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Encyclopedia > All Star Batman and Robin
All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder


Composite cover to All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder #1,
by Jim Lee and Scott Williams. Image File history File links Allstarbatmanandrobin01. ... Fantastic Four #1 (1996) cover by Jim Lee. ... Scott Williams is an American comic book artist and inker. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Erratic
Format Ongoing
Publication dates July 2005 – present
Main character(s) Batman
Robin
Creative team
Writer(s) Frank Miller
Penciller(s) Jim Lee
Inker(s) Scott Williams
Colourist(s) Alex Sinclair

All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder is an ongoing comic book series from DC Comics. It was launched in July 2005. The first story arc is written by Frank Miller and pencilled by Jim Lee; it remains to be seen whether this creative team will stay aboard for a second arc. DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still sometimes as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Richard John Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Frank Miller in an interview about the Batman character. ... Fantastic Four #1 (1996) cover by Jim Lee. ... Scott Williams is an American comic book artist and inker. ... Alex Sinclair is a colorist who has worked in the comics industry. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Frank Miller in an interview about the Batman character. ... Fantastic Four #1 (1996) cover by Jim Lee. ...


This is the first series to be launched in 2005 under DC's All Star imprint, the second being All Star Superman. A third series, All Star Wonder Woman, will debut in the near future. These series are helmed by renowned writers and artists in the American comic book industry and attempt to retell some of the history of prominent DC Universe characters, but outside of strict DC Universe continuity. This article is about the 2005 DC Comics imprint. ... In the publishing industry, an imprint is a brand name under which a work is published. ... All Star Superman, launched in November 2005, is an ongoing comic book series featuring Superman, written by Grant Morrison, drawn by Frank Quitely, and published by DC Comics. ... The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ... The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ...


The first issue of All Star Batman and Robin was the highest-selling comic book of 2005, with sales outperforming the first issues of that year's big crossover-event books from both DC Comics (Infinite Crisis) and Marvel Comics (House of M).[citation needed] Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics. ... House of M is an eight-part Marvel Comics crossover event which began in June of 2005. ...

Contents

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Story

The first story arc is Frank Miller's version of the origin of Batman's sidekick, Robin.

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Plot outline

In the first two issues, Bruce Wayne and Vicki Vale go on a date to the circus, where one of the feature acts is "The Flying Graysons," an acrobatic family consisting of twelve-year-old Dick Grayson and his parents. When Dick's parents are shot to death by a hit man, he is escorted from the scene by several Gotham City policemen in a threatening manner. Vicki, suspicious of the police conduct, chases after them in Alfred Pennyworth's car, with Alfred at her side. For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Vicki Vale is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a reporter who was once a love interest of Bruce Wayne and his alter-ego, Batman. ... Richard John Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man) is a hired assassin, often by organized crime. ... The Gotham City Police Department (GCPD) is a fictional police department servicing the city of Gotham City in the DC Universe. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ...


Bruce Wayne, who has now changed garb into Batman, fends off a gang of thugs nearby, then tracks down the police and Dick Grayson, and speeds away with the boy. A fleet of police vehicles pursue the Batmobile with orders to kill Batman. Alfred's car is caught in an accident amid this chaos and Vicki Vale is seriously injured. Alfred manages to escape unharmed and helps her from the wreck. In the Batmobile, Batman confronts Dick with a barrage of harsh words calculated to provoke the traumatized boy from lapsing into a state of grieving. The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ...


The third issue focuses mainly on the character of Black Canary in a flashback taking place six months prior, where her behavior is portrayed as violent and wild, expressing an as-yet-unknown interest in locating Batman. Following this backstory sequence, the issue returns to the present, with Batman and Dick Grayson en route to the Batcave. Meanwhile in Metropolis, Clark Kent — alias Superman — becomes enraged after reading an article in the Daily Planet regarding Batman's kidnapping of the young Grayson. Black Canary is a female superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Superman and his secret identity Clark Kent being portrayed as distinct individuals. ... Superman is a fictional character and one of the most famous and popular comic book superheroes of all time. ... The Daily Planet is a fictional newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ...


