FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Allat" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Allat
Myths of the Fertile Crescent
series
Mesopotamian mythology
Ancient Arabian mythology
Ancient Levantine mythology
Pre-Islamic Arabian gods
This box: view  talk  edit

Mentioned in the Qur'an (Sura 53:20), Allāt (a contraction of pre-Arabic *al-ilāhat "the Goddess") was a pre-Islamic Arabian goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. She is one of three goddesses that the pre-Islamic Meccans referred to as "The Daughters of God",but she was also considered the bride or consort of the Father God, Allah. She is mentioned along with ˤUzzā and Manāt in Qur'an Sura 53:19-23. Her name also occurs in earlier Safaitic graffiti (Safaitic han-'Ilāt "the Goddess") and she was worshipped by the Nabataeans of Petra and the people of Hatra, who equated her with the Greek Athena & the Roman Minerva. According to Wellhausen, they believed Allāt was the mother of Hubal (and hence the mother-in-law of Manāt). The Greek historian Herodotus, writing in the 5th century B.C., considers her the equivalent of Aphrodite:"The Assyrians call Aphrodite Mylitta, the Arabians Alilat, and the Persians Mitra" (Histories I:131). According to Herodotus, the ancient Arabians believed in only two gods: "They believe in no other gods except Dionysus and the Heavenly Aphrodite; and they say that they wear their hair as Dionysus does his, cutting it round the head and shaving the temples. They call Dionysus, Orotalt; and Aphrodite, Alilat." (Histories III:38). The Religions of the Ancient Near East were mostly polytheistic, with some early examples of emerging Henotheism (Akhenaton, early Judaism). ... Image File history File links Palm_tree_symbol. ... Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Iraq. ... Arabian mythology is the ancient beliefs of the Arabs. ... In the Levantine pantheon, the Elohim are the sons of El the ancient of days (olam) assembled on the divine holy place, Mount Zephon (Jebel Aqra). ... Arabian mythology is the ancient beliefs of the Arabs. ... Ä’l (אל) is a Northwest Semitic word and name translated into English as either god or God or left untranslated as El, depending on the context. ... Bel, signifying lord or master, is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in Babylonian relgion. ... Abgal is a pre-Islamic north Arabian god, known from the Palmyrian desert regions as a tutelary god of Bedouins and camel drivers. ... Palmyrene deities: from left to right: the lunar god Aglibôl, the supreme god Beelshamên, the sun god Malakbêl, 1st century CE, found near Bir Wereb, Wadi Miyah, Syria, Louvre Museum. ... Astarte on a car with four branches protruding from roof. ... Atargatis, in Aramaic ‘Atar‘atah, was a Syrian deity, more commonly known to the Greeks by a shortened form of the name, Derceto or Derketo (Strabo 16. ... For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... The god Bes. ... Anthem Bilady, Bilady, Bilady Capital (and largest city) Cairo Official languages Arabic1 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Hosni Mubarak  -  Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif Establishment  -  First Dynasty c. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Manāt was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Manaf is one of the pre-Islamic polytheist gods of Mecca [1]. Category: ... The name Nergal (or Nirgal, Nirgali) refers to a deity in Babylonia with the main seat of his cult at Cuthah represented by the mound of Tell-Ibrahim. ... It has been suggested that Nebo (god) be merged into this article or section. ... Al-Qaum (القوم), the Nabataean god of war and the night and guardian of caravans. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Shamash or Sama, was the common Akkadian name of the sun-god in Babylonia and Assyria, corresponding to Sumerian Utu. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), al-Ê•uzzā the Mightiest One (derived from the root Ê•zy) was a pre-Islamic Arabian fertility goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Wadd was the Minaean moon god. ... Yaghuth is an idol referred to in the Quran (71:23) as being worshipped in ancient Yemen. ... According to the Quran, Yauq was a deity worshipped in the days of Noah. ... Palmyrene deities: from left to right: the lunar god Aglibôl, the supreme god Beelshamên, the sun god Malakbêl, 1st century CE, found near Bir Wereb, Wadi Miyah, Syria, Louvre Museum. ... “Fiend” redirects here. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Surat An-Najm (The Star) is the 53rd sura of the Quran with 62 ayat. ... is the Arabic for deity. It is cognate to Northwest Semitic ’ēl and Akkadian ilu. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), al-Ê•uzzā the Mightiest One (derived from the root Ê•zy) was a pre-Islamic Arabian fertility goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Manāt was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Surat An-Najm (The Star) is the 53rd sura of the Quran with 62 ayat. ... Safaitic is the name given to an Old North Arabian dialect, preserved in the form of inscriptions which are written in a type of South Semitic script. ... Petra, the Nabataean capital The Nabataeans, a people of ancient Arabia, whose settlements in the time of Josephus gave the name of Nabatene to the border-land between Syria and Arabia from the Euphrates to the Red Sea. ... Petra (from petra, rock in Greek; Arabic: البتراء, Al-Butrā) is an archaeological site in Jordan, lying in a basin among the mountains which form the eastern flank of Arabah (Wadi Araba), the large valley running from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. ... Hatra (al-aar الحضر) is an ancient ruined city in the former Iranian province of Khvarvaran, today part of Iraq, located at 35°34′ N 42°42′ E. It was an important fortified city of the Iranian Parthian Empire, and withstood repeated attacks by the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... Hubal (هبل) was a god worshipped in pagan Arabia, notably at Mecca before the arrival of Islam. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Manāt was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“rodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب) are a heterogenous ethnic group who are predominantly speakers of the Arabic language, mainly found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... *mitra (Proto-Indo-Iranian, nominative *mitras) was an important Indo-Iranian divinity. ... The Histories of Herodotus of Halicarnassus is considered the first work of history in Western literature. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... The Histories of Herodotus of Halicarnassus is considered the first work of history in Western literature. ...


