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Encyclopedia > Aliyah
First Aliyah: Biluim wearing traditional Arab headdress, the keffiyeh.
First Aliyah: Biluim wearing traditional Arab headdress, the keffiyeh.

Aliyah (Hebrew: עלייה Translit.: Aliya Translated: ascent) refers to Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel (and since its establishment in 1948, the State of Israel). The opposite action, Jewish emigration from Israel, is referred to as Yerida ("descent"). Aliyah (‎, ’ăliyyāh; ascent or going up) may refer to: Aliyah La-Aretz, Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel Aliyah La-Torah, or Aufruf/Ufruf, being called up to read a portion of the Torah during shabbat Aliyah Lregel (עלייה לרגל), travelling to the Temple in Jerusalem for the three... Image File history File links First_aliyah_BILU_in_kuffiyeh. ... Image File history File links First_aliyah_BILU_in_kuffiyeh. ... Main article: State of Israel. ... Bilu (Hebrew acronym בילו; based on a verse from the Book of Isaiah (2:5) בית יעקב לכו ונלכה Beit Yaakov Lekhu Ve-nelkha (House of Jacob, let us go [up]) was a group of Jewish idealists aspiring to settle in the Land of Israel with the political purpose to establish Jewish National Homeland... An Iraqi man wearing a predominantly red keffiyeh in a Charraweyya (‍چراوية) style. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew uses the Hebrew alphabet with optional vowel points. ... Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Satellite image of the Land of Israel in January 2003. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... A memorial statue in Hanko, Finland, commemorating the thousands of emigrants who left the country to start a new life in the United States Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country or region to settle in another. ... Yerida (Hebrew: Translit. ...

Contents

Religious, ideological and cultural concept

Aliyah is widely regarded as an important Jewish cultural concept and a fundamental concept of Zionism that is enshrined in Israel's Law of Return, which permits any Jew the legal right to assisted immigration and settlement in Israel, as well as automatic Israeli citizenship. A Jew who makes aliyah is called an oleh (m. singular) or olah (f. singular), the plural for both is olim. Many Religious Jews espouse aliyah as a return to the Promised land, and regard it as the fulfillment of God's biblical promise to the descendants of the Hebrew patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Aliyah is included as a commandment by some opinions on the enumeration of the 613 commandments. This article is about Zionism as a movement, not the History of Israel. ... The Law of Return (Hebrew: חוק השבות, hok ha-shvut) is Israeli legislation that allows Jews and those with Jewish parents or grandparents, and spouses of the aforementioned, to settle in Israel and gain citizenship. ... This article is about the moral/legal concept. ... Map of the Land of Israel as defined in the Bible The Promised Land (Hebrew: הארץ המובטחת, translit. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Main article: Mitzvah i know year 11 stella girls are looking at this right. ...


In Zionist discourse, the term aliyah (plural aliyot) includes both voluntary immigration for ideological, emotional, or practical reasons and, on the other hand, mass flight of persecuted populations of Jews. The vast majority of Israeli Jews today trace their family's recent roots to outside of the country. While many have actively chosen to settle in Israel rather than some other country, many had little or no choice about leaving their previous home countries. While Israel is commonly recognized as "a country of immigrants", it is also, in large measure, a country of refugees. This article is about Zionism as a movement, not the History of Israel. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... What is Refugees? Refugees is a simple internet community that was created as a homeland and haven for the members of the message board MegaMassMedia. ...


According to the most common traditional Jewish ordering of books of the Bible, the very last word of the Bible (i.e. the last word in the original Hebrew of verse 2 Chronicles 36:23) is veya`al, a "jussive" verb form derived from the same root as aliyah, meaning "let him go up" (to Israel). For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Historical background

Aliyah 1948-2000: by numbers and by source.

Mass return to the Land of Israel is a recurring theme in Jewish prayers recited every day, three times a day, and holiday services on Passover and Yom Kippur traditionally conclude with the words "Next year in Jerusalem." For generations, however, aliyah was associated with the coming of the Jewish Messiah. Jews prayed for their Messiah to come, who was to redeem the Land of Israel from gentile rule and return world Jewry to the land under a Halachic theocracy. Image File history File links Aliyah_1948_2000. ... Image File history File links Olim_by_source. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... Yom Kippur (Hebrew:יוֹם כִּפּוּר , IPA: ), also known in English as the Day of Atonement, is the most solemn of the Jewish holidays. ... The concept of the messiah in Judaism is briefly discussed in the Jewish eschatology entry. ... Halakha (הלכה in Hebrew or Halakhah, Halacha, Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish law, custom and tradition regulating all aspects of behavior. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For other uses, see Theocracy (disambiguation). ...


Pre-Zionist aliyah (1200-1882)

The number of Jews returning to the Land of Israel from the Jewish Diaspora rose significantly between the 13th and 19th centuries, mainly due to a general decline in the status of Jews across Europe and an increase in religious persecution. The expulsion of Jews from England (1290), France (1391), Austria (1421) and Spain (the Alhambra decree of 1492) were seen by many as a sign of approaching redemption and contributed greatly to the messianic spirit of the time. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Religious persecution is systematic mistreatment of an individual or group due to their religious affiliation. ... In 1290, King Edward I issued an edict ordering all Jews expelled from England. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


Aliyah was also spurred during this period by the resurgence of messianic fervor among the Jews of France, Italy, the Germanic states, Poland, Russia and North Africa. The belief in the imminent coming of the Jewish Messiah, the ingathering of the exiles and the re-establishment of the kingdom of Israel encouraged many who had few other options to make the perilous journey to the Land of Israel (Eretz Yisrael). German Jews have lived in Germany for over 1700 years, through both periods of tolerance and spasms of antisemitic violence, culminating in the Holocaust and the near-destruction of the Jewish community in Germany and much of Europe. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... In Judaism and Jewish eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during... 10th century BCE: The Land of Israel, including the United Kingdom of Israel Commonwealth of Israel redirects here. ... Satellite image of the Land of Israel in January 2003. ...


