FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
(ΑΕΠ)
Founded November 7, 1913 (1913-11-07) (age 94)
New York University
Type Social
Emphasis Jewish
Motto No one could tell me where my soul might be; I searched for God, but He eluded me; I sought my brother out and found all three. - Poet Howard Crosby
Colors Gold & Blue
Symbol Lion
Flower Fleur-de-lis
Philanthropy Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Chai Lifeline’s Camp Simcha, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum[1]
Chapters 136 chapters and colonies [2]
Members Over 82,000 [3] currently
lifetime
Free label ΑΕΠ, AEPi, Pies, Apes
Headquarters 8815 Wesleyan Road
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Homepage www.aepi.org

Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. Alpha Epsilon Pi is a Jewish fraternity, though non-discriminatory and open to all who are willing to espouse its purpose and values. is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the colour. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... The Shaarei Tzedek Medical Center (‎, Merkaz Refui Shaarei Tzedek), or SZMC, is a major research hospital located in the Beit VeGan neighborhood of Jerusalem, Israel. ... Interior of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Exterior of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum viewed from Raoul Wallenberg Place (15th St. ... A colony is a probationary member of a national fraternity. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... North American redirects here. ...

Contents

Mission statement[4]

Alpha Epsilon Pi, the Jewish Fraternity of North America, was founded to provide opportunities for Jewish men seeking the best possible college and fraternity experience. We have maintained the integrity of our purpose by strengthening our ties to the Jewish community and serving as a link between high school and career. Alpha Epsilon Pi develops leadership for the North American Jewish community at a critical time in a young man's life.


Chapter Mission Statement: The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...

Alpha Epsilon Pi’s role is to encourage the Jewish student to remain dedicated to Jewish ideals, values, and ethics and to prepare the student to be one of tomorrow’s leaders so that he may help himself, his family, his community, and his people.

History

AEPi was founded in 1913 under the arch at New York University (NYU) by Charles C. Moskowitz and 10 other Jewish men: David K. Schafer, Isador M. Glazer, Herman L. Kraus, Arthur E. Leopold, Benjamin M. Meyer, Arthur M. Lipkint, Charles J. Pintel, Maurice Plager, Emil Lustgarten, and Hyman Shulman. Their first pledge was Samuel L. Epstein. Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ...


Charles C. Moskowitz was a basketball player and had just transferred to New York University’s School of Commerce from the City College of New York. Several fraternities at the School of Commerce expressed interest in him and one gave him a bid. The name of that fraternity is unknown. When Charles asked if his close Jewish friends could join as well, he was told that the invitation was for him alone. At this point, the group of 11 men began meeting regularly in the German rathskellar. Official school recognition of AEPi was granted on November 7. This article is about the sport. ... “City College” redirects here. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The founding members always intended for AEPi to be a national fraternity. Long before the second chapter, the NYU group was designated "Alpha Chapter." In 1917, the local fraternity Phi Tau at Cornell University became the Beta Chapter of AEPi. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Cornell redirects here. ...


[5]


Coat of arms

The coat of arms of Alpha Epsilon Pi, while capable of being described through a traditional blazon, contains a number of symbolic objects, the true meaning of which is only revealed to new members (pledges) during their initiation into the fraternity. This is an article about Heraldry. ...


Chapter organization

AEPi has specific titles that are used for its officers, many correspond to Fraternal tradition.

  • President - Master
  • Vice President - Lieutenant Master
  • Secretary - Scribe
  • Treasurer - Exchequer
  • Sergeant at Arms - Sentinel

National organization structure

AEPi is governed in a diamond model[6]. It consists of the AEPi Foundation, The Fiscal Control Board, the Executive Office and the Supreme Board of Governors.


The AEPi Foundation is the charitable arm of the organization. It directs the philanthropic affairs of the fraternity, supports projects of a Jewish and fraternal nature, and provides support for the individual chapters and colonies. They work very closely with the Director of Jewish Programming.


The Fiscal Control Board (FCB) is responsible for the financial well-being of the organization. It oversees the financial decisions of the apparatus, and makes recommendations to the Supreme Board of Governors. Each member of the FCB is also on the Board of Directors of the AEPi Foundation.


The Executive Office is made up of the professional staff that oversees the day to day functions of the fraternity. The staff consists of the housing coordinator, the leadership consultants, the Director of Jewish Programming, and the Executive Director.


