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Encyclopedia > Alnwick Castle
Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln
Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln

Alnwick Castle is a castle and stately home in Alnwick, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom and the residence of the Duke of Northumberland, built immediately following the Norman conquest, and renovated and remodelled a number of times. It is a Grade I listed building.[1] Download high resolution version (1030x444, 126 KB)Alnwick Castle - Alnwick - Northumberland - England - by & copyright Tagishsimon, 14th August 2004. ... Download high resolution version (1030x444, 126 KB)Alnwick Castle - Alnwick - Northumberland - England - by & copyright Tagishsimon, 14th August 2004. ... The River Aln runs through the Alnwick district of the County of Northumberland in England, discharging into the North Sea on the east coast of England. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... For the parish in New Brunswick, see Alnwick, New Brunswick Alnwick (pronounced anick ) is a small market town in north Northumberland, in the north-east of England. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Ralph George Algernon Percy (b. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ...

Contents

History

Yves de Vescy, Baron of Alnwick, erected the first parts of the castle in 1096. It was built to defend England's northern border against the Scottish invasions and border reivers. It was besieged in 1172 and again in 1174 by William the Lion, King of Scotland and William was captured outside the walls during the Battle of Alnwick. In 1309 it was bought from Antony Bek the Bishop of Durham by Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy and it has been owned by the Percy family, the Earls and later Dukes of Northumberland since then. The first Percy lord of Alnwick restored the castle and the Abbot's Tower, the Middle Gateway and the Constable's Tower survive from this period. In 1404-5 the Percys rebelled against Henry IV who besieged and then took the castle. This article is about the country. ... See also Border Reivers (Rugby) and Border Reivers (game); or Reavers for other varieties of brigand. ... William I the Lion ( known in Gaelic as Uilliam Garm1 or William the Rough), (1142/1143 - December 4, 1214) reigned as King of Scots from 1165 to 1214. ... Antony Bek (d. ... The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... The title of Earl of Northumberland was created several times in the Peerages of England and Great Britain. ... The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ... Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ...


During the Wars of the Roses it was held against King Edward until its surrender in mid-September 1461 after the Battle of Towton. Re-captured by Sir William Tailboys during the winter he surrendered to Hastings, Sir John Howard and Sir Ralph Grey of Heton in late July 1462. Grey was appointed captain but surrendered after a sharp siege in the early autumn. King Edward responded with vigour and when the Earl of Warwick arrived in November Queen Margaret and her French advisor, Pierre de Breze were forced to sail to Scotland for help. They organised a mainly Scots relief force which under Angus and de Breze set out on 22 November. Warwick's army, commanded by the experienced Earl of Kent and the recently pardoned Lord Scales, prevented news getting through to the starving garrisons. As a result the nearby Bamburgh and Dunstanburgh castles soon agreed terms and surrendered. But Hungerford and Whittingham held Alnwick until Warwick was forced to withdraw when de Breze and Angus arrived on 5 January 1463. Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... The Battle of Towton in the Wars of the Roses was the bloodiest ever fought on British soil, with casualties believed to have been in excess of 20,000 (perhaps as many as 30,000) men. ... Bamburgh Castle from the beach. ... Dunstanburgh Castle. ...


The Lancastrians missed a great chance to bring Warwick to battle instead being content to retire, leaving behind only a token force which surrendered next day.


By May 1463 Alnwick was in Lancastrian hands for the third time since Towton, betrayed by Grey of Heton who tricked the commander, Sir John Astley. Astley was imprisoned and Hungerford resumed command.


After Montagu's triumphs at Hedgeley Moor and Hexham in 1464 Warwick arrived before Alnwick on 23 June and received its surrender next day. The Battle of Hedgeley Moor, 25 April 1464, was a battle of the Wars of the Roses. ... Combatants House of York House of Lancaster Commanders John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset Strength 4,000 Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Hexham (May 15, 1464) marked the end of significant Lancastrian resistance in the north of England during the early part...