Pre-Zionist resettlement in Palestine met with various degrees of success. For example, little is known of the fate of the 1210 "aliyah of the three hundred rabbis" and their descendants. It is thought that few survived the bloody upheavals caused by the Crusader invasion in 1229 and their subsequent expulsion by the Muslims in 1291. After the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453 and the expulsion of Jews from Spain (1492) and Portugal (1498), many Jews made their way to the Holy Land. Then the immigration in the 18th and early 19th centuries of thousands of followers of various Kabbalist and Hassidic rabbis, as well as the disciples of the Vilna Gaon and the disciples of the Chattam Sofer, added considerably to the Jewish populations in Jerusalem, Tiberias, Hebron, and Safed. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... Elijah Ben Solomon, the Vilna Gaon The Vilna Gaon (April 23, 1720 – October 9, 1797) was a prominent Jewish rabbi, Talmud scholar, and Kabbalist. ... Rabbi Moses ben Samuel Sofer or Schreiber, also known by his main work Hatam Sofer or the Chasam Soifer (שות חתם סופר - Responsa the Seal of the Scribe), was one of the leading rabbis of European Jewry in the first half of the nineteenth century. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Hebrew טבריה (Standard) Teverya Arabic طبرية Government City District North Population 39 900 (a) Jurisdiction 10 000 dunams (10 km²) Tiberias (British English: ; American English: ; Hebrew: , Tverya; Arabic: , abariyyah) is a town on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, Lower Galilee, Israel. ... Arabic الخليل Government City (from 1997) Also Spelled Al-Khalil (officially) Al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 167,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi , Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city at the... Safed (Hebrew: צְפַת, Tiberian: , Israeli: Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas; Arabic: صفد ; KJV English: Zephath) is a city in the North District in Israel. ...


The messianic dreams of the Gaon of Vilna inspired one of the largest pre-Zionist waves of immigration to Eretz Yisrael. In 1808, hundreds of the Gaon's disciples, known as Perushim, settled in Tiberias and Safed, and later formed the core of the Old Yishuv in Jerusalem. [1][2] This was part of a larger movement of thousands of Jews from countries as widely spaced as Persia and Morocco, Yemen and Russia, who moved to Israel beginning in the first decade of the nineteenth century - and in even larger numbers after the conquest of the region by Muhammad Ali of Egypt in 1832 - all drawn by the expectation of the arrivval of the Messiah in the Jewish year 5600, English year 1840, a movement documented in Arie Morgenstern's Hastening Redemption. Elijah Ben Solomon, the Vilna Gaon The Vilna Gaon (April 23, 1720 – October 9, 1797) was a prominent Jewish rabbi, Talmud scholar, and Kabbalist. ... The Perushim (Hebrew: ) were disciples of Rabbi Elijah ben Solomon Zalman (the Vilna Gaon), who left Lithuania to settle in the Land of Israel, then a province of the Ottoman Empire at the beginning of the nineteenth century. ... Yishuv is a Hebrew word meaning settlement. ... This article is about the leader of Egypt. ...


There were also those who like the British mystic Laurence Oliphant tried to lease Northern Palestine to settle the Jews there (1879). Laurence Oliphant (1829 - December 23, 1888), British author, son of Anthony Oliphant (1793-1859), was born at Cape Town. ...


Zionist Aliyah (From 1882)

In Zionist history, the different waves of aliyah, beginning with the arrival of the Biluim from Russia in 1882, are often categorized by date and the country of origin of the immigrants. Bilu (Hebrew acronym בילו; based on a verse from the Book of Isaiah (2:5) בית יעקב לכו ונלכה Beit Yaakov Lekhu Ve-nelkha (House of Jacob, let us go [up]) was a group of Jewish idealists aspiring to settle in the Land of Israel with the political purpose to establish Jewish National Homeland...


First Aliyah (1882-1903)

Main article: First Aliyah

Between 1882 and 1903, approximately 35,000 Jews immigrated to Palestine, then a province of the Ottoman Empire. The majority, belonging to the Hibbat Zion and Bilu movements, came from the Russian Empire with a smaller number arriving from Yemen. Many established agricultural communities. Among the towns that these individuals established are Petah Tikva (already in 1878), Rishon LeZion, Rosh Pina, and Zikhron Ya'aqov. In 1882, the Yemenite Jews established a new suburb of Jerusalem called the Yemenite Village in Silwan located south-east of the walls of the Old City on the slopes of the Mount of Olives. Members of the Bilu movement in Palestine The First Aliyah (also The Farmers Aliyah) was the first modern widespread wave of Zionist aliyah. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Hovevei Zion (transliterated Hebrew, alternatively Hibbat Zion; English translation: Lovers of Zion) organizations are considered the forerunner and foundation of the modern Zionist movement. ... Bilu (Hebrew acronym בילו; based on a verse from the Book of Isaiah (2:5) בית יעקב לכו ונלכה Beit Yaakov Lekhu Ve-nelkha (House of Jacob, let us go [up]) was a group of Jewish idealists aspiring to settle in the Land of Israel with the political purpose to establish Jewish National Homeland... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... The Coat of Arms of Petah-Tikva Petah-Tikva (Hebrew פֶּתַח-תִּקְוָה opening of hope, Standard Hebrew Pétaḥ-Tiqva, also transliterated as Petach Tikva, Petah Tikvah, Petach Tikvah, Petaḥ Tiqwa or Petach Tiqwa) and nicknamed as Mother of Cities, is a city in the west of the Center District of Israel... Rishon Le Zion in 2002 Rishon LeZion, or Rishon LeZiyyon (ראשון לציון) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, in the Center District of Israel, just south of Tel Aviv, and part of the Tel Aviv metropolitan area (Gush Dan). ... Rosh Pina is a town in northern Israel first settled by Romanian Jews in 1882. ... Zikhron Yaaqov (זִכְרוֹן יַעֲקֹב ; unofficially also spelled Zichron Yaakov) (meaning Jacobs memorial) is a city in Israel, near Haifa, part of the Haifa District. ... Yemenite Jews (תֵּימָנִי, Standard Hebrew Temani, Tiberian Hebrew Têmānî; plural תֵּימָנִים, Standard Hebrew Temanim, Tiberian Hebrew Têmānîm) are those Jews who live, or whose recent ancestors lived, in Yemen (תֵּימָן far south, Standard Hebrew Teman, Tiberian Hebrew Têmān), a nation on the southern tip of the Arabian peninsula. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with City of David. ... The Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives, overlooking the Old City The Mount of Olives (also Mount Olivet, Hebrew: ‎, Har HaZeitim; Arabic: ‎, Jebel ez-Zeitun, Jebel et-Tur, Mount of the Summit) is a mountain ridge to the east of Jerusalem. ...


