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Encyclopedia > Allen B. DuMont

Allen Balcom DuMont (also spelled Du Mont) (January 29, 1901November 14, 1965) was an American scientist and inventor best known for improvements to the cathode ray tube in 1931 for use in television receivers. Seven years later he manufactured and sold the first commercially practical television set to the public. In June Of 1938, his Model 180 television receiver was the first all-electronic television set ever sold to the public, a few months prior to RCA's first set in April of 1939. In 1946, DuMont founded the first television network to be licensed, the DuMont Television Network, initially by linking station WABD (named for DuMont) in New York City to station W3XWT, which later became WTTG, in Washington, D.C. (WTTG was named for Dr. Thomas T. Goldsmith, DuMont's Vice President of Research, and his best friend.) is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For the musical form, see Invention (music). ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... The DuMont Television Network was the worlds first commercial television network, beginning operation in the United States in 1946. ... WNYW, channel 5, is the flagship television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, located in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... WTTG, FOX5 DC is an owned and operated TV station of the Fox Broadcasting Company. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

DuMont was born in Brooklyn, New York City. At the age of 10, he was stricken with polio and was quarantined at his family's Eastern Parkway apartment for nearly a year. During his quarantine, his father brought home books and magazines for the young DuMont to read while bedridden. At this time, DuMont developed an interest in science, specifically wireless radio communication, and taught himself Morse code. This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Eastern Parkway is a street that runs through a portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ...


His father bought him a crystal radio receiver which he assembled, took apart, reassembled and rebuilt several times. He improved his set each time he rebuilt it and later built a transmitter, while his father obtained the landlord's permission to erect a 30-foot high transceiving antenna on the roof. An example of a modern set created by VE6AB The crystal radio receiver (also known as a crystal set) is a passive radio receiver consisting of a variable LC tuned circuit, a diode detector, and audio transducer. ... A transceiver is a device that has both a transmitter and a receiver which are combined in to one. ... A yagi antenna Most simply, an antenna is an electronic component designed to send or receive radio waves. ...


While recuperating from polio, DuMont was advised to swim to regain the use of his legs. In 1914, the family moved to Montclair, New Jersey, where there was an indoor year-round pool available at the local YMCA. He graduated from Montclair High School in 1919, and went to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, where he was part of the Alpha Chapter of the Theta Xi Fraternity. Swimmer redirects here. ... Montclair is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... The front of the main building of Montclair High School. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a nonsectarian, coeducational private research university in Troy, New York, a city lying just outside the state capital of Albany. ... Looking west down Broadway at downtown Troy. ... Theta Xi (ΘΞ) is a fraternity founded at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York on 29 April 1864. ...


Radio operation

In 1915, DuMont became the youngest American to obtain a first class commercial radio operator's license at age 14. The following summer, he worked as a radio operator aboard a coastal steamer making runs from New York to Providence, Rhode Island. As the summers went by, he made his way to the Caribbean, South America and, after World War I, to Europe, where, during the summer of 1922, he was stuck in Copenhagen for months because of a dock workers strike. Providence redirects here. ... West Indies redirects here. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ...


After graduating from Rensselaer in 1924, DuMont worked at the Westinghouse Lamp Company in Bloomfield, New Jersey, in charge of radio tube production. While there, he increased production from 500 tubes per day to an astounding 50,000 tubes per day. Management decided to give him a $500 bonus, a small raise, and the "Westinghouse Award", an award devised to recognize his accomplishments. The "Westinghouse Award" was later presented as a scholarship award to high school seniors showing promise in a field of science. Map of Bloomfield Township in Essex County Bloomfield is a Township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Structure of a vacuum tube diode Structure of a vacuum tube triode In electronics, a vacuum tube, electron tube, or (outside North America) thermionic valve or just valve, is a device used to amplify, switch or modify a signal by controlling the movement of electrons in an evacuated space. ...


By 1928, DuMont was searching for new opportunities and was wooed by Dr. Lee De Forest, a radio pioneer who developed the audion tube, the original voice amplifier for radio reception. De Forest had a checkered career as an inventor and had several failed business ventures. DuMont was hired as vice president and production manager for radio tubes. Here he came in contact with a mechanical television, one that De Forest had purchased from C. Francis Jenkins, another radio pioneer. DuMont worked to improve television transmission and reception and went to De Forest asking for funds to build a long lasting cathode ray tube for television reception. De Forest denied DuMont's request as De Forest's investors were demanding better returns. Subsequently, DuMont resigned at the same time that De Forest sold his radio manufacturing business to David Sarnoff at RCA. Lee De Forest, (August 26, 1873 – June 30, 1961) was an American inventor with over 300 patents to his credit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Charles Francis Jenkins (August 22, 1867 - June 5, 1934) was a pioneer of early cinema and one of the inventors of television, though he used mechanical rather than electronic technologies. ...