The Supreme Board of Governors is made up of 11 positions, the Supreme Master (President), Supreme Master Elect (President-Elect/VP), Supreme Scribe (Secretary), Supreme Exchequer (Treasurer), Supreme Sentinel (Sergeant at Arms), and four alumni members, styled Supreme Governors, as well as two undergraduate representative, styled, Undergraduate Supreme Governors. The Board of Governors makes the majority of decisions for the fraternity's well-being and meets semi-annually to discuss matters of importance, including the granting of charters.


Notable alumni

  • Newton Becker, Kent State 1952 - Founder, Becker CPA Review Course
  • Rabbi Stanley Davids, Case Western 1961 - President of Association of Reform Zionists of America (ARZA)
  • Sheldon Good, Illinois 1955 - International Realtor, Former World President of FIBICA
  • Sanford Grossman, Alabama 1957 - Director of NFL telecasts for CBS and now FOX
  • David Horowitz, Bradley 1959 - Television Personality/Consumer Advocate
  • Allan Jaffe, Pennsylvania 1957 - Family Owner of New Orleans' Preservation Hall (Deceased)
  • Allyn Kilsheimer - George Washington 1963 - Structural Engineer who orchestrated the rebuiling of the Pentagon after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks
  • Ron Klein, Ohio State 1979 - Congressman, U.S. House of Representatives (D-FL-22nd)[citation needed]
  • Martin Leaf, Illinois 1947 - Family Owner, Founder, Leaf Candies and Donruss Baseball Cards
  • Howard Lorber, C.W. Post 1970 - CEO/President, Nathan's Famous and Vector Group
  • David Markin, Brandley 1953 - Former Chairman of The U.S. Tennis Association
  • Perry Mendel, Emory 1943 - Founder, Kinder Care Day Care Centers
  • Charles C. Moskowitz, NYU 1914 - Former President/Treasurer, MGM Studios (Deceased)
  • Louis Nizer, Columbia - Lawyer, Novelist (deceased)
  • Michael Politz, American 1990 - Media Conglomerate Owner and National Television Host, owner of Food & Beverage Magazine[citation needed]
  • Alan Schulman, NYU 1955 - Retired CEO/Chair of Board, Ecolab, Inc.
  • Rabbi Levi Shemtov - Director of Chabad, Washington, D.C.
  • Fred Silverman, Syracuse 1958 - Independent Producer, Former President NBC Television
  • Walter Winchell, Miami - Early Gossip Columnist/Radio Personality (Deceased)
  • Sam Zell, Michigan 1963 - Real-estate entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman of Equity International, a real-estate private equity firm, owner of the Chicago Tribune

