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Encyclopedia > Alice Hamilton
Dr. Alice Hamilton
Dr. Alice Hamilton

Alice Hamilton (February 27, 1869September 22, 1970) was the first woman appointed to the faculty of Harvard Medical School and was a leading expert in the field of occupational health. She was a pioneer in the field of toxicology, studying occupational illnesses and the dangerous effects of industrial metals and chemical compounds on the human body. Alice Hamilton, pioneer of occupational medicine in the United States, photo from Images from the History of Medicine, B014009 File links The following pages link to this file: Alice Hamilton Categories: National Institutes of Health images ... Alice Hamilton, pioneer of occupational medicine in the United States, photo from Images from the History of Medicine, B014009 File links The following pages link to this file: Alice Hamilton Categories: National Institutes of Health images ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... ... Toxicology (from the Greek words toxicos and logos [1]) is the study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms [2]. It is the study of symptoms, mechanisms, treatments and detection of poisoning, especially the poisoning of people. ... Physical Features of the Human Body The human body is the entire physical structure of a human organism. ...


Biography

Alice Hamilton was born in 1869 to Montgomery Hamilton and Gertrude Hamilton (nee Pond), in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She was the second of four girls, all of whom remained close throughout their childhood and into their professional careers. Among her sisters was classicist Edith Hamilton. Alice was home schooled and completed her early education at Miss Porter's School in Farmington, Connecticut. Nickname: Motto: Ke Ki On Ga Location in the state of Indiana, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded October 22, 1794 Incorporated February 22, 1840 Government  - Mayor Graham Richard (D)  - City Clerk Sandra Kennedy (D)  - City Council John N. Crawford (R) Samuel J. Talarico, Jr (R) John Shoaff (D... Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 - May 31, 1963) was a classicist and educator before she became a writer on mythology. ... Miss Porters School, sometimes simply referred to as Farmington, is a preparatory school for girls, located in Farmington, Connecticut. ... Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Incorporated 1645 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Kathleen Eagen  - Council chairman Michael Clark Area  - City 74. ...


In 1893, she received her doctor of medicine degree from the University of Michigan Medical School, and then completed internships at the Minneapolis Hospital for Women and Children and the New England Hospital for Women and Children. Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


Hamilton traveled to Europe to study bacteriology and pathology at universities in Munich and Leipzig from 1895 to 1897. When she returned to the U.S., she continued her postgraduate studies at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School. In 1897, she moved to Chicago, where she became a professor of pathology at the Woman's Medical School of Northwestern University. Microbiology (in Greek micron = small and biologia = studying life) is the study of microorganisms, including unicellular (single-celled) eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fungi, and viruses. ... A renal cell carcinoma (chromophobe type) viewed on a hematoxylin & eosin stained slide Pathologist redirects here. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... A renal cell carcinoma (chromophobe type) viewed on a hematoxylin & eosin stained slide Pathologist redirects here. ... Northwestern University (NU) is a selective private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ...


Soon after moving to Chicago, Hamilton became a member and resident of Hull House, the settlement house founded by social reformer Jane Addams. Living side by side with the poor residents of the community, she became increasingly interested in the problems workers faced, especially occupational injuries and illnesses. The study of 'industrial medicine' (the illnesses caused by certain jobs) had become increasingly important since the Industrial Revolution of the late nineteenth century had led to new dangers in the workplace. In 1907, Hamilton began exploring existing literature from abroad, noticing that industrial medicine was not being studied much in America. She set out to change this, and in 1908 published her first article on the topic. Hull House was co-founded in 1889, in Chicago, Illinois, by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. ... Laura Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) was a founder of the U.S. Settlement House movement, and the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1910 Hamilton was appointed to the newly formed Occupational Diseases Commission of Illinois, the first such investigative body in the United States. For next decade she investigated a range of issues for a variety of state and federal health committees. Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


In 1919, Hamilton was hired as assistant professor in a new Department of Industrial Medicine at Harvard Medical School, making her the first woman appointed to the faculty there. A New York Tribune article celebrated the appointment with the dramatic headline: "A Woman on Harvard Faculty—The Last Citadel Has Fallen—The Sex Has Come Into Its Own," but Hamilton was still discriminated against as a woman, excluded from social activities and the all-male graduation processions. Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ...


From 1924 to 1930, she served as the only woman member of the League of Nations Health Committee. At the 1925 Tetraethyl lead conference in Washington D.C. Dr. Hamilton was the most prominent critic of adding tetraethyl lead to gasoline. She also returned to Hull House every year until Jane Addams's death in 1935. For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1939–1941 semi-official emblem Anachronous world map in 1920–1945, showing the League of Nations and the world Capital Not applicable¹ Language(s) English, French and Spanish Political structure International organisation Secretary-general  - 1920–1933 Sir James Eric Drummond  - 1933–1940 Joseph Avenol  - 1940–1946 Seán Lester Historical... Tetra-ethyl lead (also known as TEL, lead tetraethyl and tetraethyllead) is a toxic organometallic chemical compound, with formula (CH2CH3)4Pb, which was once used as a gasoline (petrol) additive. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


After her retirement from Harvard in 1935, Hamilton served as a medical consultant to the U.S. Division of Labor Standards, and retained her connections to Harvard as professor emerita. She was included in the list of Men in Science in 1944 and received the Lasker Award in 1947. She died in 1970. Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards have been awarded annually since 1946 to living persons who have made major contributions to medical science. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1995 her extensive contributions to public health were commemorated by a U.S. Postal Service's commemorative stamp. In 2002 Alice Hamilton was designated an ACS National Historical Chemical Landmark in recognition of her role in the development of occupational medicine.http://acswebcontent.acs.org/landmarks/landmarks/hamilton/index.html] Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Public health is the study and practice of addressing threats to the health of a community. ... A USPS Truck at Night A U.S. Post Office sign The United States Postal Service (USPS) is the United States government organization responsible for providing postal service in the United States and is generally referred to as the post office. ... The ACS National Historic Chemical Landmarks Program was launched by the American Chemical Society in 1992 and has recognized over 50 landmarks to date. ...


References

Further reading

  • Exploring the Dangerous Trades: The Autobiography of Alice Hamilton, M.D. Northeastern University Press, 1985. ISBN 0-930350-81-2
  • Barbara Sicherman; Alice Hamilton. Alice Hamilton: A Life in Letters. Harvard University Press, 1984. ISBN 0-674-01553-3. Second publishing- University of Illinois Press, 2003. ISBN 0-252-07152-2.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alice Hamilton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (589 words)
She was a pioneer in the field of toxicology, studying occupational illnesses and the dangerous effects of industrial metals and chemical compounds on the human body.
Alice Hamilton was born in 1869 to Montgomery Hamilton and Gertrude (Pond) Hamilton, in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
Hamilton traveled to Europe to study bacteriology and pathology at universities in Munich and Leipzig from 1895 to 1897.
MSN Encarta - Alice Hamilton (563 words)
Alice Hamilton (1869-1970), American physician and pioneer in industrial toxicology, the study of poisonous substances in the workplace.
Hamilton was also actively involved in social reform, supporting causes as diverse as the enactment of worker compensation laws and the withdrawal of American troops during the Vietnam War.
Hamilton was born in New York City and raised in Indiana in a well-to-do family.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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