Later projects

DuMont then started his own company, DuMont Laboratories, in the basement of his Cedar Grove, New Jersey home, building long-lasting cathode ray tubes. In 1931, he sold two tubes to two college science laboratories for $35 each. DuMont Laboratories began in 1931, by Allen B. DuMont. ... Map of Cedar Grove Township in Essex County Cedar Grove Township is a Township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ...


In 1932, DuMont proposed a "ship finder" device to the United States Army Signal Corps at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, that used radio wave distortions to locate objects on a cathode ray tube screen—he had essentially invented radar. The military asked him, however, not to take out a patent for developing what they wanted to maintain as a secret, and so he is not often mentioned among those responsible for radar. He did, however, go on to develop long-range precision radar to aid the Allies during WWII. As a consequence the French Government knighted him in 1952. Branch insignia of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, representing Myers Wigwag The U.S. Army Signal Corps was founded in 1861 by United States Army Major Albert J. Myer, a physician by training. ... Ft. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ...


During the early years of World War II, DuMont received special government contracts to provide large 36" wide cathode ray tubes. These special tubes allowed scientists working on the Manhattan Project to study the action of accelerated electrons. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ...


DuMont produced black and white televisions in the 1940s and 1950s that were generally regarded as offering highest quality and durability. Many of these premium sets included a built in AM/FM radio and record player.


The DuMont Television Network was not an unqualified success, being faced with the major problem of how to make a profit without the benefit of an already established radio network as a base. After ten years, DuMont shuttered the network and sold what remained of his television operations to John Kluge in 1956, which Kluge renamed Metromedia. DuMont's partner, Thomas T. Goldsmith, remained on Metromedia's board of directors from this time all the way until Kluge sold the stations to the Fox Television Stations Group. John Werner Kluge (born September 21, 1914) is an entrepreneur who was born in Chemnitz, Germany, best known as a television industry mogul in the United States. ... 1970s logo for WTCN-TV (now KARE) in Minneapolis, which included the corporate logo for Metromedia; this logo was also used by KTTV in Los Angeles Metromedia Producers Corporation logo Metromedia (also often MetroMedia) was a media company that owned radio and television stations in the United States from 1956... The Fox Television Stations (FTS) are a group of television stations located throughout the United States which are owned-and-operated by the Fox Broadcasting Company. ...


DuMont sold his manufacturing operations in 1960. The television manufacturing division was sold to Emerson Radio. His research laboratory became part of Fairchild Camera and later developed semiconductor microchips. Robert Noyce, founder of Intel, originally worked for DuMont as an engineer. In the late 1950s, the Dumont laboratory, now owned by Fairchild, developed the original Sony Trinitron color picture tube, under a subcontract. Emerson Radio Corporation, founded in 1948, is one of the United States’ largest volume consumer electronics distributors, with a recognized trademark in continuous use since 1912. ... Fairchild Camera and Instrument was a company founded by Sherman Fairchild. ... A semiconductor is a solid material that has electrical conductivity in between that of a conductor and that of an insulator; it can vary over that wide range either permanently or dynamically. ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ... Robert Noyce Robert Noyce (December 12, 1927 – June 3, 1990), nicknamed the Mayor of Silicon Valley, co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957 and Intel in 1968. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... Picture of a Dell-branded Sony Trinitron, still bearing the Trinitron logo. ...


Awards and later life

DuMont was the first to provide funding for educational television broadcasting. He was the recipient of numerous honorary degrees and awards, among them the Cross of Knight awarded by the French Government, the Horatio Alger Award, the Westinghouse Award, and the DeForest Medal. The Horatio Alger Award is an American award, which is given to individuals who have succeeded in the face of adversity. ...


DuMont died in 1965 and is buried in Mount Hebron Cemetery in Montclair, New Jersey. The television center at Montclair State University bears his name. Mount Hebron Cemetery is a cemetery in Montclair, in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Montclair is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Montclair State University is a public university located in Montclair, Little Falls, and Clifton, New Jersey. ...


After Allen DuMont's death, his brother, Don DuMont, ran for president. A good humor man from Illinois, Don ran as a Republican.


External links

  • Who Killed Captain Video?: How the FCC strangled a TV pioneer.
  • Allen DuMont's Photo & Gravesite
  • Allen B. Dumont helps U.S. Army develop Countermeasure by reproducing a critical vacuum tube in a captured WW2 Nazi radar. Results is the sparing of thousands of U.S. and British flyers lives.

 
 

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