Irving Azoff is a famous music industry manager of bands such as Jewel, The Eagles, Bush, REO Speedwagon, Dan Fogelberg, Seal, Journey, Christina Aguilera, Van Halen and Steely Dan. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by MCA Inc. ... Herbert Baum (* 10 February 1912 in Poznan † 11 June 1942 in Berlin) was a German-Jewish resistance leader against National Socialism. ... Drake University is a private, co-educational university located in the city of Des Moines, Iowa. ... Bedrick with Rudy Guiliani Jason Bedrick (born June 5, 1983) is a member of the New Hampshire state legislature. ... Babson College, located in Wellesley, Massachusetts (zoned as Babson Park, ZIP code 02457),[1] is a private business school which grants all undergraduates a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate (upper) House of Representatives (lower) President Sylvia Larsen, Democrat since December 6, 2006 Speaker Terie Norelli, Democrat since December 6, 2006 Members Senate: 24 House of Representatives: 400 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Meeting place New Hampshire State House Web site http://www. ... This article is about the university in Ottawa, Ontario. ... Kent State University (KSU) is an institution of higher learning located in Kent, Ohio, which is 1 hour south-east from Cleveland. ... Gary Bruce Bettman (born on June 2, 1952 in Queens, New York) is the commissioner of the National Hockey League (NHL), a post he has held since February 1, 1993. ... Cornell is the name of some places in the United States of America. ... NHL redirects here. ... Wolf Blitzer (born March 22, 1948 in Buffalo, New York) is an American journalist and author. ... University at Buffalo The University at Buffalo, formerly known as the State University of New York at Buffalo, is located in Buffalo, New York, USA, and is one of the four university centers operated by the State University of New York. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... NCAA President Dr. Myles Brand Myles Brand (May 17, 1942 - ) is president of the United States National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and prior to that served as the sixteenth president of Indiana University. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a nonsectarian, coeducational private research university in Troy, New York, a city lying just outside the state capital of Albany. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is a three-time Academy Award, nineteen-time Emmy and Golden Globe-winning American producer, writer, and film director. ... New York University (NYU) is a large research-oriented university in New York City, and is among the most prestigious post-secondary institutions in the United States. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... An Emmy Award. ... Ken Chertow is an American Olympian wrestler. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... The term child actor is generally applied to a child acting in motion pictures or television, but also to an adult who began his or her acting career as a child; to avoid confusion the latter is also called a former child actor. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. It was formed in 1967 by the federation of Case Institute of Technology (founded in 1880 by philanthropist Leonard Case Jr. ... This article is about the university in Ottawa, Ontario. ... Ian Eagle is an American sports announcer calling National Football League (NFL) games on CBS, New Jersey Nets games on the YES Network and hosts Full Court Press, a basketball talk show with former player Kenny Smith on Sirius Satellite Radio. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life (Hillel International) is the largest Jewish campus organization in the world. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... Disney redirects here. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... NBC Nightly News is the flagship evening news program for NBC News and broadcasts from the GE Building, Rockefeller Center in New York City. ... Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing (1980) Arthur Ira Garfunkel (born November 5, 1941) is an American white gollywog and actor, best known as half of the folk duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, along the Nervión River in downtown Bilbao, with the Maman, a huge spider by Louise Bourgeois The Guggenheim museum in Bilbao, Spain, which is made of glass, titanium, and limestone. ... Leonard J. Goldberg (born January 24, 1934 in New York) is an American film producer and television producer. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Nathaniel L. Goldstein (June 9, 1896—March 24, 1981) was New York State Attorney General from January 1943 to January 1955, paralleling the three terms of Governor Thomas E. Dewey. ... New York University (NYU) is a large research-oriented university in New York City, and is among the most prestigious post-secondary institutions in the United States. ... This article is about the state. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article is about the animal. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania is a business school at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. The school was founded by Joseph Wharton, who also was one of the founders of Swarthmore College (founded in 1864), in 1881 as the first collegiate business school in the United States. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Washington University redirects here. ... Category: ... The Association of Trial Lawyers of America, or ATLA, is the leading organization for lawyers representing plaintiffs in the United States. ... Bradley University is a private, co-educational university located in Peoria, Illinois ( , , ). It is a medium sized institution with an enrollment of approximately 6,100 undergraduate and postgraduate students. ... H. Robert Horvitz is an American biologist best known for his research on the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Richard M. Joel (born 1950) is the fourth president of Yeshiva University, a Modern Orthodox Judaism Jewish university with a network of schools, colleges, and universities in New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a large research-oriented university in New York City, and is among the most prestigious post-secondary institutions in the United States. ... Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life (Hillel International) is the largest Jewish campus organization in the world. ... Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... Ronald Ron Klein (born July 10, 1957) is an American politican from the U.S. state of Florida. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... Donruss is a U.S. brand of bubble gum and trading card. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) is a U.S. organization founded in 1950 which combats muscular dystrophy and diseases of the nervous system and muscular system in general by funding research, providing medical and community services, and educating health professionals and the general public. ... Richard Lewis Richard Philip Lewis (born June 29, 1947) is an American comedian and actor. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The original Nathans Nathans Famous is a chain of U.S.-based fast food restaurants specializing in hot dogs. ... Bernard Marcus (born 1929 in Newark, New Jersey) is a co-founder of Home Depot. ... Rutgers redirects here. ... The Home Depot (NYSE: HD) is an American retailer of home improvement and construction products and services. ... Bradley University is a private, co-educational university located in Peoria, Illinois ( , , ). It is a medium sized institution with an enrollment of approximately 6,100 undergraduate and postgraduate students. ... Emory may refer to: Emory, Texas Emory University Emory and Henry College David Emory (anti-fascist researcher) John Emory (protestant bishop) Emory Upton (American general) Category: ... New York University (NYU) is a large research-oriented university in New York City, and is among the most prestigious post-secondary institutions in the United States. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Jerrold Lewis Nadler, sometimes called Jerry Nadler (born June 13, 1947) is an American politician from New York City. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Map New Yorks Eighth Congressional District district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City. ... Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator and journalist. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Jerry Reinsdorf (born February 25, 1936 in Brooklyn, New York) is the owner of Chicago White Sox and the Chicago Bulls. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... The Chicago Bulls are a professional basketball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) (Chicago) White Stockings (1901-1903 *From 1900 to 1903, the official name did not contain the city name of Chicago... Bradley University is a private, co-educational university located in Peoria, Illinois ( , , ). It is a medium sized institution with an enrollment of approximately 6,100 undergraduate and postgraduate students. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... The Union for Reform Judaism, formerly known as the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UHAC), is an organization which supports Reform Jewish congregations in North America. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Ecolab is a $4. ... Michael Schwerner Michael Schwerner (November 6, 1939 – June 21, 1964), called Mickey by friends and colleagues, was a CORE field worker killed in Philadelphia, Mississippi, by the Ku Klux Klan in response to the civil-rights work he coordinated, which included promoting registration to vote among Mississippi African Americans. ... Cornell is the name of some places in the United States of America. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Samuel H. Shapiro (April 25, 1907 - March 16, 1987) was Democratic Governor of Illinois, serving from 1968 to 1969. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... For other uses, see Chabad (disambiguation). ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private American research university. ... This article is about the television network. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... Queens College, Queens College or Queens College is the name of more than one institution, see: Queens College, Cambridge Queens College, Charlotte Queens College, Hong Kong Queens College, London Queens College, New York Queens College, Nassau The Queens College, Oxford Queens College was the... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the worlds largest beverage company, largest manufacturer, distributor and marketer of non-alcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world, and one of the largest corporations in the United States. ... Revlon (NYSE: REV) is an American cosmetics company. ... Steven Michael Stone, nicknamed Stoney (born July 14, 1947, in South Euclid, Ohio) is a former American Major League Baseball player and current sportscaster. ... Kent State University (KSU) is an institution of higher learning located in Kent, Ohio, which is 1 hour south-east from Cleveland. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Cornell is the name of some places in the United States of America. ... Citi redirects here. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900-acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... Scott Wolf on Everwood Scott Richard Wolf (born June 4, 1968) is an American actor. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... The University of Delaware (UD) is the largest university in the U.S. state of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Samuel Sam Zell (born September 1941) is a U.S.-born billionaire and real estate entrepreneur. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Mark Elliot Zuckerberg (born May 14, 1984) is an American entrepreneur. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Facebook is a social networking website that was launched on February 4, 2004. ...