Second Aliyah (1904-1914)

Main article: Second Aliyah

Between 1904 and 1914, 40,000 Jews immigrated mainly from Russia to Palestine following pogroms and outbreaks of anti-semitism in that country. This group, many of whom were infused with socialist ideals, established the first kibbutz, Degania, in 1909 and formed self defense organizations, such as Hashomer, to counter increasing Arab hostility and to help Jews to protect their communities from Arab bandits. The suburb of Jaffa, Ahuzat Bayit, established at this time, grew into the city of Tel Aviv. During this period, some of the underpinnings of an independent nation-state arose: The national language Hebrew was revived; newspapers and literature written in Hebrew published; political parties and workers organizations were established. The First World War effectively ended the period of the Second Aliyah. The Second Aliyah was arguably the most important and influential aliyah. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Socialism refers to the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... Kibbutz Merom Golan as seen from Bental mountain A Kibbutz (Hebrew: Translit. ... Degania, the mother of kvutzot (small kibbutzim) in the 1930s. ... Hashomer - (Hebrew) (The Guard) - Jewish defense organization in Palestine organized 1909, ceased to operate after founding of the Haganah in 1920. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Jaffa (Hebrew יָפוֹ, Standard Hebrew Yafo, Tiberian Hebrew Yāp̄ô; Arabic يَافَا Yāfā; also Japho, Joppa), is an ancient city located in Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Third Aliyah (1919-1923)

Aliyah to Israel and settlement
Pre-Zionist Aliyah
  • The Return to Zion
  • The Old Yishuv

Prior to the founding of Israel

After the founding of Israel

Related topics

Jewish historyJewish diasporaHistory of the Jews in the Land of IsraelYishuv • History of Zionism (Timeline) • Revival of Hebrew languageReligious ZionismHaredim and Zionism • Anti-Zionism Ever since the Jews were exiled from the Land of Israel, during all generations, many Jews aspired to return to their ancestral homeland. ... Members of the Bilu movement in Palestine The First Aliyah (also The Farmers Aliyah) was the first modern widespread wave of Zionist aliyah. ... The Second Aliyah was arguably the most important and influential aliyah. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Fourth Aliyah refers to the fourth wave of the Jewish immigration to Israel from Europe and Asia whom came based on Zionist motives between the years 1924 and 1928. ... The Fifth Aliyah reffers to the fourth wave of the Jewish immigration to Israel from Europe and Asia between the years 1929 and 1939. ... For the effort initiated by Polish Zionists from Lublin to bring European Jews to Palestine (1944-48), see Berihah. ... Berihah (literally escape in Hebrew) was the organized effort to help Jews escape post-Holocaust Europe for the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Most of Yemenite Jews had never seen an aircraft before, but they believed in the Biblical prophecy: according to the Book of Isaiah (40:31), God promised to return the Children of Israel to Zion with wings. Operation Magic Carpet was an operation between June 1949 and September 1950 that... From 1950 to 1952, Operation Ezra and Nehemiah brought almost all the Iraqi Jews to Israel, first by way of Cyprus, then directly to Israel. ... For other uses, see Exodus (disambiguation). ... The Polish 1968 political crisis (also known in Poland as March 1968 or March events, Polish: or wydarzenia marcowe) describes major student and intellectual protests against the communist government of the Peoples Republic of Poland, their repression by state forces and the concurrent Soviet anti-Zionist reaction. ... In the 1970s a big immigration wave of Soviet Union Jews came to Israel. ... The aliyah of the Jewish Ethiopians began during the mid-1970s, during which most of the majority of the Jewish Ethiopians immigrated to Israel. ... The big immigration wave of Jews from the Commonwealth of Independent States to Israel during the 1990s started actually at the late 1980s with the opening of the USSR borders in the era of Mikhail Gorbachev liberal government. ... In the 1999–2002 Argentine political and economic crisis that caused a run on the banks, wiped out billions of dollars in deposits and decimated the countrys middle class, most of Argentinas estimated 200,000 Jews were directly affected. ... Jewish history is the history of the Jewish people, faith, and culture. ... The Jewish diaspora (Hebrew: Tefutzah, scattered, or Galut גלות, exile, Yiddish: tfutses), the Jewish presence outside of the Land of Israel is a result of the expulsion of the Jewish people out of their land, during the destruction of the First Temple, Second Temple and after the Bar Kokhba revolt. ... The History of the Jews in the Land of Israel begins with the ancient Israelites (also known as Hebrews), who settled in the land of Israel. ... Yishuv is a Hebrew word meaning settlement. ... Timeline of Zionism in the modern era: 1861 - The Zion Society is formed in Frankfurt, Germany. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Religious Zionism, or the Religious Zionist Movement, a branch of which is also called Mizrachi, is an ideology that claims to combine Zionism and Judaism, to base Zionism on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ... The relationship between Haredim and Zionism has always been a difficult one. ... Anti-Zionism is opposition to Zionism, an international political movement that supports a homeland for the Jewish people in Palestine[1][2] Anti-Zionism takes many forms, ranging from political or religious opposition to the idea of a Jewish state, to rejecting Israels right to exist and the legitimacy...


v  d  e
Main article: Third Aliyah

Between 1919 and 1923, 40,000 Jews, mainly from the Russian Empire arrived in the wake of World War I, the British conquest of Palestine; the establishment of the Mandate, and the Balfour Declaration. Many of these were pioneers, known as halutzim, trained in agriculture and capable of establishing self sustaining economies. In spite of immigration quotas established by the British administration, the population of Jews reached 90,000 by the end of this period. The Jezreel Valley and the Hefer Plain marshes were drained and converted to agricultural use. Additional national institutions arose: The Histadrut (General Labor Federation); an elected assembly; national council; and the Haganah. Few of these individuals left the country. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants United Kingdom Australia New Zealand Ottoman Empire Commanders Sir John Maxwell Archibald Murray Henry George Chauvel Philip Chetwode Charles Dobell Edmund Allenby Djemal Pasha Kress von Kressenstein Jadir Bey Tala Bey Erich von Falkenhayn Otto Liman von Sanders The Sinai and Palestine Campaign during the Middle Eastern Theatre of... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Arthur James Balfour. ... Jezreel Valley and Mount Tabor, Israel Jezreel Valley The Jezreel Valley ; ‎, Emek Yizrael, also known as the Plain of Esdraelon (Esdraelon is the Koine Greek rendering of Jezreel[1]), and as the Zirin Valley (Arabic: , Sahel Zirin), and as the Meadow of Amrs son (مرج بن عامر, Marj Ibn Amer), is... The Histadrut (Federation [of labor]) or HaHistadrut HaKlalit shel HaOvdim BEretz Yisrael (ההסתדרות הכללית של העובדים בארץ ישראל) (Hebrew: General Federation of Laborers in the Land of Israel) is the Israeli trade union congress. ... The Haganah (Hebrew: Defense, ×”×’× ×”) was a Zionist para-military organization in Palestine during the British mandate of Palestine from 1920 to 1948. ...


Fourth Aliyah (1924-1929)

Main article: Fourth Aliyah

Between 1924 and 1929, 82,000 Jews arrived, many as a result of anti-semitism in Poland and Hungary. The immigration quotas of the United States kept Jews out. This group contained many middle class families that moved to the growing towns, establishing small businesses and light industry. FBB The Fourth Aliyah refers to the fourth wave of the Jewish immigration to Israel from Europe and Asia whom came based on Zionist motives between the years 1924 and 1928. ... In the United States, the Emergency Quota Act (ch. ...


