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Encyclopedia > Allobroges
A map of Gaul in the 1st century BC, showing the relative position of the Allobroges tribe.
A map of Gaul in the 1st century BC, showing the relative position of the Allobroges tribe.

The Allobroges (sometimes spelt as allobrogs) were a warlike Celtic tribe in Gaul located between the Rhône River and the Lake of Geneva in what later became Savoy, Dauphiné, and Vivarais. Their cities were in areas of modern-day Lyon, Saint-Etienne and Grenoble and the modern departement of Isère and in the modern Switzerland. Their capital was today's Vienne. Image File history File links Gaul,_1st_century_BC.gif Summary Description  Gaul, 1st century BC Author/Source  The Department of History, United States Military Academy Permission  In the public domain as original works of the United States federal government and/or military [1] Licensing File links The following pages link to... Image File history File links Gaul,_1st_century_BC.gif Summary Description  Gaul, 1st century BC Author/Source  The Department of History, United States Military Academy Permission  In the public domain as original works of the United States federal government and/or military [1] Licensing File links The following pages link to... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... A Celtic cross. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Rhônes course. ... The Jet dEau fountain in Lake Geneva in Geneva Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman, Le Léman or Lac de Genève, (German: Genfersee) is the second largest freshwater lake in central Europe (after Lake Balaton), divided between France (Haute-Savoie) and Switzerland (cantons of Vaud, Geneva, and... Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... Flag of the Dauphiné Dauphiné is a former province in southeastern France, roughly corresponding to the present départements of the Isère, Drôme, and Hautes-Alpes. ... Vivarais (Occitan: Vivarés) refers to a part of France: a traditional region in the south-est of the country, covering the département of Ardèche, named after its capital Viviers on the river Rhône. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: (Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon the best) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Region Rhône-Alpes Department Rhône (69) Subdivisions 9 arrondissements Intercommunality Urban Community of Lyon Mayor Gérard Collomb  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics... Saint Etienne may mean: Saint-Étienne, a city in south-eastern France, 80 km from Lyon. ... Grenoble (Arpitan: Grasanòbol) is a city and commune in south-east France, situated at the foot of the Alps, at the confluence of the Drac into the Isère River. ... Isère is a département in the east of France named after the Isère River. ... This article is about the French département. ...


First recorded reference to Allobroges is from Greek historian Polybius in 150-130 BC. He tells how they unsuccessfully resisted Hannibal when he crossed the Alps in 218 BC. Polybius (c. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC - 150s BC - 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC Years: 155 BC 154 BC 153 BC 152 BC 151 BC - 150 BC - 149 BC 148 BC... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC - 130s BC - 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC Years: 135 BC 134 BC 133 BC 132 BC 131 BC - 130 BC - 129 BC 128 BC... Hannibal, the son of Hamilcar Barca, (247 BC – ca. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 223 BC 222 BC 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC - 218 BC - 217 BC 216 BC...

Contents

Relations with Romans

Allobroges were famous for their warriors, wealth and import of wheat. They controlled most of the Rhone river valley and various important mountain passes to Italy, e.g. Via Agrippa. Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. compactum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 For the indie rock group see: Wheat (band). ...


In 123 BC Allobroges gave shelter to king Tuto-Motulus of the Salluvii tribe Rome had conquered and refused to hand him over. Rome declared war and moved against them. In August 8, 121 BC legions of Quintus Fabius Maximus defeated them and forced them to submit; Maximus earned a moniker Allobrogicus for this feat. Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC Years: 128 BC 127 BC 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC - 123 BC - 122 BC 121 BC... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC Years: 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC 123 BC 122 BC - 121 BC - 120 BC 119 BC... Quintus Fabius Maximus Allobrogicus, was a Roman statesman and general. ...