List of chapters

The fraternity currently has 136 active chapters and colonies. Alpha Epsilon Pi is the only national fraternity to have a chapter at every Ivy League and University of California Campus with the exception of UC Merced, San Francisco and Hastings.

. ...

External links

  • Alpha Epsilon Pi International

References

  1. ^ Philanthropy Programming
  2. ^ Chapter Roll
  3. ^ History
  4. ^ Alpha Epsilon Pi International. Retrieved on 2007-11-30.
  5. ^ Dunn, Sidney N. (2003). Alpha Epsilon Pi: Commitment for a lifetime. Indianapolis, Indiana: Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity, Inc., 128. 
  6. ^ AEPi organizational model
  7. ^ AEPi Babson: Alumni. Retrieved on 2008-03-16.
  8. ^ Kesselman, Bruce (July 2006). 46 Union Street, 240. ISBN 978-0977244201. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
ALPHA EPSILON PI - BETA UPSILON (455 words)
The Mission of Alpha Epsilon Pi Alpha Epsilon Pi, like other fraternities with a Jewish heritage, was founded to provide opportunities for the Jewish college man seeking the best possible college and fraternity experience.
Alpha Epsilon Pi soon broadened its role to include serving as the living quarters for its members.
Alpha Epsilon Pi is a Jewish fraternity, though non-discriminatory and open to all who are willing t o espouse its purpose and values.
RUSH!! Alpha Epsilon Pi (560 words)
The Mu Dueteron Chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi was founded in 1947, and it continues to be active on the Mizzou campus.
Alpha Epsilon Pi alumni all over the country provide a solid foundation in the uncertain "job search" times around and after graduation as well as invaluble insight from their own extensive experiences.
Alpha Epsilon Pi looks for people who have something to offer the fraternity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m