Of these approximately 23,000 left the country.


Fifth Aliyah (1929-1939)

Main article: Fifth Aliyah

Between 1929 and 1939, with the rise of Nazism in Germany, a new wave of 250,000 immigrants arrived, the majority of these, 174,000, arrived between 1933-1936, after which increasing restrictions on immigration by the British made immigration clandestine and illegal, called Aliyah Bet. The Fifth Aliyah was again driven mostly from Eastern Europe as well as professionals, doctors, lawyers and professors, from Germany. Refugee artists introduced Bauhaus (Tel Aviv has the highest concentration of Bauhaus architecture in the world) and founded the Palestine Philharmonic Orchestra. With the completion of the port at Haifa and its oil refineries, significant industry was added to the predominantly agricultural economy. The Jewish population reached 450,000 by 1940. The Fifth Aliyah reffers to the fourth wave of the Jewish immigration to Israel from Europe and Asia between the years 1929 and 1939. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... For information about British rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ... Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Government City District Haifa Population 266,300 (city) 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... View of the Shell/Valero Martinez oil refinery An oil refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into useful petroleum products. ...


At the same time, tensions between Arabs and Jews grew during this period, leading to a series of Arab riots against the Jews in 1929 that left many dead and resulted in the depopulation of the Jewish community in Hebron. This was followed by more violence during the "Great Uprising" of 1936-1939. In response to the ever increasing tension between the Arabic and Jewish communities married with the various commitments the British faced at the dawn of World War II , the British issued the White Paper of 1939, which severely restricted Jewish immigration to 75,000 people for five years . This served to create a relatively peaceful 8 years in Palestine while tragically The Holocaust unfolded in Europe. The Hebron massacre of 1929 was the murder by Arab rioters of 67 Jews in Hebron, then part of the Palestine under the British mandate. ... Arabic الخليل Government City (from 1997) Also Spelled Al-Khalil (officially) Al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 167,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi , Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city at the... The Great Uprising, Great Revolt, or Great Arab Revolt was an uprising by Palestinian Arabs in the British Mandate of Palestine which lasted from 1936 to 1939. ... London Conference, St. ...


Shortly after their rise to power, the Nazis negotiated The Transfer Agreement with Zionists under which 50,000 Jews and $100 million of their assets would be moved to Palestine.[4]


Aliyah Bet: Illegal immigration (1933-1948)

July 15, 1945. Buchenwald survivors arrive in Haifa to be arrested by the British
Main article: Aliya Bet

The British government limited Jewish immigration to Palestine with quotas, and following the rise of Nazism to power in Germany, illegal immigration to Palestine commenced. The illegal immigration was known as Aliyah Bet ("secondary immigration"), or Ha'apalah, and was organized by the Mossad Le'aliyah Bet, as well as by the Irgun. Immigration was done mainly by sea, and to a lesser extent overland through Iraq and Syria. Beginning in 1939 Jewish immigration was further restricted, limiting it to 75,000 individuals for a period of five years after which immigration was to end completely. The British made it illegal to sell land to Jews in 95% of the Mandate.[citation needed] During World War II and the years that followed until independence, Aliyah Bet became the main form of Jewish immigration to Palestine. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (476x715, 117 KB)July 15, 1945. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (476x715, 117 KB)July 15, 1945. ... Buchenwald is the German for beech forest. A koolio forest in the hill range Elm (Höhenzug Elm), in the Helmstedt and Wolfenbüttel districts, Lower Saxony A German name for a Hungarian region Bakony Forest (Hungarian: , German: ) A Nazi concentration camp in Germany (German: ); See Buchenwald concentration camp Buchenwald... Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Government City District Haifa Population 266,300 (city) 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... For the effort initiated by Polish Zionists from Lublin to bring European Jews to Palestine (1944-48), see Berihah. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Irgun emblem. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Following the war, Berihah ("flight"), an organization of former partisans and ghetto fighters was primarily responsible for smuggling Jews from Poland and Eastern Europe to the Italian ports from which they traveled to Palestine. Berihah (literally escape in Hebrew) was the organized effort to help Jews escape post-Holocaust Europe for the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The Jewish resistance movement were several attempts of resistence of the Jewish people against Nazi Germany leading up to and through World War II. Due to the careful organization and overwhelming military might of the Nazi German State and its supporters, many Jews were unable to resist the killings. ... Belligerents Germany (Waffen-SS, SD, OrPo, Gestapo, Wehrmacht) Collaborators (Arajs Kommando, Blue Police, Jewish Police, Lithuanian Police) Jewish resistance (ŻOB, ŻZW) Polish resistance (AK, GL) Commanders Franz Bürkl Ludwig Hahn Odilo Globocnik Friedrich Krüger Ferdinand von Sammern-Frankenegg Jürgen Stroop Mordechaj Anielewicz† Dawid Apfelbaum† Icchak Cukierman Marek...


Despite British efforts to curb the illegal immigration, during the 14 years of its operation, 110,000 Jews immigrated to Palestine.


In 1945 reports of the Holocaust with its 6 million Jewish dead caused many Jews in Palestine to turn openly against the British Mandate, and illegal immigration escalated rapidly as many Holocaust survivors joined the Aliyah. For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...


Immigration from 1948-1950

After Aliyah Bet, the process of numbering or naming individual aliyot ceased, but immigration did not. A major wave of immigration of over half a million Jews went to Israel between 1948 and 1950, many fleeing renewed persecution in Eastern Europe, and increasingly hostile Arab countries.


This period of immigration is often termed kibbutz galuyot (literally, ingathering of diasporas), due to the large number of Jewish diaspora communities that made aliyah. However, kibbutz galuyot can also refer to aliyah in general. For other uses, see Diaspora (disambiguation). ...


Middle Eastern Jews

Yemenite Jews on their way to Israel
Yemenite Jews on their way to Israel

In the course of Operation Magic Carpet (1949-1950), the entire community of Yemenite Jews (about 49,000) emigrated to Israel. Most of them had never seen an airplane before, but they believed in the Biblical prophecy that according to the Book of Isaiah (40:31), God promised to return the children of Israel to Zion on "wings". For other uses, see Exodus (disambiguation). ... In the course of the operation Magic Carpet (1949-1950), the entire community of Yemenite Jews (called Teimanim, about 49,000) immigrated to Israel. ... In the course of the operation Magic Carpet (1949-1950), the entire community of Yemenite Jews (called Teimanim, about 49,000) immigrated to Israel. ... Most of Yemenite Jews had never seen an aircraft before, but they believed in the Biblical prophecy: according to the Book of Isaiah (40:31), God promised to return the Children of Israel to Zion with wings. Operation Magic Carpet was an operation between June 1949 and September 1950 that... Yemenite Jews (Hebrew: תֵּימָנִים, Standard Temanim Tiberian ; singular תֵּימָנִי, Standard Temani Tiberian ) are those Jews who live, or whose recent ancestors lived, in Yemen (תֵּימָן, Standard Teman Tiberian ; far south), on the southern tip of the Arabian peninsula. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The Children of Israel, or Bnei Yisrael (בני ישראל) in Hebrew (also Bnai Yisrael, Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ...

