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Encyclopedia > Allah
See also: Islamic concept of God

Islam
Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ...



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Beliefs
Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ...

Allah - Oneness of God
Muhammad · Prophets of Islam This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Allah. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets. ...

Practices

Profession of Faith · Prayer
Fasting · Charity · Pilgrimage Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ... The shahadah (Arabic:  ) is the Islamic creed. ... For the Indian village, see Salat, Kulpahar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... The Hajj (Arabic: ‎, transliteration: ; Turkish: ; Ottoman Turkish: حاج, Hāc; Malay: , Bosnian: ) is the Pilgrimage to Mecca in Islam. ...

History & Leaders
Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first purported visions in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ...

Timeline of Muslim history
Ahl al-Bayt · Sahaba
Rashidun Caliphs · Shia Imams There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ‎) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in both Sunni and Shia Islam to refer to the rightly guided Caliphs prophesised in the famous tradition, Hold firmly to my example (sunnah) and that of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (Ibn Majah, Abu Dawood). ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ...

Texts & Laws
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ...

Qur'an · Sunnah · Hadith
Fiqh · Sharia · Kalam · Tasawwuf This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Rule of sharia be merged into this article or section. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition that found a home in Islam and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to Allah, divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ...

Major branches
The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ...

Sunni · Shia

Culture & Society
Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ...

Academics · Art · Science
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Mosques · Calendar · Festivals
Demographics · Women · Politics Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... The term Islamic art denotes the arts produced from the 7th century onwards by people (not necessarily Muslim) who lived within the territory that was inhabited by culturally Islamic populations. ... This is a subarticle to Islamic studies and science. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: گاه‌شماری هجري قمری ‎ Gāhshomāri-ye hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to... Friday is an important day in the life of a Muslim and it is believed that any devotional acts done on this day gain a higher reward. ... Distribution of Islam per country. ... Most commentary on gender and politics in the Middle East and Muslim world assigns a central place to Islam, but there is little agreement about the analytic weight Islam carries on the topic of women in Islam, accounting for the subordination of women or the role it plays in relation... - - - Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ...

See also

Criticism of Islam · Islamophobia
Glossary of Islamic terms Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages, as with many other religions, on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights · Gay rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Mens rights Childrens rights · Youth rights Disability... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ...

view
Arabic
اﷲ
Transliteration
Allāh
Translation
God

Allah is the Arabic language word for "God." The term is best known in the West for its use in the Muslim holy book the Qur'an. Arabic-speakers of all faiths, including Christians and Jews, use the word "Allah" to mean "God". Consequently, the word is used in Arabic translations of the Tanakh and the Gospels. The Bahá'í Faith, whose scriptures are primarily written in Arabic and Persian, also uses Allāh to mean God, though typical practice is to use the customary word for God in the language being spoken. Other languages that also use the word or derivates of it, such as Indonesian and Turkish, also use it in translations of the Christian Bible. Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Due to the fact that the Arabic language has a number of phonemes that have no equivalent in English or other European languages, a number of different transliteration methods have been invented to represent certain Arabic characters, due to various conflicting goals. ... Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ... Tanakh (Hebrew: ‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak, is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... Seat of the Universal House of Justice in Haifa, Israel, governing body of the Baháís The Baháí Faith is a religion founded by Baháulláh in 19th century Persia. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ...


In Islam, Allah is the one and only God 112:1, the supreme Creator, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as well as of Moses, Jesus and Muhammad. Islamic scholars often translate "Allāh" directly into English as "God." This is consistent with the word's etymological derivation (see Etymology below). However, some Islamic scholars infer that "Allāh" should not be translated, arguing that "Allāh" as used in Islam is a special and glorified term whose use should be preserved. This is a significant issue when translating the Qur'an. For information on the racehorse, see Ibrahim (horse) (Arabic: ), the biblical patriarch Abraham, is an important prophet in Islam, son of Azar, and the father of the Prophet Ismail (Ishmael), his firstborn son, who is considered the Father of the Arabs. ... Ishaq (Arabic إسحق) is a prophet of Islam mentioned in the Quran. ... Yaqub (in Syriac: ܝܰܥܩܽܘܒ) is a common Syriac and Arabic name. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Islam holds Jesus (Arabic: ‎ `Īsā) to have been a messenger and a prophet of God. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Islamic scholars are Muslim and non-Muslim scholars who work in one or more fields of Islamic studies. ... Translations of the Qurán are interpretations of the holy book of Islam in languages other than Arabic. ...


