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Encyclopedia > All the President's Men (film)
All the President's Men

original movie poster
Directed by Alan J. Pakula
Produced by Walter Coblenz
Written by William Goldman
Based on book by
Bob Woodward
Carl Bernstein
Starring Robert Redford
Dustin Hoffman
Jack Warden
Jason Robards
Hal Holbrook
Music by David Shire
Cinematography Gordon Willis
Editing by Robert L. Wolfe
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) 4 April 1976 (USA)
Running time 138 min.
Country USA
Language English
Budget US$8,500,000
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

All the President's Men is a 1976 film based on the 1974 non-fiction book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the two journalists investigating the Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. The film adaptation starred Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Woodward and Bernstein, respectively; it was produced by Walter Coblenz and directed by Alan J. Pakula. Image File history File links 12734GF4. ... Alan Jay Pakula (April 7, 1928 - November 19, 1998) was an American film producer, writer and director noted for his contributions to the conspiracy thriller genre. ... William Goldman (born August 12, 1931) is an American novelist, playwright and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Jack Warden (September 18, 1920 – July 19, 2006) was an American actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Holbrook as Twain, 1957. ... David Shire David Shire (born July 3, 1937) is an American songwriter and the composer of stage musicals and film and television scores. ... Gordon Willis (born May 28, 1931 in Queens, New York) is a highly respected Hollywood cinematographer best known for his work on the The Godfather series and on some of Woody Allens most popular films. ... Warner Bros. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Cover of 2005 printing All the Presidents Men is a 1974 non-fiction book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, the two journalists investigating the Watergate first break-in and ensuing Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... ... A biological adaptation is an anatomical structure, physiological process or behavioral trait of an organism that has evolved over a period of time by the process of natural selection such that it increases the expected long-term reproductive success of the organism. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Alan Jay Pakula (April 7, 1928 - November 19, 1998) was an American film producer, writer and director noted for his contributions to the conspiracy thriller genre. ...

Contents

Plot

The book was adapted for the screen by William Goldman. The story chronicles the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporting of Woodward and Bernstein from the former's initial report on the Watergate break-in through the resignations of H. R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, and the revelation of the Nixon tapes by Alexander Butterfield in 1973. It relates the events behind the major stories the duo wrote for the Post, naming some sources who had previously refused to be identified for their initial articles, notably Hugh Sloan. It also gives detailed accounts of Woodward's secret meetings with his source Deep Throat whose identity was kept secret for over 30 years. Only in 2005 was Deep Throat revealed to be former FBI Associate Director W. Mark Felt. William Goldman (born August 12, 1931) is an American novelist, playwright and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Public Service has been awarded since 1918 for a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper through the use of its journalistic resources which may include editorials, cartoons, and photographs, as well as reporting. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... H.R. Haldeman, January 21, 1971. ... John D. Ehrlichman as Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs, May 13, 1969. ... The Watergate tapes, also known as the Nixon tapes, are a collection of conversations between President Nixon and various White House staff members, recorded on the White House taping system and White House dictabelts. ... Alexander Porter Butterfield (born April 6, 1926) was the deputy assistant to Richard Nixon from 1969 until 1973. ... Hugh W. Sloan, Jr. ... Deep Throat is the pseudonym that was given to William Mark Felt, Sr. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), serving as both a federal criminal investigative body and a domestic intelligence agency. ... William Mark Felt, Sr. ...


Production

According to Redford, they tried to film in the actual Washington Post newsroom, but it proved impossible because many Post employees were too aware of the camera, and some even tried to "act." Some employees would disappear into restrooms and apply make up. The production team recreated the facility at a Burbank, California studio for a reported $450,000. However, Frank Wills, the Watergate security guard who first discovered the break-in, played himself in the film. Burbank is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Frank Wills (February 4, 1948 – September 27, 2000) was the security guard who uncovered the break in that led to the Watergate scandal. ...


Some scenes in the film use dioptric lenses, which allow a "split screen" effect on a single take: each half of a shot can have its own focal length (that is, a man in the foreground can be in focus, yet on the other side of the frame, a man in the background can also be in focus--with objects between the two of them out of focus). Use of a dioptric lens requires a sharp dividing line to hide the effect; All the President's Men typically used pillars and desks for dividing lines.


