a week-long Pan-African festival primarily honoring African-American heritage. ... African American art is a broad term describing the visual arts of the American black community. ... African American dances in the vernacular tradition (academically known as African American vernacular dance) are those dances which have developed within African American communities in everyday spaces, rather than in dance studios, schools or companies. ... The Color Purple by Alice Walker African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ... The term black church refers to Christian churches that minister to the African American community. ... The Black Buddhist Community in America is historically the first and only organization to propagate Buddhism specifically among persons of black or African descent in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Nation of Islam (NOI) is a religious and social/political organization founded in the United States by Wallace Fard Muhammad in 1930 with the self-proclaimed goal of resurrecting the spiritual, mental, social, and economic condition of the black men and women of America and the rest of the... Black Jew generally refers to people who are both Black and Jewish. ... Black Hebrew Israelites (also Black Hebrews, African Hebrew Israelites, and Hebrew Israelites) are groups of people of African ancestry situated mostly in the United States who claim to be descendants of the ancient Israelites. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Voodoo redirects here. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Santeria (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Black supremacy is a racist[1] ideology which holds that black people are superior to other people and is most often thought of in connection with anti-white racism, anti-Semitism and bigotry towards non-black people. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Tommie Smith (gold medal) and John Carlos (bronze medal) famously performed the Black Power salute on the 200 m winners podium at the 1968 Olympics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Black Capitalism is a name for a movement among African Americans to build wealth through the ownership and development of businesses. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was an African American organization founded to promote civil rights and self-defense. ... Pan-African people are all people with African physical features. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... “CORE” redirects here. ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... National Urban League Logo The National Urban League (NUL) is a nonpartisan civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States. ... The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is a non-profit organization founded in Chicago, Illinois, in 1915 as The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History by Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ... National Black Chamber of Commerce The National Black Chamber of Commerce, (NBCC), was “incorporated in March of 1993, in Washington D.C.” The organizations mission is “To economically empower and sustain African American communities, through the process of entrepreneurship and capitalistic activity within the United States and via interaction with... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The Links, Incorporated is an exclusive non-profit organization based upon the ideals of combining friendship and community service and was was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 9, 1946, from a group of ladies known as the Philadelphia Club to have focuses on civic, cultural, and educational endeavors[1... Bud Fowler, the first professional black baseball player with one of his teams, Western of Keokuk, Iowa The Negro Leagues were American professional baseball leagues comprising predominantly African-American teams. ... The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... logo of Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) is a College athletic conference consisting of historically black colleges located in the southern United States. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Notable African-American or Black people, other than Black Caribbeans. ... This is a list of landmark legislation, court decisions, executive orders, and proclamations in the United States significantly affecting African Americans. ... This is an alphabetical list of African-American-related topics: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A African American African American contemporary issues African American culture... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Academy Award winners Denzel Washington, Halle Berry, and Jamie Foxx on the 60th anniversary cover of Ebony Magazine, November 2005 Ebony, a magazine for the African American market, was founded by John H. Johnson and has been published since the autumn of 1945. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Youie Woodruff (born July 5, 1915 in Connellsville, Pennsylvania) is a former American athlete, winner of 800 m at the 1936 Summer Olympics. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A press release (sometimes known as a news release or press statement) is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Academy Award winners Denzel Washington, Halle Berry, and Jamie Foxx on the 60th anniversary cover of Ebony Magazine, November 2005 Ebony, a magazine for the African American market, was founded by John H. Johnson and has been published since the autumn of 1945. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Alpha Phi Alpha

Alpha Phi Alpha Images “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

External Websites

  • Alpha Phi Alpha Songs, Poems, and Quotes
  • Alpha Phi Alpha Homes
  • Alpha Phi Alpha: A Centennial Celebration, Cornell University
  • Alpha Phi Alpha Politicians
  • Skip's Historical Moments
  • Fort Des Moines Museum
  • Charles H. Wesley Education Foundation v. Cathy Cox.
  • Public Law 104-333 Congressional authorization for Memorial to Dr. King DOC
  • H. Con. Res. 384: Recognizing and honoring the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Alpha Phi Alpha FraternityPDF (31.2 KiB)
  • Cairo/Giza travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Alpha Phi Alpha at the Open Directory Project

Alpha Phi Alpha "A Century of Leadership" PBS Video Image File history File links Noia_64_mimetypes_wordprocessing. ... In computing, DOC or doc (an abbreviation of document) is a file extension for word processing documents; most commonly for Microsoft Word. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

  • A Century of Leadership—Part 1 of 7 at YouTube (16:03 mins)
  • A Century of Leadership—Part 2 of 7 at YouTube (17:25 mins)
  • A Century of Leadership—Part 3 of 7 at YouTube (17:52 mins)
  • A Century of Leadership—Part 4 of 7 at YouTube (17:56 mins)
  • A Century of Leadership—Part 5 of 7 at YouTube (18:25 mins)
  • A Century of Leadership—Part 6 of 7 at YouTube (15:21 mins)
  • A Century of Leadership—Part 7 of 7 at YouTube (7:06 mins)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alpha Delta Phi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1608 words)
Alpha Delta Phi (ΑΔΦ) is a Greek-letter fraternity in the United States and Canada.
Alpha Delta Phi was a charter member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Council) (NIC), and a member of Alpha Delta Phi, Hamilton W. Mabie (Williams College, class of 1867), was the first President of the NIC.
The Fraternity is a retronym used now to distinguish the all-male Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity (aka the Alpha Delta Phi International) from the co-ed Alpha Delta Phi Society.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

mr. Michael WARREN
21st May 2010
I RETURN TO TROY TO ADCHIEVE MY BS DEGREE. I JUST GRADUATED WITH THE CLASS 05/17/2010. I HAVE TWO YOUNGER BROTHERS THAT ARE ALPHAS. NOW I AM 51YRS. I WOULD LIKE TO BECOME A MEMBER. WHAT IS THE PROCEDURE ? MWRRN13@MSN.COM

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