The Allobroges additionally played a rather important part in deciding to foil the second Catiline Conspiracy of 63 BCE, an attempt to foment civil war throughout Italy and simultaneously burn down Rome. It was a plot by ostracized high political Roman elites and allied plebeian military connected to their cause. The conspirators made the mistake of attempting to recruit the Allobroges via their ambassadors delegation, that happened to be in Rome during the planning of the conspiracy. Since the Allobroge delegation was in Rome seeking relief from the oppression of their Roman governor, one of the Catiline conspirators, Lentulus Sura instructed Publius Umbrenus, a businessman with dealings in Gaul, to offer to free them of their miseries to throw off the heavy yoke of their governor--if they would join the Catiline conspiracy against Rome. The conspiracy was revealed to the Allobroges, however their diplomatic envoys informed the current consul Cicero. Cicero instructed the Allobroges envoys to get tangible proof of the conspiracy. Thinking they were gaining allies, five of the leading conspirators wrote letters to the Allobroges so that the envoys could show their people that there was hope in a real conspiracy. However, these letters were intercepted instead in transit to Gaul. Then, Cicero had the incriminating letters read before the Senate the following day, in the first of his Catiline Orations. With the plot spoiled, its intricate planning was unable to work properly, and its ringleaders were rounded up rather quickly or sacrificed themselves mostly in unprepared pitched battles that occurred around Rome. Catiline (Lucius Sergius Catilina) (108 BC-62 BC) was a Roman politician of the 1st century BC who is best known for the Catiline (or Catilinarian) conspiracy, an attempt to overthrow the Roman Republic, and in particular the power of the aristocratic Senate. ... In 63 BC Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 BC), orator, statesman and patriot, attained the rank of consul and in that capacity exposed to the Roman Senate the plot of Lucius Sergius Catilina (approx. ...


In short, Rome might have been burned down except for the Roman loyalty of the Allobroges.


However, they rebelled on their own shortly thereafter. In 61 BC chief Catugnatus revolted but Gaius Pomptinus defeated them at Solonium. Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 66 BC 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58...


Next, loyal once more, Allobrogian warriors joined Julius Caesar during his conquest of Gaul. Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in classical antiquity. ...


A generation later, Emperor Augustus placed Allobroges in the region of Gallia Narbonensis and later Gallia Viennensis. Under the Roman Empire, Vienne grew and in 100 AD Tacitus described it as "historic and imposing". Archaeological excavations have revealed extensive warehouses. They collected toll from traffic passing up Via Agrippa and various other Roman roads. For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... -1... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... A Roman road in Pompeii Road Construction on Trajans Column The Roman roads were essential for the growth of the Roman empire, by enabling the Romans to move armies. ...


Religion

It is noteworthy first of all which deities are not represented. From the "Palace of Mirrors" baths at Saint-Romain-en-Gal, across the river from the modern town of Vienna, but part of ancient Vienne, comes a statue of the tutelary goddess of Vienne. North-East of Vienne, north of modern Grenoble, is a major healing sanctuary at the moren town of Aix-les-Bains (the name indicates that this function continued for some time). This was dedicated to a southern Gaulish healing god Barvos, and not to Apollo as might have been expected of such a Romanised people. Grenoble (Arpitan: Grasanòbol) is a city and commune in south-east France, situated at the foot of the Alps, at the confluence of the Drac into the Isère River. ... Aix-les-Bains is a spa town of eastern France, near the Lac du Bourget, and 9 m. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a...


See also

A map of Gaul showing the relative position of the tribes. ...

References

  • Allobroges and Hannibal
  • Initial material derived from the public domain Lempriere's Dictionary of 1824.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Allobroges - LoveToKnow 1911 (249 words)
The Allobroges first occur in history as taking part with Hannibal in the invasion of Italy.
After the subjugation of the Salluvii (Salyes) by the Romans in 123 B.C., having given shelter to their king Tutomotulus and refused to surrender him, the Allobroges were attacked and finally defeated (August 8, 121) at the junction of the Rhodanus and Isara by Q. Fabius Maximus (afterwards Allobrogicus).
But they still remained hostile to Rome, as is shown by the conduct of their ambassadors in the Catilinarian conspiracy (63; see Catiline); two years later a revolt under Catugnatus was put down by Gaius Pomptinus at Solonium.
Allobroges - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (412 words)
The Allobroges (sometimes spelt as allobrogs) were a warlike Celtic tribe in Gaul located between the Rhône River and the Lake of Geneva in what later became Savoy, Dauphiné, and Vivarais.
Allobroges were famous for their warriors, wealth and import of wheat.
In 123 BC Allobroges gave shelter to king Tuto-Motulus of the Salluvii tribe Rome had conquered and refused to hand him over.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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