The 6th Earl of Northumberland carried out renovations in the 16th century. In the second half of the 18th century Robert Adam carried out many alterations. The interiors were largely in a Strawberry Hill gothic style which was not at all typical of his work, which was usually neoclassical. However in the 19th century Algernon, 4th Duke of Northumberland replaced much of this with less ostentatious architecture designed by Anthony Salvin. According to the official website a large amount of Adam's work survives, but little or none of it remains in the principal rooms shown to the public, which were redecorated in an opulent Italianate style in the Victorian era by Luigi Canina. Henry Percy, 6th Earl of Northumberland (1502–1537), was the son of Henry Algernon Percy, 5th Earl of Northumberland. ... Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Strawberry Hill is the name of several places: Strawberry Hill, London, England Strawberry Hill (Kansas City, Kansas) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland (15 December 1792 - 12 February 1865) was a British aristocrat and Conservative politician, who briefly served as First Lord of the Admiralty in Lord Derbys first government. ... Categories: Stub | 1799 births | 1881 deaths ... The Railway station of Albury, New South Wales, Australia was built in the Italianate Architectural Style in 1881 Italianate Architectural Style Italianate Architectural Style Italianate Architectural Style Italianate, also known as Tuscan or Lombard, describes the style of villas which developed in England, emerging from the Picturesque Movement of the... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Luigi Canina (1795–1856) was an Italian archaeologist and architect. ...


Current use

Since the Second World War, parts of the castle have been used by various educational establishments: Firstly, by the Newcastle Church High School for Girls then, from 1945 to 1975, as a teacher training college and, since 1981, by St. Cloud State University as a branch campus forming part of their International Study Programme. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Education encompasses teaching and learning specific skills, and also something less tangible but more profound: the imparting of knowledge, good judgement and wisdom. ... St. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


Special exhibitions are housed in three of the castle's perimeter towers. The Postern Tower, as well as featuring an exhibition on the Dukes of Northumberland and their interest in archaeology, includes frescoes from Pompeii, relics from Ancient Egypt and Romano-British objects. Constable's Tower houses military displays like the Percy Tenantry Volunteers exhibition, local, volunteer soldiers raised to repel Napoleon's planned invasion in the period 1798-1814. The Abbot's Tower houses the Regimental Museum of the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers. For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Relic (disambiguation). ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... Romano-British is a term used to refer to the Romanized Britons under the Roman Empire (and later the Western Roman Empire) and in the years after the Roman departure exposed to Roman culture and Christian religion. ... For other uses, see Volunteer (disambiguation). ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ... This article or section should be merged with Northumberland Fusiliers The Northumberland Fusiliers Museum is a museum located within the Abbots Tower of Alnwick Castle in Alnwick, Northumberland, England. ...


Other facilities open to the public including Knight's Quest (formerly Knight's School), Dragons Quest, the Gift Shop, the Courtyard Cafe and restaurant; The Sanctuary at the Castle.


The castle is used as a stand in for the exterior and interior of Hogwarts in the Harry Potter films (though the wide angle images are computer generated). It has previously been a location used in Becket, Blackadder I, Robin Hood Prince of Thieves and many others listed in the Location section of the Alnwick Castle website. Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... Harry Potter may refer to the following films: Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (not yet released) Harry Potter and... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... For other uses, see Blackadder (disambiguation). ... Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was a 1991 film directed by Kevin Reynolds. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML...


The castle is open to the public throughout the summer. After Windsor Castle, it is the second largest inhabited castle in England. The castle was rated 10th in the Historic Houses Association English Visitor Attractions Survey, with 195,504 visitors in 2006.[2] This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... The Historic Houses Association is a British non profit making organisation concerned with the preservation of privately owned country houses. ...


Construction

Alnwick Castle by Canaletto, circa 1750
Alnwick Castle by Canaletto, circa 1750

The castle consists of two main rings of buildings. The inner ring is set around a small courtyard and contains the principal rooms. This structure is at the centre of a large bailey. As the central block was not large enough to contain all the accommodations required in later centuries, a large range of buildings was constructed along the south wall of the bailey. These two main areas of accommodation are connected by a link building. There are towers at regular intervals along the walls of the outer bailey. About a sixth of the bailey wall has been reduced almost to ground level on the bailey side to open up views into the park. Stable and service yards adjoin the castle outside the bailey; these would not have existed when the castle still had a military function. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (750x603, 97 KB) Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, England by Canaletto who was in England from 1746 to 1755. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (750x603, 97 KB) Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, England by Canaletto who was in England from 1746 to 1755. ... The Stonemasons Yard, painted 1726-30. ... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ...