According to F. E. Peters, "The Qur'an insists, Muslims believe, and historians affirm that Muhammad and his followers worship the same God as the Jews. 29:46 The Quran's Allah is the same Creator God who covenanted with Abraham". Peters states that the Qur'an portrays Allah as both more powerful and more remote than Yahweh, and as a universal deity, unlike Yahweh who closely follows Israelites.[1] F.E. Peters is Professor of Middle Eastern Studies, History, and Religion at New York University. ...


According to the tradition of Islam there are 99 Names of God. They are synonyms that appear in the Qur'an.[2] // The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ...

Contents

Etymology

Various theories are proposed regarding the etymology of the word "Allah". One is that the word Allāh (الله) is derived from a contraction of the Arabic words al- (the) and ʾilāh (deity, masculine form) — al-ilāh meaning "the God", which is the most likely. Another theory traces the etymology of the word to the Aramaic Alāhā.[3] Al- is not a permanent component of words, as shown here with , the Arabic for Bahrain. ... is the Arabic for deity. It is cognate to Northwest Semitic ’ēl and Akkadian ilu. ... Aramaic is a group of Semitic languages with a 3,000-year history. ...


Cognates of the name "Allāh" exist in other Semitic languages, including Hebrew and Aramaic.[4] Cognates are words that have a common origin. ... 14th century BC diplomatic letter in Akkadian, found in Tell Amarna. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Aramaic is a group of Semitic languages with a 3,000-year history. ...


Muslim and non-Muslim scholars often translate "Allāh" directly into English as "God"; and Arabic-speaking Jews and Christians refer to God using the Arabic word Allah. However, some Muslim scholars feel that "Allāh" should not be translated, because they perceive the Arabic word to express the uniqueness of "Allāh" more accurately than the word "god" for two reasons: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

  • The word "god" can take a plural form "gods", whereas the word "Allāh" has no plural form.
  • The word "god" can have gender as male god or female god (called goddess) whereas the word "Allāh" does not have gender.[5]

This is a significant issue in translation of the Qur'an. Translations of the Qurán are interpretations of the holy book of Islam in languages other than Arabic. ...


The word "Allāh" had been used in the Arabic tongue in the pre-Islamic period, which Muslims call Jāhilīyah; it occurs in Arabic classical poetry and was also used by Jews in certain regions (for cognate Hebrew Elōah). Jahiliyyah is an Islamic concept referring to the spiritual condition of pre-Islamic Arabian society. ... Eloah (אלוה) is Hebrew for a god. Its plural Elohim (אלוהים) literally means Gods (plural), but is very often used as a singular as a name of God. ...


Typography

An example of allāh written in simple Arabic calligraphy.
An example of allāh written in simple Arabic calligraphy.

The word Allāh is always written without an alif to spell the ā vowel. This is because the spelling was settled before Arabic spelling started habitually using alif to spell ā. However, in vocalized spelling, a small diacritic alif is added on top of the shaddah to indicate the pronunciation. Image File history File links Allah. ... Image File history File links Allah. ... The stylized signature of Sultan Abdul Hamid I of the Ottoman Empire was written in an expressive calligraphy. ... Alif ﺍ is the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. ... Alif ﺍ is the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. ... Ù‘ shadda marks the gemination (doubling) of a consonant. ...


One exception may be in the pre-Islamic Zabad inscription, where it ends with an ambiguous sign that may be a lone-standing h with a lengthened start, or may be a non-standard conjoined l-h:- If certain characters in this article display badly (as empty squares, question marks, etc), see Unicode. ...

  • as الاه : This reading would be Allāh spelled phonetically with alif for the ā.
  • as الاله : This reading would be Al-'ilāh = "the god", uncontracted, by older spelling practice without alif for ā.