According to the Book of Idols (Kitab al-Asnām) by Hishām b. al-Kalbi, the pre-Islamic Arabs believed Allāt resided in the Ka'ba and also had a stone statue form in the sanctuary. B. al-Kalbi writes (N.A. Faris 1952, pp. 14-15): Hisham Ibn Al-Kalbi, full name Mundbir Hishkm ibn Mahommed ibn us-Sgib ul-Kalbi (- ca. ... The Kaaba or Kaabah, is a building located inside the mosque known as Masjid al Haram in Mecca (Makkah). ...

Her custody was in the hands of the Banū-Attāb ibn-Mālik of the Thaqīf, who had built an edifice over her. The Quraysh, as well as all the Arabs, were wont to venerate Allāt. They also used to name their children after her, calling them Zayd-Allāt and Taym-Allāt. [...] Allāt continued to be venerated until the Thaqīf embraced Islam, when the Apostle of God dispatched al-Mughīrah ibn-Shuˤbah, who destroyed her and burnt her temple to the ground.

According to the story of the Satanic Verses found in early Islamic histories such as at-Tabari, al-Lat, along with Manāt and ˤUzzā, was one of the gharaniq, the "high flying cranes", goddesses whose intercession was to be desired alongside that of Allah. The Thaqif were a tribe originally from the city of Taif in Arabia, that played an important part in early islamic history. ... Quraish (sura) is also the name of a Surah in the Quran. ... The Thaqif were a tribe originally from the city of Taif in Arabia, that played an important part in early islamic history. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... For the novel by Salman Rushdie, see The Satanic Verses. ... Balamis 14th century Persian version of Universal History by al-Tabari Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari 838–923 (father of Jafar, named Muhammad, son of Jarir from the province of Tabaristan, Arabic الطبري), was an author from Persia, one of the earliest, most prominent and famous Persian... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Manāt was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), al-Ê•uzzā the Mightiest One (derived from the root Ê•zy) was a pre-Islamic Arabian fertility goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


This story was the inspiration for Salman Rushdie's controversial The Satanic Verses, which in effect re-tell the history of the Prophet Muhammad and the beginnings of Islam. The goddess is depicted as taking revenge on the Prophet for having dethroned her and excluded her from the new religion. Ahmed Salman Rushdie KBE (Hindi: Urdu: سلمان رشدی; born 19 June 1947) is a British-Indian novelist and essayist. ... For the verses known as Satanic Verses, see Satanic Verses. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


See also

Thaqif was a a tribe that lived in the city of Taif and worshiped the pre-Islamic Arabian goddess Allat. ...

References

  • Ibn al-Kalbī (Translation and Commentary by Nabih Amin Faris) (1952). Book of Idols, Being a Translation from the Arabic of the Kitāb al-Asnām. Princeton University Press. Library of Congress #52006741. 
  • Herodotus (Translated by David Grene) (1987). The History. Chicago University Press. ISBN 0-226-32770-1. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Allah, Divine or Demonic? Chapter Fifteen (2244 words)
Allat is called "lover of Baal," and in Ras Shamrs Allat is identified as the goddess of war.
From ancient days when Allat was derived from the original goddess, Ninlil, her symbol was the serpent (phallus) and the mountain and stars.
Even the sexual symbolism of Allat is retained as the Catholic artists of the post-Constantinian era immediately began painting Mary with baby Jesus on her lap with her breast hanging out.
Allat (418 words)
By Allat and all the sacred baetyls (ansab)[12],
Allat continued to be venerated until the Thaqif embraced Islam[14], when the Apostle of God dispatched al-Mughirah ibn-Shu'bab[15], who destroyed her and burnt her [temple] to the ground[16].
In this connection, when Allat was destroyed and burnt to the ground, Shaddid ibn-'Arid al-Jushami'[17] said warning the Thaqif not to return to her worship nor attempt to avenge her destruction:
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m