In issue four, Batman introduces Dick Grayson to the Batcave. Dick remains unimpressed; when he asks for something to eat, Batman coldly tells him to stake out the vermin infesting the cave for sustenance. Alfred informs Batman that Vicki Vale is in critical condition at Gotham hospital. Batman knows of a doctor in Paris who may be able to save her. Via Alfred, he sends an anonymous message to Clark Kent at the Daily Planet, the content of which reveals an awareness of Superman's secret identity, thus blackmailing his assistance to swiftly retrieve the doctor from Paris and flying him to Gotham. Dick Grayson, having refused to debase himself by dining on rodents as advised, is offered a cheeseburger (with fries) by Alfred's compassion. As a result, Alfred and Batman get into a heated argument in which Batman handles Alfred roughly. Alfred boldly declares to his employer, "Sir, I am your butler. I am your aide. I am your medic. I am not, however, your slave. Unhand me." Complying, Batman grumbles that "this little brat is going to ruin everything."

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Covers

The first issue launched with two different covers by Jim Lee, one sporting Batman, the other Robin. Since then, Frank Miller has drawn variant covers for the series. With the exception of issue #2, the Miller covers are far rarer than Lee's, and may therefore fetch a higher price among comic book collectors.


The logos for All Star Batman & Robin and All Star Superman were designed by Chip Kidd, who, during a March 28, 2006 lecture held at the Walker Art Center[1], expressed his dislike for the cover artwork of the first issues of All-Star Superman and All-Star Batman & Robin (though his criticism was based on the preliminary composite design, not the final version with individual covers for Batman and Robin). Chip Kidd (born Shillington, Pennsylvania in 1964) is an American graphic designer. ...

[edit]

All Star continuity

The All Star titles are self-contained story arcs existing outside of official DC Comics continuity. Despite sharing a label with Grant Morrison's All Star Superman and Geoff Johns's upcoming All Star Batgirl, All Star Batman & Robin is unique and unrelated.[2] Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960, Glasgow) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Geoff Johns at a book signing at Midtown Comics East on 24 June 2004 in New York City. ...


Miller has also stated that All Star Batman & Robin does exist in the same continuity as the other storylines in his "Dark Knight Universe". This consists of Miller's preeminent The Dark Knight Returns, its sequel The Dark Knight Strikes Again and the upcoming Holy Terror, Batman![3] The Dark Knight Returns (commonly abbreviated to DKR) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman and was written and drawn by Frank Miller. ... The Dark Knight Strikes Again (also refered to as DK2) is a Batman graphic novel by Frank Miller with Lynn Varley. ... Holy Terror, Batman! is a 200-page graphic novel by Frank Miller, set for a 2006 release. ...

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
All Star Batman and Robin
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Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

References

  1. ^ The Walker Channel
  2. ^ Johns on "All Star Batgirl"
  3. ^ Comics in Context #119: All-Star Bats on IGN
Batman
Creators: Bob Kane • Bill Finger • (contributors)
Allies: Robin (Tim Drake) • Nightwing (Dick Grayson) • Batgirl • Batwoman • Barbara Gordon • Alfred Pennyworth • Commissioner Gordon  • Jason Todd • Lucius Fox
Enemies: Bane • Catwoman • Clayface • Harley Quinn • Joker • Killer Croc • Mr. Freeze • Penguin • Poison Ivy • Ra's al Ghul • Riddler • Scarecrow • Two-Face
Miscellanea: Arkham Asylum • Batarang • Batcave • Batmobile • Batsuit • Gotham City • Wayne Enterprises • Wayne Manor
Comics: All Star Batman and Robin • Batman • The Brave and the Bold • Detective Comics • Legends of the Dark Knight • Shadow of the Bat • Superman/Batman • World's Finest Comics
[edit]

Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still sometimes as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Kane standing beside Michael Keaton as his creation, the Batman. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Although Bob Kane achieved renown for creating the fictional superhero Batman, he and others have acknowledged the contributions of Bill Finger for fleshing the character out, writing many of his early stories, and creating the characters origin. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Nightwing is a name used by seven fictional superheroes in the DC Comics Universe. ... Richard John Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Cover to Batman: Gotham Knights #43 (2003), featuring Barbara as Batgirl. ... Batwoman (real name Kathy Kane) is the name of a fictional character, the female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Barbara Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... James Worthington Jim Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Bane is the DC Comics supervillain best known for breaking Batmans back. ... Catwoman is a DC Comics character, associated with the Batman franchise and created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ... Clayface is the identity used by a number of shapeshifting supervillains in the DC Comics Universe who have battled Batman. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character, a supervillainess in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as the DC Comics Batman series and its spin-offs, and subsequently in various Batman-related comic books. ... The Joker is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain widely considered to be Batmans archenemy. ... Killer Croc, is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Mister Freeze (Dr. Victor Fries) is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Binomial name Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntze Poison-ivy (Toxicodendron radicans or Rhus toxicodendron), in the family Anacardiaceae, is a woody vine that is well-known for its ability to produce urushiol, a skin irritant which for most people will cause an agonizing, itching rash. ... Ras al Ghul (sometimes written Rās al Ghūl) (Arabic: رأس الغول) (Ras can be pronounced as both RA-AHS and RAY-SH) is a DC Comics supervillain, and an enemy of Batman. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... The Scarecrow (Dr. Jonathan Crane) is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. ... Two-Face is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... Batarang is a portmanteau of bat and boomerang. ... The Batcave is the secret headquarters of fictional DC Comics superhero Batman, (the dual identity of millionaire playboy Bruce Wayne), consisting of a series of subterranean caves beneath his residence, Wayne Manor. ... The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... The batsuit as depicted by Jim Lee in Batman #608 The Batsuit or Bat-Suit is the costume of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Gotham Citys skyline, as it appears in the 1989 Batman movie. ... Wayne Enterprises (formerly WayneCorp) is the fictitious company owned by billionaire Bruce Wayne in the popular Batman series. ... In DC Comics, Wayne Manor is the personal residence of Bruce Wayne, who is also Batman. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... Categories: Comics stubs | Batman | DC Comics titles ... Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, commonly referred to as simply Legends of the Dark Knight is a DC comic book featuring Batman. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ...

External links

  • DC Comics' mini site for All Star Batman & Robin
  • Newsarama's Jim Lee preview interview on All Star Batman and Robin
  • Newsarama's Frank Miller preview interview on All Star Batman and Robin
  • Newsarama article: Miller & Lee Team on All Star Batman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Robin (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4430 words)
Robin joined the good side for a time, but in the crisis issue it was revealed that Robin had in fact been working with Darkk the whole time; in the end he was transformed into a Hawkman, before being reborn through Yggdrasil as The Atom.
In the 853rd century the current Batman is aided by the robot called 'Robin The Toy Wonder.' This Batman's parents were guards on the prison planet of Pluto and died in a prison riot that turned into a mass slaughter of the guards.
Robin is programmed with the personality of this Batman as a boy and acts as a foil/source of perspective so that he will not become consumed by darkness in his quest for justice.
All Star Batman and Robin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1589 words)
These series are helmed by star writers and artists in the American comic book industry and they attempt to retell some of the history of prominent DC Universe characters, but outside of the strict DC Universe continuity.
All Star Batman and Robin appears to be in a different continuity to Grant Morrison's All Star Superman, or if they are both in the same continuity, they take place in different time periods of that continuity.
For instance, in All Star Superman #2, Superman mentions Robin when he is talking to Lois in the Fortress of Solitude, whereas Robin does not yet exist in All Star Batman and Robin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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