The form in the inscription is shown at.[6]


Unicode has a glyph reserved for Allāh, = U+FDF2, which can be combined with an alif to yield the post-consonantal form, اﷲ, as opposed to the full spelling alif-lām-lām-hā الله which may be rendered slightly differently, in particular featuring a diacritic alif on top of the shadda. In this, Unicode imitates traditional Arabic typesetting, which also frequently featured special llāh types. Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ... variant glyphs representing the character a (allographs of a) in the Zapfino typeface. ...


In Abjad numerals, numeric value of الله is 66. The Abjad numerals are a decimal numeral system which was used in the Arabic-speaking world prior to the use of the Hindu-Arabic numerals from the 8th century, and in parallel with the latter until Modern times. ... 66 is the natural number following 65 and preceding 67. ...


The calligraphic variant of the word used as the Coat of arms of Iran is encoded in Unicode, in the Miscellaneous Symbols range, at codepoint U+262B (). Irans coat of arms The coat of arms of Iran features a stylized Arabic script of the word Allahu Akbar (God is great. ... Unicode is an industry standard designed to allow text and symbols from all of the writing systems of the world to be consistently represented and manipulated by computers. ... The Miscellaneous Symbol plane of Unicode (2600–26FF) contains various glyphs representing things from a variety of categories: Astrological, Astronomical, Chess, Dice, Ideological symbols, Musical notation, Political symbols, Recycling, Religious symbols, Trigrams, Warning Signs and Weather. ...


For further reading, see Arabic name#Mistakes made by Europeans and other non-Arabs. The stylized signature of Sultan Mahmud II of the Ottoman Empire. ...


History

Allah script outside Eski Cami (The Old Mosque) in Edirne, Turkey.
Allah script outside Eski Cami (The Old Mosque) in Edirne, Turkey.

The pre-Islamic Arabs believed in a host of other terms to signify gods, such as Hubal and al-Lāt, al-`Uzzah, and Manah.[7] Pre-Islamic Jews referred to their supreme creator as Yahweh or Elohim. This view of Allāh by the pre-Islamic pagans is viewed by Muslims as a later development having arisen as a result of moving away from Abrahamic monotheism over time since the building of the Kaaba. The Qur'an transmits a rebuttal to this common belief at the time in the verse "17:40 Has then your Lord (O Pagans!) preferred for you sons, and taken for Himself daughters among the angels? Truly ye utter a most dreadful saying!". Secular historians, meanwhile, have postulated that monotheism is the result of an evolution from henotheism, the belief in a supreme deity as well as various lesser divinities. (See Judaism.) The pagan Arabians also used the word "Allāh" in the names of their children; Muhammad's father, who was born into pagan society, was named "Abdullāh", which translates "servant of Allāh". "Abdullāh" is still used for names of Muslim and non-Muslims (e.g. Christians also used the word, as testified by the Zabad inscription). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (592x896, 159 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Allah Edirne Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (592x896, 159 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Allah Edirne Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Selimiye Mosque, built by Sinan in 1575 Edirne (Greek: Αδριανούπολη, Bulgarian: Одрин) is a city in Thrace, the westernmost part of Turkey, close to the borders with Greece and Bulgaria. ... Hubal (هبل) was a god worshipped in pagan Arabia, notably at Mecca before the arrival of Islam. ... Al-Lat was a pre-Islamic Arabian fertility goddess. ... Until Muhammad ended polytheism in Arabia, a wide variety of gods were believed in. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Manāt was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Phoenician silver drachm from ca. ... Elohim (אֱלוֹהִים , אלהים) is a Hebrew word which expresses concepts of divinity. ... In theology, monotheism (Greek μόνος(monos) = single and θεός(theos) = God) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ) , also known as (), ( ‎ The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Henotheism (Greek heis theos one god) is a term coined by Max Müller, to mean devotion to a single God while accepting the existence of other gods. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Hebrew word for deity, El (אל) or Elōah (אלוה), was used as an Old Testament synonym for the Tetragrammaton (יהוה), which is the proper name of God according to the Hebrew Bible. The Aramaic word for God is alôh-ô (Syriac dialect) or elâhâ (Biblical dialect), which comes from the same Proto-Semitic word (*ʾilâh-) as the Arabic and Hebrew terms; Jesus is described in Mark 15:34 as having used the word on the cross, with the ending meaning "my", when saying, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" (transliterated in Greek as elō-i). “Hebrew” redirects here. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... It has been suggested that Yahweh be merged into this article or section. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish term) or Old Testament (Christian term). ... Aramaic is a Semitic language with a four-thousand year history. ... Syriac is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... 14th century BC diplomatic letter in Akkadian, found in Tell Amarna. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Gospel of Mark (anonymous[1] but ascribed to Mark the Evangelist) is a Gospel of the New Testament. ...