1952. Ma'abarah, a tent city for Jewish refugees in Israel
1952. Ma'abarah, a tent city for Jewish refugees in Israel

In three and a half years, the Jewish population of Israel had doubled, inflated by nearly 700,000 immigrants, which was one of the causes of the austerity. Huge numbers of Jewish refugees were temporarily settled in "cities of tents" called Ma'abarot. Their population was gradually absorbed into Israeli society. The Ma'abarot existed until 1958. Maabarah children This work is copyrighted. ... Maabarah children This work is copyrighted. ... Main article: History of Israel Austerity in Israel: From 1949 to 1959, the state of Israel was, to a varying extent, under a regime of austerity (צנע tsena), during which rationing and similar measures were enforced. ... The Maabarot (Hebrew: מעברות) were transit camps that were in Israel in the 1950s. ...


Many Israeli immigrants were Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews who left Arab countries to move to Israel. In many of these cases they had been persecuted and sometimes forced to leave their homes. 114,000 Jews came from Iraq in 1951 in Operation Ezra and Nehemiah. Sephardim (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Sfaradim, Tiberian Hebrew ) are a subgroup of Jews, generally defined in contrast to Ashkenazim and/or . ... Languages Hebrew, Dzhidi, Judæo-Arabic, Gruzinic, Bukhori, Judeo-Berber, Juhuri and Judæo-Aramaic Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions and Arabs. ... From 1950 to 1952, Operation Ezra and Nehemiah brought almost all the Iraqi Jews to Israel, first by way of Cyprus, then directly to Israel. ...


Over 30,000 Iranian Jews immigrated to Israel following the Islamic Revolution. Most Iranian Jews, however, settled in the United States (especially in Los Angeles). Language(s) Persian languages, Hebrew, Judeo-Aramaic language Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Bukharan Jews, Kurdish Jews ,Mountain Jews ,Mizrahi Jews,Persians,Jews A modern-day synagogue in Iran. ... This article is about the 1979 revolution in Iran. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Ethiopian Aliyah

Main article: Aliyah from Ethiopia

The massive airlift known as Operation Moses began to bring Ethiopian Jews to Israel on November 18, 1985 and ended on January 5. During those six weeks, some 6,500-8,000 Ethiopian Jews were flown from Sudan to Israel. An estimated 2,000-4,000 Jews died en route to Sudan or in Sudanese refugee camps. The aliyah of the Jewish Ethiopians began during the mid-1970s, during which most of the majority of the Jewish Ethiopians immigrated to Israel. ... Operation Moses, named after the biblical figure Moses, was the covert removal of Ethiopian Jews (known as Beta Israel) from Sudan during a famine in 1984. ... The Beta Israel (or House of Israel), known by outsiders by the pejorative term Falasha or Falash Mura (exiles or strangers) are Jews of Ethiopian origin. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1991, Operation Solomon was launched to rescue the Beta Israel Jews of Ethiopia. In one day, May 24, 34 aircraft landed at Addis Ababa and brought 14,325 Jews from Ethiopia to Israel. Operation Solomon was a 1991 covert Israeli military operation to take Ethiopian Jews to Israel. ... The Beta Israel (Geez ቤተ፡ እስራኤል Bēta Isrāēl, modern Bēte Isrāēl; ‎), also known by the term Falasha (Amharic for Exiles or Strangers, as they were called by non-Jewish Ethiopians — a term that is considered pejorative) are Jews of Ethiopian origin. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the long-distance runner, see Addis Abebe. ...


Since that time, Ethiopian Jews have continued to immigrate to Israel bringing the number of Ethiopian-Israelis today to over 100,000.


Aliyah from the Soviet Union and post-Soviet states

Main articles: Aliyah from the Soviet Union in the 1970s and Aliyah from the Soviet Union in the 1990s
January 10, 1973. Soviet authorities break up a demonstration of Jewish refuseniks in front of the Ministry of Internal Affairs for the right to immigrate to Israel
January 10, 1973. Soviet authorities break up a demonstration of Jewish refuseniks in front of the Ministry of Internal Affairs for the right to immigrate to Israel
Year Exit visas
to Israel
Olim from
the USSR[3]
1968 231 231
1969 3,033 3,033
1970 999 999
1971 12,897 12,893
1972 31,903 31,652
1973 34,733 33,277
1974 20,767 16,888
1975 13,363 8,435
1976 14,254 7,250
1977 16,833 8,350
1978 28,956 12,090
1979 51,331 17,278
1980 21,648 7,570
1981 9,448 1,762
1982 2,692 731
1983 1,314 861
1984 896 340
1985 1,140 348
1986 904 201

A mass emigration was politically undesirable for the Soviet regime. The only acceptable ground was family reunification, and a formal petition ("вызов", vyzov) from a relative from abroad was required for the processing to begin. Often, the result was a formal refusal. The risks to apply for an exit visa compounded because the entire family had to quit their jobs, which in turn would make them vulnerable to charges of social parasitism, a criminal offense. Because of these hardships, Israel set up the group Lishkat Hakesher in the early 1950s to maintain contact and promote aliyah with Jews behind the Iron Curtain. In the 1970s a big immigration wave of Soviet Union Jews came to Israel. ... The big immigration wave of Jews from the Commonwealth of Independent States to Israel during the 1990s started actually at the late 1980s with the opening of the USSR borders in the era of Mikhail Gorbachev liberal government. ... Image File history File links 19730110_Soviet_refuseniks_demonstrate_at_MVD.jpg‎ January 10, 1973. ... Image File history File links 19730110_Soviet_refuseniks_demonstrate_at_MVD.jpg‎ January 10, 1973. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Refusenik (Hebrew: , transliterated: mesorav); or Otkaznik (Russian: , from отказ, i. ... Refusenik (Hebrew: , transliterated: mesorav); or Otkaznik (Russian: , from отказ, i. ... The Nazi propaganda poster titled New People reads: This person suffering from hereditary defects costs the people 60,000 Reichmarks during his lifetime. ... Lishkat Hakesher or The Israeli Liaison Office, codenamed Nativ (נתיב-path), is an Israeli liasion organization that maintained contact with Jews living in the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War. ... Warsaw Pact countries to the east of the Iron Curtain are shaded red; NATO members to the west of it — blue. ...


