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Encyclopedia > Alleged Palace of David site

The alleged Palace of David site is a large 10th to 9th century BC public building in eastern Jerusalem whose discovery was announced on August 4, 2005 by Israeli archaeologist Eilat Mazar, who identifies it as the palace of the Biblical King David. The site is widely recognized as a major find, but the specific identification is disputed. The Biblical chronologies would imply that David's palace would have been built very early in the 10th century BC. Due to its proximity with another site known as the Stepped Stone Structure, Mazar named this new discovery the Large Stone Structure. (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) // Overview Events Partition of ancient Israel into the Kingdoms of Judah and Israel (c. ... (10th century BC - 9th century BC - 8th century BC - other centuries) (900s BC - 890s BC - 880s BC - 870s BC - 860s BC - 850s BC - 840s BC - 830s BC - 820s BC - 810s BC - 800s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Kingdom of Kush (900 BC... Jerusalem (31°46′N 35°14′E; Hebrew: (help· info) Yerushalayim; Arabic: (help· info) al-Quds), Greek Ιεροσόλυμα, is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 meters. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Dr. Eilat Mazar is a third-generation Israeli archaeologist. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... David and Goliath by Caravaggio, c. ... Dr. Eilat Mazar is a third-generation Israeli archaeologist. ...


The research was funded by a conservative group seeking to confirm aspects of Biblical history, which has led to the skepticism of some archaeologists of the sensational claim of identification, a common criticism of the Biblical archaeology approach. One possibility suggested by other archaeologists is that the site may be the Jebusite fortress of Zion that was conquered by David. However, the remains so far indicate that this major public building was completed in the Phoenician style. The Biblical account, in Books of Samuel II 5:11 has it that Hiram of Tyre (i.e., in Phoenicia) built the palace. Biblical archaeology involves the recovery and scientific investigation of the material remains of past cultures that can illuminate the periods and descriptions in the Bible. ... According to the Hebrew Bible the Jebusites (Hebrew יְבוּסִי, Standard Hebrew Yəvusi, Tiberian Hebrew Yəḇûsî) were a Canaänite tribe who inhabited the region around Jerusalem in pre-biblical times (second millennium BC). ... The Dormition Church, situated on Mount Zion Zion, or Sion (צִיּוֹן Height, Standard Hebrew Tziyyon, Tiberian Hebrew Tsiyyôn; Arabic صهيون Ṣuhyūn), is an archaic term that originally referred to a specific mountain near Jerusalem (Mount Zion), on which stood a Jebusite fortress of the same name that was conquered by... The Books of Samuel, also referred to as [The Book of] Samuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל), are (two) books in the Hebrew Bible (Judaisms Tanakh and originally written in Hebrew) and the Old Testament of Christianity. ... Hiram I was king of Tyre from 969 BC to 936 BC.During his reign, Tyre grew out from a satellite to the more important city of Sidon to the most important of the Phoenician cities and the holder of a large trading empire. ... Phoenicia was an ancient civilization in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plains of what are now Lebanon and Syria. ...


One notable find at the site is the discovery of a seal of the government official Jehucal, son of Shelemiah, son of Shevi, a figure mentioned twice in the Book of Jeremiah, who presumably lived in the late 7th century BC. Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... Jehucal or Jucal is mentioned in chapters 37 and 38 of the Book of Jeremiah: King Zedekiah sent Jehucal son of Shelemiah and the priest Zephaniah son of Maaseiah to the prophet Jeremiah saying `Please pray for us to the Lord our God` (Chapter 38 verse 3) His seal has... For jer, an alternate spelling for the reduced vowels in Common Slavic, see yer. ... (8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC - other centuries) (700s BC - 690s BC - 680s BC - 670s BC - 660s BC - 650s BC - 640s BC - 630s BC - 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Scythians arrived in Asia Collapse...


The site was dated by the different types of pottery found above and below the building foundations. The layer below has pottery from Iron Age I, while the layer above has pottery from Iron Age II. The history of pottery in Palestine starts in Neolithic times, around the 8th millennium BC, when the art of pottery was introduced into the region. ... The law of superposition is an axiom that forms one of the bases of the sciences of geology, archaeology, and other fields dealing with geological stratigraphy. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ...

Contents


Current progress

The dig is ongoing, but progress is limited by the current occupants of the land atop the ruins. According to the New York Times article referenced below, "Mazar continues to dig, but right now, three families are living in houses where she would most like to explore. One family is Muslim, one Christian and one Jewish." The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


The dig was sponsored by the Shalem Center Institute of Archaeology, where Mazar is a senior fellow.


See also

The archaeology of Israel is a national passion that also attracts considerable international interest on account of the regions Biblical links. ... Biblical archaeology involves the recovery and scientific investigation of the material remains of past cultures that can illuminate the periods and descriptions in the Bible. ...

Publications

  • Mazar, Eilat (2006). Did I Find King David's Palace?. Biblical Archaeology Review 32:1 (January/February): 16-27,70.

External references


  Results from FactBites:
 
Alleged Palace of David site - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (429 words)
The alleged Palace of David site is a large 10th to 9th century BC public building in eastern Jerusalem whose discovery was announced on August 4, 2005 by Israeli archaeologist Eilat Mazar, who identifies it as the palace of the Biblical King David.
The research was funded by a conservative group seeking to confirm aspects of Biblical history, which has led to the skepticism of some archaeologists of the sensational claim of identification, a common criticism of the Biblical archaeology approach.
One notable find at the site is the discovery of a seal of the government official Jehucal, son of Shelemiah, son of Shevi, a figure mentioned twice in the Book of Jeremiah, who presumably lived in the late 7th century BC.
Eilat Mazar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (365 words)
She has worked on the Temple Mount excavations, as well as excavations at Achzib and Bethlehem, and is a visiting scholar with the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
On August 4, 2005, Mazar announced she had discovered in Jerusalem what may have been the palace of the biblical King David, the first king of a united Kingdom of Israel, who ruled from around 1005 to 965 BCE.
Now referred to as the Large Stone structure, Mazar's discovery consists of a public building dated from the 10th century BCE, pottery from the same period, and a bulla, or government seal, of Jerucal, son of Shelemiah, son of Shevi, an official mentioned at least twice in the Book of Jeremiah.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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