One of the earliest surviving translations of the word Allāh into a foreign language is in a Greek translation of the Shahada, from 86-96 AH (705-715 AD), which translates it as ho theos monos,[8] literally "the one god". Also the cognate Aramaic term appears in the Aramaic version of the New Testament, called the Pshitta (or Peshitta) as one of the words Jesus used to refer to God, e.g., in the sixth Beatitude, "Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see Alaha." And in the Arabic Bible the same words: "طُوبَى لأَنْقِيَاءِ الْقَلْبِ، فَإِنَّهُمْ سَيَرَوْنَ الله" There is also a town called Shāhāda, which is now in Nandurbār district (formerly in Dhule district) in the northwest corner of Maharashtra state in India. ... Alternate meaning: Area code 705 Events End of the short-lived Zhou Dynasty in China Umayyad caliph Abd al-Malik succeeded by al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik. ... Events August 11 - Germanus is translated from the bishopric of Cyzicus to the Patriarch of Constantinople Umayyad caliph al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik succeeded by Sulayman ibn Abd al-Malik End of the reign of Empress Gemmei of Japan, she is succeeded by Empress Gensho. ... Aramaic is a Semitic language with a four-thousand year history. ... The Peshitta is the standard version of the Bible in the Syriac language. ... The Beatitudes (from Latin, beatitudo, happiness) is the name given to the well-known, definitive and beginning portion of the Sermon on the Mount of the Gospel of Matthew. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ilah. ...


Debates in popular media

A common debate between Muslim, Christian, and Jewish religious communities is the "identity" of the deity that they worship. The Qur'an states that Jews and Christians are considered People of the Book meaning that it regards the Torah and the Gospels, like the Qur'an, as revelations from the God of Abraham. This is interpreted by some to mean that these faiths all worship the same deity. Others conclude that, because the beliefs each group has about their deity are so different from the others' beliefs, the deities are in fact different (in which case one religious group may argue that the others serve a false deity). The terms "God" and "Allah" are often both used in popular religious media to distinguish between the belief systems. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... The term People of the Book (Hebrew עם הספר, Am HaSefer) is used in Judaism where it refers specifically to the Jewish people and the Torah. ... Tora redirects here. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... Map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ...


While it is customary for people to use the word in their own language for "God," e.g. the Japanese use "神 kami," and French language uses “Dieu”, a feverish debate about reference to "God" in the Tanakh and the Gospels using the Arabic Qur'an term "Allāh" has been waged in the aftermath of September 11th (begun in the United States and followed by repercussions in Western Europe).[citation needed] French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Tanakh (Hebrew: ‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak, is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... A common post-WWII understanding of Western Europe Western Europe in its most common understanding is a socio-political concept coined and used during the Cold War. ...