The film also is an early film to make extensive use of different color temperatures in the same shot: for instance, at the beginning during the break-in, the light from inside is noticeably orange, whereas the light from outside is noticeably blue. Color temperature is a characteristic of visible light that has important applications in photography, videography, publishing and other fields. ...


Differences from the book

Unlike the book, the film itself only covers the first seven months of the Watergate scandal, from the time of the break-in to Nixon's inauguration on January 20th, 1973. A series of teletype headlines then tell the rest of the story. Although the headlines cover a period through 1975, they are not shown in strict chronological order, so as to end with the dramatic announcement of Nixon's resignation in August, 1974.


Ethical Dimensions

Sometimes this film is assigned in journalism ethics classes for the heavily-disputed ethical dilemma of using anonymous sources when they are central to the reporting of a story. Revealing the Watergate scandal in its entirety would have been impossible without the help of Deep Throat. Furthermore, much of the information gained from government officials was put printed unattached to the name of its provider. To continue moving the investigation forward, the promise of anonymity had to be made, but outside of a case connected with high ups that rise all the way to the President, how can the use of anonymous sources be deemed necessary and ethical?


The use of unnamed sources usually occurs in light of extraordinary circumstances when no other way can be found disclose information to the public that is crucial to their well being. In addition, for most papers to quote or use anonymous sources, other requirements usually need to be met. In a letter sent out to all AP associated papers in 2005, Mike Silverman and Kathleen Carroll, AP Managing Editor and AP Executive Editor, respectively, reminded news staffs across the country that AP policies state anonymous sources are only to be used when the information provided is fact and not opinion; the information is not available unless anonymity can be provided; and the source is in a position to provide credible information. Furthermore, when anonymous sources are used, an explanation to the readers must be given to describe the reasoning behind using unnamed sources in order to prevent any damage to the reputation of journalism's credibility.


Even with these requirements, about one in four editors around the country said, in response to a survey done by the AP and the APME, that they won't use anonymous sources under any conditions because it promotes the use of incredible information. To escape the dagger of incredibility, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein used secondary sources to backup the information given by anonymous sources. This practice has become the benchmark in contemporary journalism in getting the okay from editors to use unnamed sources. Another practice that gives credibility to an anonymous source based information is inserting an appropriate and honest representative title to replace the name of the unnamed source--such as "a Senior Official said..."


Awards

It won Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Jason Robards), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Best Sound and Best Adapted Screenplay. It was nominated for Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Jane Alexander), Best Director, Best Film Editing and Best Picture. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Jane Alexander (born October 28, 1939), is an award-winning American actress, a former director of the National Endowment for the Arts, and an author. ... The Academy Award for Directing is an accolade given to the person that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences feels was best director of the past year. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ...


According to Box Office Mojo.com, the film earned a "Domestic Total Gross" of $70,600,000.


In 2007, it was added to the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition) list at #77. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with AFIs 100 Years. ...


Cast

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
All the President's Men (film)

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ... Jack Warden (September 18, 1920 – July 19, 2006) was an American actor. ... Harry M. Rosenfeld (born circa 1928) is an American newspaper editor, who was the editor in charge of local news at The Washington Post during the Watergate scandal who oversaw the newspapers coverage of Watergate and resisted efforts by the papers national reporters to take over the story. ... Martin Henry Balsam (November 4, 1919 – February 13, 1996) was an American actor. ... This page is about the Washington Post editor. ... Holbrook as Twain, 1957. ... W. Mark Felt, on the set of CBSs Face the Nation in 1976. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (born August 26, 1921) is the vice president of The Washington Post. ... Jane Alexander (born October 28, 1939), is an award-winning American actress, a former director of the National Endowment for the Arts, and an author. ... Meredith Baxter (born June 21, 1947 in South Pasadena, California) is an American actress. ... Ned Thomas Beatty (born July 6, 1937) is an Academy Award-nominated American character actor. ... Stephen Collins (born October 1, 1947) is an American actor. ... Hugh W. Sloan, Jr. ... Penny Fuller (born July 21, 1940) is an American actress. ... Robert Walden (born Robert Wolkowitz on September 25, 1943 in New York, New York) is an American television and motion picture actor. ... Segretti during the Watergate hearings. ...

External links

  • All the President's Men at the Internet Movie Database
  • Washington Post's retrospective article
  • Post article on the film crew visiting their offices
  • Screenplay by William Goldman from iscriptdb.com
  • Review of DVD of film

 
 

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