In the wake of Israel's victory in the Six-Day War in 1967, the USSR broke off the diplomatic relations with the Jewish state. Anti-Zionist propaganda campaign in the state-controlled mass media and the rise of Zionology were accompanied by harsher discrimination of the Soviet Jews. By the end of 1960s, Jewish cultural and religious life in the Soviet Union had become practically impossible, and the majority of Soviet Jews were assimilated and non-religious, but this new wave of state-sponsored anti-Semitism on one hand, and the sense of pride for victorious Jewish nation over Soviet-armed Arab armies on the other, stirred up Zionist feelings. Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Anti-Zionism is opposition to Zionism, an international political movement that supports a homeland for the Jewish people in Palestine[1][2] Anti-Zionism takes many forms, ranging from political or religious opposition to the idea of a Jewish state, to rejecting Israels right to exist and the legitimacy... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... Zionology (Russian language: сионология sionologiya), also called Soviet Anti-Zionism, was a doctrine promulgated in the Soviet Union during the course of the Cold War, and intensified after the 1967 Six Day War. ... Not to be confused with Intermarriage. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ...


After the Dymshits-Kuznetsov hijacking affair and the crackdown that followed, strong international condemnations caused the Soviet authorities to increase the emigration quota. In the years 1960-1970, the USSR let only 4,000 people leave; in the following decade, the number rose to 250,000 [4]. Many of those allowed to leave to Israel chose other destinations, most notably the United States. In 1989 a record 71,000 Soviet Jews were granted exodus from the USSR, of whom only 12,117 emigrated to Israel. Since the dissolution of the USSR, over one million Soviet Jews have emigrated to Israel. See The collapse of the Soviet Union and Jewish emigration to Israel and Jackson-Vanik amendment. // Dymshits-Kuznetsov aircraft hijacking affair (Russian language: Ленинградское самолётное дело or Дело группы Дымшица-Кузнецова) was an attempt to hijack a civilian aircraft on May 15, 1970 by a group of Soviet refuseniks in order to escape to the West. ... Look up quota in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... The vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest Jewish population in the world. ... According to the 1974 Trade act, the Jackson-Vanik amendment, named for its major co-sponsors, Sen. ...


Recent trends

Since the mid 1990s, there has been a steady stream of South African Jews, American Jews, and French Jews who have either made aliyah, or purchased property in Israel for potential future immigration. Specifically, many French Jews have purchased homes in Israel as insurance due to the rising rate of anti-Semitism in France in recent years [5]. American Jews, or Jewish Americans, are Jews who are American citizens or resident aliens. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain 1901-1906 Jewish Encyclopedia The history of the Jews of France dates back over 2,000 years. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain 1901-1906 Jewish Encyclopedia The history of the Jews of France dates back over 2,000 years. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ...


The Bnei Menashe Jews from India, which were only recently discovered and recognised by mainstream Judaism as descendants of the Ten Lost Tribes, slowly started their Aliyah in the early 1990s and continue arriving in slow numbers. Flag of Bnei Menashe The Bnei Menashe (Children of Menasseh, Hebrew בני מנשה) are a group of more than 8,000 people from Indias remote North-Eastern border states of Manipur and Mizoram who claim descent from one of the Lost Tribes of Israel. ... The phrase Ten Lost Tribes of Israel refers to the ancient Tribes of Israel that disappeared from the Biblical account after the Kingdom of Israel was totally destroyed, enslaved and exiled by ancient Assyria. ...


Organizations such as Nefesh B'Nefesh and Shavei Israel help with aliyah by supporting financial aid and guidance on a variety of topics such as finding work, learning Hebrew, and assimilation into Israeli culture. Nefesh BNefesh is an organization that encourages immigration to Israel from North America. ... Shavei Israel , ‘Israel returns’ in Hebrew, is an Israeli-based Jewish organization that was founded by Michael Freund in 2004. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Intermarriage. ... Israeli culture is inseparable from Judaism which preceded it (i. ...


In early 2007 Haaretz reported that aliyah for the year of 2006 was down approximately 9% from 2005. They state that: "Only 19,264 people immigrated to Israel in 2006, down nine percent from 2005. It is the lowest number of immigrants recorded since 1988" [5]. Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ...


On 20th April 2007, the Israeli daily Yedioth Ahronoth (ידיעות אחרונות) reported that 14,400 immigrants are expected in 2007 while 20,000 are expected to leave the country [6]. The reports also state that: "...approximately a quarter of the Israeli population was considering emigration" and that "Almost half of the country's young people were thinking of leaving the country." Yedioth Ahronoth (Hebrew: ידיעות אחרונות, meaning latest news) is a major daily Israeli newspaper, written in Hebrew. ...


In 2007 The Jerusalem Post reported that: "For the first time in over two decades, it was reported last week, Israel will likely experience a net negative migration rate in 2007" [7]. The same article the The Jerusalem Post also wrote: The May 16, 1948 Palestine Post headline announcing the creation of the state of Israel The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli daily English language broadsheet newspaper, originally founded on December 1, 1932, by American journalist-turned-newspaper-editor Gershon Agron as the The Palestine Post. ...

  • "...it is estimated that more Jews will actually leave Israel than move here this year - something that hasn't happened since 1984."
  • "...a total of just 14,400 new immigrants are expected here [in Israel] this year, or 5,000 less than the number anticipated to relocate abroad."
  • "[This] marks the continuation of an alarming trend that began seven years ago, when the number of people making aliya began spiraling downward, falling from 61,542 in 2000 to just 19,267 last year."
  • "...various Israeli public figures have been sounding the alarm in recent years, stressing the need to bolster Israel's Jewish population through immigration and absorption by calling on Diaspora Jewry to come home to Israel ... But with the pool of potential immigrants from Russia and the former Soviet states shrinking rapidly, and large-scale aliya from the West not yet at hand, the prospects of this occurring appear marginal at best."

Argentine Aliyah

Main article: Aliyah from Latin America in the 2000s

In the 1999–2002 Argentine political and economic crisis that caused a run on the banks, wiped out billions of dollars in deposits and decimated the country's middle class, most of Argentina's estimated 200,000 Jews were directly affected. Some chose to start over and move to Israel, where they saw opportunity. In the 1999–2002 Argentine political and economic crisis that caused a run on the banks, wiped out billions of dollars in deposits and decimated the countrys middle class, most of Argentinas estimated 200,000 Jews were directly affected. ... The Argentine economic crisis was part of the situation that affected Argentinas economy during the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ...