Alnwick castle has two parks. Immediately to the north of the castle is a relatively small park straddling the River Aln which was landscaped by Lancelot Brown ("Capability Brown") and Thomas Call in the 18th century; it is known as locally as The Pastures. Nearby is the much larger Hulne Park, which contains the remains of Hulne Priory. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Lancelot Brown (1715/1716 - February 6, 1783), more commonly known as Capability Brown, was an English landscape gardener, now remembered as the last of the great English eighteenth-century artists to be accorded his due, and Englands greatest gardener. Born in Northumberland, he was employed by various landed families... Hulne Priory is a monastery founded in the 13th century by the Carmelites, or White Friars which was one of the Orders of Mendicants, bound by their rule to live in extreme poverty. ... Hulne Priory is a monastery that was founded in the 13th century by the Carmelites, or White Friars who were one of the Orders of Mendicants, bound by their rule to live in extreme poverty. ...


The castle is in good repair and used for many purposes. It provides a home for the present Duke and family and offices for Northumberland Estates, which manages the Duke's extensive farming and property holdings.


Alnwick Garden

Adjacent to the castle, the present Duchess of Northumberland, Jane, has established the Alnwick Garden, a formal garden set around a cascading fountain. It is the most ambitious new garden created in the United Kingdom since the Second World War, with a reported development cost for the whole of £42 million pounds (press release of 7 August 2003). The garden belongs to a charitable trust which is separate from the Northumberland Estates, but the Duke of Northumberland donated the 42 acre (170,000 m²) site and £9 million. Image File history File linksMetadata Alnwick. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Alnwick. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1224, 384 KB) Alnwick Gardens Vistor Centre I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1224, 384 KB) Alnwick Gardens Vistor Centre I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The worlds highest fountain: King Fahds Fountain in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Three traditional fountain features: a low jet, a pair of raised basins, and sculpture with a water theme, here hippocamps (Villa Borghese, Rome) A traditional fountain is an arrangement where water issues from a source (Latin fons... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first phase of development, opened in October 2001, involved the creation of the fountain and initial planting of the gardens. In 2004 a large 6000 sq. ft 'tree house' complex, including a cafe, was opened. It is deemed one of the largest treehouses in the world. By that year it was the third most visited paid entry garden in the UK (after Kew Gardens and Wisley), with over half a million visitors. In February 2005, a poison garden, growing plants such as cannabis and opium poppy, was added. May 2006 saw the opening of a pavilion and visitor centre designed by Sir Michael Hopkins and Buro Happold which can hold up to 1,000 people.[3] The pavilion and visitor's centre feature a barrel-vaulted gridshell roof with ETFE foil cushions. It is hoped that the remaining elements of the plan will all be built by 2008. Kew Gardens is the name of several places: Kew Gardens is a commonly-used name for the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, United Kingdom Kew Gardens is the name of a park in The Beaches neighborhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Kew Gardens is also the name of a neighborhood... The Royal Horticultural Societys garden at Wisley in the English county of Surrey south of London, is one of the three most visited paid gardens in the United Kingdom alongside Kew Gardens and Alnwick Garden. ... For other uses, see Poison (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus Subspecies L. subsp. ... Binomial name L. The opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, is the type of poppy from which opium and all refined opiates such as morphine, thebaine, codeine, papaverine, and noscapine are extracted. ... Wellcome Trust building on Euston Road Sir Michael Hopkins CBE (b. ... // View of the Great Court Buro Happold is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment. ... ETFE (Ethylene TetrafluoroEthylene) - a fluorocarbon-based polymer (a fluoropolymer), a kind of plastic. ...


The purpose of the garden is to augment the facilities available on the Alnwick Castle site for tourists and educational visitors.


Admission to the Garden and Treehouse costs £7 with the option of donating an extra pound to the charity along with a £2 compulsory parking fee.


Location filming

Alnwick Castle has been used as a setting in many films and television series.