Allah outside Islam

Most Arabic-speaking Christian and Jewish Communities (including the Yemenite Jews, several Mizraḥi communities and some Sephardim) use "Allāh" as the proper noun for "God". Eastern Christians living in Muslim countries such as Turkey's Armenians use the word 'Allah' as the proper noun for "God". The name's origin can be traced back to the earliest Semitic writings in which the word for god was Il or El, the latter being an Old Testament synonym for Yahweh. Allah is the standard Arabic word for “God” and is used by Arab Christians as well.[9] Yemenite Jews (תֵּימָנִי, Standard Hebrew Temani, Tiberian Hebrew Têmānî; plural תֵּימָנִים, Standard Hebrew Temanim, Tiberian Hebrew Têmānîm) are those Jews who live, or whose recent ancestors lived, in Yemen (תֵּימָן far south, Standard Hebrew Teman, Tiberian Hebrew Têmān), on the southern tip of the Arabian peninsula. ... Languages Hebrew, Dzhidi, Judæo-Arabic, Gruzinic, Bukhori, Judeo-Berber, Juhuri and Judæo-Aramaic Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and other Jewish ethnic divisions Mizrahi Jews, or Mizrahim (מזרחי Easterner, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ; plural מזרחים Easterners, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) sometimes also called Edot HaMizrah (Congregations... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ... Armenians in Turkey (Turkish: ; Armenian: , the latter meaning Istanbul-Armenian) have an estimated population of 40,000 (1995) to 70,000. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... Phoenician silver drachm from ca. ...


Because of the centuries long Muslim presence in the Iberian Peninsula, the words ojalá and oxalá today exist in the Spanish and Portuguese languages, respectively, borrowed from Arabic by way of Mozarabic. These words literally mean "God willing" (in the sense of "I hope so"). Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ... InshaAllah (ان شاء الله ) is an Arabic phrase evoked by Muslims to indicate hope for an aforementioned event to occur in the future. ... InshaAllah (ان شاء الله ) is an Arabic phrase evoked by Muslims to indicate hope for an aforementioned event to occur in the future. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Mozarabic was a continuum of closely related Iberian Romance dialects spoken in Muslim dominated areas of the Iberian Peninsula during the early stages of Romance languages development in Iberia. ...


See also

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Allah
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Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 Attributes of God (Arabic: ‎ transliteration: ), are the names of God revealed in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In Islamic context, an Ilah is the concept of a deity, lord or god and does not necessarily refer to Allah. ... Elohim (אֱלוֹהִים , אלהים) is a Hebrew word which expresses concepts of divinity. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Termagant, in European fantasy, was the fictional name given to a supposed deity worshipped by Muslims. ...

External links

Bibliography

  • Samuel M. Zwemep - The Moslem Doctrine of God (Originally published in 1905) ISBN 1-84664-478-X
  • Ian Richard Netton - Allah Transcendent (1994) ISBN 0-7007-0287-3

References and notes

  1. ^ F.E. Peters, Islam, p.4, Princeton University Press, 2003
  2. ^ Bentley, David (Sept. 1999). The 99 Beautiful Names for God for All the People of the Book. William Carey Library. ISBN 0-87808-299-9. 
  3. ^ Encyclopaedia of Islam, Allah
  4. ^ Columbia Encyclopaedia says: Derived from an old Semitic root referring to the Divine and used in the Canaanite El, the Mesopotamian ilu, and the biblical Elohim, the word Allah is used by all Arabic-speaking Muslims, Christians, Jews, and others.
  5. ^ Concept of God in Islam
  6. ^ Zebed Inscription: A Pre-Islamic Trilingual Inscription In Greek, Syriac & Arabic From 512 CE. Islamic Awareness (March 17, 2005).
  7. ^ Encyclopaedia of World Mythology and Legend, "The Facts on File", ed. Anthony Mercatante, New York, 1983, I:61
  8. ^ A Bilingual Papyrus Of A Protocol - Egyptian National Library Inv. No. 61, 86-96 AH [1]
  9. ^ Allah. Britannica.com.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Allah - definition of Allah - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (992 words)
The word Allah is not specific to Islam; Arab Christians and Jews, and the Catholic Maltese, also use it to refer to the monotheist deity; for example in Arabic translations of the Bible.
Allah is considered eternal and "uncreated", whereas everything else in the universe is "created." The Quran describes Him in Sura 112: "Say: He is Allah, Singular.
Muslims believe that the name of Allah has existed since the time of Adam, since they believe their deity to be the same one worshipped by Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, Muhammad and other prophets of Islam.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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