More than 10,000 Jews from Argentina immigrated to Israel since 2000, joining the thousands of previous olim already there. The crisis in Argentina also affected its neighbour country Uruguay, from which over 500 Jews made aliyah in the same period. During 2002 and 2003 the Jewish Agency for Israel launched an intensive public campaign to promote aliyah from the region, and offered additional economical aid for immigrants from Argentina. Although the Argentinean economy improved, Jews continue to immigrate to Israel, albeit in smaller numbers than before. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jewish Agency for Israel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


French Aliyah

See also: History of the Jews in France

From 2001 to 2005, 11,148 Jews made Aliyah from France, including a 35-year high in 2005, with 3,300 immigrants.[citation needed] With the start of the Second Intifada in Israel, anti-Semitic incidents increased in France. In 2002, the Commission nationale consultative des droits de l'homme (Human Rights Commission) reported six times more anti-Semitic incidents than in 2001 (193 incidents in 2002). The commission's statistics showed that anti-Semitic acts constituted 62% of all racist acts in the country (compared to 45% in 2001 and 80% in 2000). The report documented 313 violent acts against people or property, including 38 injuries and the murder of someone with Maghrebin origins by Muslims and white power skinheads.[6] Since 2005, the number of acts dropped but is still at a significantly higher level than during the previous decade. The current Jewish community in France numbers around 606,561, according to the World Jewish Congress and 500,000 according to the Appel Unifié Juif de France (France Jewish community main organism), and is found mainly in the metropolitan areas of Paris, Marseille and Strasbourg. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... The Commission nationale consultative des droits de lhomme (National Consultative Commission on Human Rights, CNCDH) is a French governmental organization created in 1947 by an arrêté from the Foreign Affairs Ministry to control the respect of human rights in the country. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... This article is about the region. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


North American Aliyah

There are approximately 110,000 North American immigrants in Israel. There has been a steady flow of olim from North America since Israel’s inception in 1948. Record numbers arrived in the late 1960s after the Six-Day War, and in the 1970s. Many immigrants began arriving in Israel after the Intifada, with a total of 3,052 arriving in 2005 — the highest number since 1983. Like Western European olim, North Americans tend to immigrate to Israel more for religious, ideological and political purposes, and not financial ones[citation needed]. Nefesh B'Nefesh, founded in 2002 by Rabbi Yehoshua Fass and Tony Gelbart, works to encourage Aliyah from North America and the UK by providing English Language assistance for potential olim, streamlining the process already offered by the Jewish Agency and Israeli Government. North American redirects here. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... Intifada (also Intefadah or Intifadah; from shaking off) is an Arabic term for uprising. It came into common usage in English as the popularized name for two recent Palestinian campaigns directed at Israel. ... Nefesh BNefesh is an organization that encourages immigration to Israel from North America. ... The Jewish Agency for Israel also known as The Jewish Agency (or sochnut in Hebrew), was previously called the Jewish Agency for Palestine (during the British Mandate of Palestine) is an Israeli organisation that advocates for Israel and is composed mainly, but not entirely, of Jewish people. ...


Statistics

The number of immigrants to Israel during 1919-2006 period is given in the table below.[8] The table details the number of olim for the specific time periods by country of birth. (For the year 2006, the last country of residence is also given).

Region 2006 LCR 2006 COB 2005 2000-04 1990-99 1980-89 1972-79 1961-71 1952-60 1948-51 1919-1948 TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL 19,269 19,269 21,180 60,647 956,319 153,833 267,580 427,828 297,138 687,624 482,857 3,374,275
Asia 1,777 1,261 2,239 8,048 61,305 14,433 19,456 56,208 37,119 237,704 40,895 478,668
Iran 74 90 146 449 0 8,487 9,550 19,502 15,699 21,910 75,833
Afghanistan 0 0 2 0 0 57 132 516 1,106 2,303 4,116
India 304 308 61 211 1,717 1,539 3,497 13,110 5,380 2,176 27,999
Turkey 67 70 61 131 1,095 2,088 3,118 14,073 6,871 34,547 62,054
Israel 0 192 105 69 954 288 507 1,021 868 411 4,415
Lebanon 0 7 8 4 0 179 564 2,208 846 235 4,051
Syria 0 0 4 16 0 995 842 3,121 1,870 2,678 9,526
China 10 14 4 16 192 78 43 96 217 504 1,164
Iraq 11 11 12 50 0 111 939 3,509 2,989 123,371 130,992
Yemen 9 10 4 3 0 17 51 1,066 1,170 48,315 50,636
Other 14 26 18 29 7,362 594 213 349 103 1,254 9,948
USSR (As) 1,287 533 1,814 7,069 49,524 58,940
Africa 3,801 4,508 4,518 2,912 48,558 28,664 19,273 164,885 143,485 93,282 4,041 514,126
Ethiopia 3,595 3,595 3,573 2,213 39,651 16,965 306 98 59 10 66,470
South Africa 114 139 135 202 2,918 3,575 5,604 3,783 774 666 17,796
Libya 0 3 3 6 0 66 219 2,466 2,079 30,972 35,814
Egypt/ Sudan 0 19 17 15 176 352 535 2,963 17,521 16,024 37,622
Morocco 53 233 284 205 2,623 3,809 7,780 130,507 95,945 28,263 269,649
Algeria 0 275 280 131 1,317 1,830 2,137 12,857 3,433 3,810 26,070
Tunisia 32 236 218 125 1,251 1,942 2,148 11,566 23,569 13,293 54,348
Other 6 8 8 15 888 125 544 645 105 244 2,582
Europe 9,872 10,063 10,736 46,516 812,079 70,898 183,419 162,070 106,305 332,802 377,381 2,112,269
Austria 12 12 24 23 317 356 595 1,021 610 2,632 5,590
Italy 42 37 35 40 595 510 713 940 414 1,305 4,589
Nordic 36 34 35 41 1,071 1,178 903 886 131 85 4,364
Bulgaria 22 19 38 199 3,673 180 118 794 1,680 37,260 43,961
Belgium 91 78 70 102 891 788 847 1,112 394 291 4,573
USSR (Eu) 6,185 7,069 7,763 43,801 772,239 29,754 137,134 29,376 13,743 8,163 1,049,042
Germany 112 87 112 177 2,150 1,759 2,080 3,175 1,386 8,210 19,136
Netherlands 50 45 36 30 926 1,239 1,170 1,470 646 1,077 6,639
Hungary 63 63 108 180 2,150 1,005 1,100 2,601 9,819 14,324 31,350
Yugoslavia 25 26 7 98 1,894 140 126 322 320 7,661 10,594
Greece 3 8 7 6 121 147 326 514 676 2,131 3,936
UK 594 506 341 318 4,851 7,098 6,171 6,461 1,448 1,907 29,101
Spain 33 20 23 16 242 321 327 406 169 80 1,604
Poland 36 90 94 169 2,765 2,807 6,218 14,706 39,618 106,414 172,881
Czechoslovakia 16 26 15 61 479 462 888 2,754 783 18,788 24,256
France 2,411 1,781 1,836 842 10,443 7,538 5,399 8,050 1,662 3,050 40,601
Romania 50 76 107 330 5,722 14,607 18,418 86,184 32,462 117,950 275,856
Switzerland 85 69 52 71 904 706 634 886 253 131 3,706
Other 6 17 33 12 646 303 252 412 91 1,343 3,109
America/Ocea 3,813 3,437 3,687 21,718 33,367 39,369 45,040 42,400 6,922 3,822 7,754 211,329
Australia/NZL 66 44 53 68 1,017 959 1,275 833 120 119 4,488
Uruguay 73 76 107 105 724 2,014 2,199 1,844 425 66 7,560
Cen Am 91 120 77 102 125 8 104 129 43 17 725
Argentina 293 299 413 9,917 8,886 10,582 13,158 11,701 2,888 904 59,041
USA 2,159 1,809 1,706 1,098 15,480 18,904 20,963 18,671 1,553 1,711 81,895
Brazil 232 226 278 225 1,937 1,763 1,763 2,601 763 304 9,860
Venezuela 134 98 84 62 319 180 245 297 0 0 1,285
Mexico 72 76 56 70 916 993 861 736 168 48 3,924
Paraguay 4 3 6 7 21 62 73 210 42 0 424
Chile 61 56 77 85 521 1,040 1,180 1,790 401 48 5,198
Colombia 142 179 154 54 545 475 552 415 0 0 2,374
Canada 228 210 214 163 1,717 1,867 2,178 2,169 276 236 9,030
Other 258 241 462 94 1,159 522 500 1,125 91 327 4,521
Not known 6 0 3 4 419 469 394 911 3,307 20,014 52,786 78,307