Films

Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Mary, Queen of Scrots is a 1971 biographical film which tells the story of the life of Queen Mary I of Scotland. ... Anthony Andrews (born January 12, 1948 in London) is an English actor, best known for his role in Brideshead Revisited playing the doomed Sebastian Flyte. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was a 1991 film directed by Kevin Reynolds. ... Monk Dawson is a film that was released in 1998, directed and produced by Tom Waller and starring John Michie, Benedict Taylor, and Paula Hamilton. ... Elizabeth is an Academy Award winning 1998 film loosely based on the early reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, known in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is the second fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a 2008 fantasy adventure, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ...

Television

  • 1977 - Count Dracula. BBC production starring Louis Jordan and Frank Finlay
  • 1983 - The Black Adder. Starring Rowan Atkinson in the first of the Blackadder series
  • 1984-86 - Robin of Sherwood. Starring Michael Praed in the first series, Jason Connery in the second
  • 1987 - Treasure Hunt. Anneka Rice, Kenneth Kendall and Wincey Willis followed the clues
  • 1993 - The Clothes Show. Jeff Banks and Selina Scott presented a world of fashion
  • 1994 – Highway. Harry Secombe presented this popular series
  • 1994 - The Dwelling Place. Catherine Cookson Mini series starring James Fox
  • 1995 - Antiques Roadshow. This featured some of the Castle’s treasures as well as the usual exciting finds.
  • 1995 - The Fast Show. Starring Charlie Higson, Paul Whitehouse, John Thomson, Arabella Weir, Mark Williams, and many more
  • 1995 - The Glass Virgin, Starring Nigel Havers, Sylvia Sims, and Emily Mortimer
  • 1995-6 - The Famous Five, The BBC series of the Enid Blyton books
  • 1997 – Ivanhoe. BBC series starring Steven Waddington and Christopher Lee
  • 1998 - A Knight in Camelot. Disney Channel production starring Whoopi Goldberg and Michael York
  • 1999-2000 – Badger. Drama series about wildlife police starring Jerome Flynn
  • 2000 - A Dinner of Herbs. Catherine Cookson mini-series starring Billie Whitelaw
  • 2000 - Watercolour Challenge. Channel 4 education series presented by Hannah Gordon
  • 2004 - Bloody Britain. Discovery Channel production presented by Rory McGrath
  • 2005 The Virgin Queen

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Images of England: Alnwick Castle. English Heritage. Retrieved on 2007-11-29.
  2. ^ Heritage: Britain's stately stars, The Guardian, March 3, 2008; p. 11, according to newsuk.co.uk
  3. ^ Alnwick Garden’s ‘transparent’ visitor centre, Europe Travel News, 16 May, 2006

The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Glen Lyndon Dodds, (Albion Press, 2002) Historic Sites of Northumberland & Newcastle upon Tyne pp 18-27
  • Fry, Plantagenet Somerset (1980). The David & Charles Book of Castles. Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 177–178. ISBN 0-7153-7976-3. 
  • Johnson, Paul (1989). Castles of England, Scotland and Wales. London: Weidenfield and Nicolson, ISBN 0-297-83162-3.

See also

  • Syon House - the west London residence of the Dukes of Northumberland.
  • Northumberland House - the former central London residence of the Dukes of Northumberland.
  • Petworth House - belonged to the Earls of Northumberland until the 17th century

Syon House before the alterations of the 1760s Robert Adams plan for the reconstruction of Syon House. ... The Strand front of Northumberland House in 1752 by Canaletto. ... A distant view of Petworth House across the lake in Petworth Park by JMW Turner. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Alnwick Castle

Coordinates: 55.4155° N 1.7069° W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Castle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3117 words)
A castle (from the Latin castellum, diminutive of castra, a military camp, in turn the plural of castrum or watchpost), is a fort, a camp and the logical development of a fortified enclosure.
Castle walls, together with lodgings (keep) suitable for a Baron, as well as lower grade housing within the walls to accommodate some of the key population of the local area, served this purpose.
Castles were also developed to defend key part of the countryside such as a mountain pass or river estuary, and often made use of the natural geography to support the defensive walls through exploitation of cliffs, rivers, hills, and the like.
Alnwick Castle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (895 words)
Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln
Alnwick Castle is a castle and stately home in Alnwick, Northumberland, England.
Immediately to the north of the castle is a relatively small park straddling the River Aln which was landscaped by Lancelot Brown ("Capability Brown") and Thomas Call in the 18th century; it is known as locally as The Pastures.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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