References

  1. ^ The Messiah brought the first immigrants http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/941834.html
  2. ^ Morgenstern, Arie: Hastening Redemption: Messianism and the Resettlement of the Land of Israel Published in Hebrew, 1997, Jerusalem, Ma’or; Published in English, 2006, Oxford University Press
  3. ^ (Russian) Евреи диаспоры в наши дни[dead link] (Jews of diaspora today)
  4. ^ ИСТОРИЯ ИНАКОМЫСЛИЯ В СССР (The History of Dissident Movement in the USSR) by Ludmila Alekseyeva. Vilnius, 1992 [1]
  5. ^ [2][3]
  6. ^ "2002 : le racisme progresse en France, les actes antisémites se multiplient", Le Monde, 28 March, 2003

For the song by the Thievery Corporation, see Le Monde (song). ...

Further reading

  • Ben-Gurion, David From Class to Nation: Reflections on the Vocation and Mission of the Labor Movement (Hebrew), Am Oved (1976)

Ben Gurion redirects here. ...

External links

  • Nefesh B'Nefesh Aliyah from North America & The United Kingdom
  • The Aliyah Connection The NBN Aliyah Connection - Blog
  • Moving to Israel - The Complete Resource Guide
  • ISRAEMPLOY - Israel Aliyah Job List & Employment information
  • NOAM - Informations about Aliya Israel from German spreaking Countries
  • "Aliyah" - the word and its meaning
  • Dispersion and the Longing for Zion, 1240-1840, by Arie Morgenstern
  • Aliyah - Moving to Israel - Resource Directory
  • ImpactAliyah advocating Aliyah as a means to make a positive impact.
  • Kumah, a self-described "Neo-Zionist" group, calling for mass aliyah of American Jews.
  • Podovitz, site, including podcast of Liel Liebovitz, author of Aliya.
  • Aliyah, aliyah website including articles, interviews, blog and information, hosted by Laura Ben-David, author of MOVING UP: An Aliyah Journal
  • Aliyah sees 9% dip from 2005 (Haaretz)
  • Israel tries to increase immigration
This article is part of the
Jewish outreach series.
Orthodox outreach
Conservative outreach
Reform outreach
Conversion
Aliyah
Aliyah
Halakhic sources*
Texts in Jewish law relating to this article:
Bible: Numbers 33:53
Babylonian Talmud: Ketubot 110b, and others
Mishneh Torah: Shoftim, Hilkhot Melakhim 5:11
* Not meant as a definitive ruling. Some observances may be rabbinical, or customs, or Torah based.
Conservative Judaism outreach refers to those organizational and educational efforts by the Conservative Judaism and Masorti Jewish denominations meant to reach out and attract Jews and non-Jews, often the spouses and children in cases of Jewish intermarriage, to Judaism and to synagogue attendance. ... Reform Judaism outreach refers to those organizational and educational efforts by the Reform Judaism, Progressive Judaism and Liberal Judaism Jewish denominations meant to reach out and attract Jews and non-Jews, often the spouses and children in cases of Jewish intermarriage, to Judaism and to synagogue attendance. ... Conversion to Judaism (Hebrew גיור, giur, conversion) is the religious conversion of a previously non-Jewish person to the Jewish religion and to the Jewish people. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halocho and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... The Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazaka is a code of Jewish law by one of the most important Jewish authorities, Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, better known as Maimonides or by the Hebrew abbreviation RaMBaM (usually written Rambam in English). ... Posek (Hebrew פוסק, IPA: , pl. ... This article is about commandments in Judaism. ... Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of Judaisms rabbinic writing/s throughout history. ... Minhag (Hebrew: מנהג Custom, pl. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aliyah (650 words)
Aliyah Bet from 1933-1948 was largely clandestine due to ridiculous quotas by the British, despite the murder machine that was decimating the Jewish communities in Europe.
In 2002, a new fixture in the Aliyah world came to be called Nefesh B’Nefesh, which has revitalized North American Aliyah, having just brought in its 10,000th oleh in December of 2006.
She made Aliyah to enhance her life, and the lives of her husband and family, by living in the Promised Land, the Land of Israel, the only place that she can ever really 'belong'.
How to Aliyah (701 words)
Torah is read in the synagogue, and it is important to fulfill this mitzvah (commandment) with dignity, both out of respect for God and Torah, and out of respect for the congregation, on whose behalf you will be blessing the Torah.
Hence it is important to be familiar with the ritual of the aliyah and practice reciting the blessing aloud prior to the occasion, if the blessing is not familiar to you.
Please also note that the term "aliyah" refers not only to the honor of being called to bless the Torah, but to the section of text which is read between the blessings you will recite.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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