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Encyclopedia > Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Title page of the original edition (1865)
Author Charles "Lewis Carroll" Dodgson
Illustrator John Tenniel
Country England
Language English
Genre(s) Children's fiction
Publisher Macmillan
Publication date 1865
Media type Print
Followed by Through the Looking-Glass
Facsimile page from Alice's Adventures Under Ground
Facsimile page from Alice's Adventures Under Ground

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) is a work of literary nonsense written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, considered a classic example of the genre and of English literature in general.[1] It tells the story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit-hole into a fantastic realm populated by peculiar and anthropomorphic creatures. Alice in Wonderland may refer to: Alices Adventures in Wonderland, the most widely known and used title for the book written by Lewis Carroll Alice in Wonderland syndrome OR Alice in Wonderland (1903 film), silent motion picture Alices Adventures in Wonderland (1910 film), silent motion picture Alice in... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... 1889 Self-portrait Caterpillar using a hookah. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately-held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. ... Through the Looking Glass redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x970, 105 KB) Alices Adventures Under Ground, by Lewis Carroll - facsimile page - Project Gutenberg eText 19002 From Project Gutenbergs Alices Adventures Under Ground, by Lewis Carroll http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x970, 105 KB) Alices Adventures Under Ground, by Lewis Carroll - facsimile page - Project Gutenberg eText 19002 From Project Gutenbergs Alices Adventures Under Ground, by Lewis Carroll http://www. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Literary Nonsense refers to literature in which there are either nonsensical words, or the meaning does not make the slightest bit of sense. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alias. ... The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Rabbit Hole is a Tony-nominated play by David Lindsay-Abaire. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ...


The tale is filled with allusions to Dodgson's friends (and enemies), and to the lessons that British schoolchildren were expected to memorize. The tale plays with logic in ways that have made the story of lasting popularity with adults as well as children. It is considered to be one of the most characteristic examples of the genre of literary nonsense, and its narrative course and structure has been enormously influential, mainly in the fantasy genre (see Works influenced by Alice in Wonderland). Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ... Literary Nonsense refers to literature in which there are either nonsensical words, or the meaning does not make the slightest bit of sense. ... A narrative is a construct created in a suitable medium (speech, writing, images) that describes a sequence of fictional or non-fictional events. ... Lewis Carrolls books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass have continuously had a large cultural influence since they were published. ...


The book is commonly referred to by the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland, an alternative title popularized by the numerous stage, film and television adaptations of the story produced over the years. Some printings of this title contain both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There. Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a work of childrens literature by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), and is the sequel to Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ...

Contents

History

Alice was first published on 4 July 1865, exactly three years after the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat up the River Thames with three little girls:[2] is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Reverend Robinson Duckworth was present in the original boating expedition of July 4, 1862 during which Alices Adventures were first told by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ...

  • Lorina Charlotte Liddell (aged 13) ("Prima" in the book's prefatory verse)
  • Alice Pleasance Liddell (aged 10) ("Secunda" in the prefatory verse)
  • Edith Mary Liddell (aged 8) ("Tertia" in the prefatory verse)

The journey had started at Folly Bridge near Oxford and ended five miles away in the village of Godstow. To while away time the Reverend Dodgson told the girls a story that, not so coincidentally, featured a bored little girl named Alice who goes looking for an adventure. Alice Pleasance Liddell (May 4, 1852 – November 15, 1934) was the inspiration for childrens classic Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ... Folly Bridge is a stone bridge over the River Thames on the Abingdon Road south from central Oxford, England. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... The ruined Godstow Abbey. ...


The girls loved it, and Alice Liddell asked Dodgson to write it down for her. After a lengthy delay - over two years - he eventually did so and on 26 November 1864 gave Alice the manuscript of Alice's Adventures Under Ground. Some, including Martin Gardner, speculate there was an earlier version that was destroyed later by Dodgson himself when he printed a more elaborate copy by hand (Gardner, 1965), but there is no known prima facie evidence to support this. is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Martin Gardner (b. ...


But before Alice received her copy, MS Dodgson was already preparing it for publication and expanding the 18,000-word original to 35,000 words, most notably adding the episodes about the Cheshire Cat and the Mad Tea-Party. In 1865, Dodgson's tale was published as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by "Lewis Carroll" with illustrations by John Tenniel. The first print run of 2,000 was destroyed because Tenniel had objections over the print quality. (Only 23 copies are known to have survived; 18 are owned by major archives or libraries, such as the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, while the other five are held in private hands.) A new edition, released in December of the same year but carrying an 1866 date, was quickly printed. The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... 1889 Self-portrait Caterpillar using a hookah. ... Archive of the AMVC An archive refers to a collection of historical records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center is an archive at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in the collection of literary and other cultural artifacts from the United States, Great Britain, and France. ...


The entire print run sold out quickly. Alice was a publishing sensation, beloved by children and adults alike. Among its first avid readers were young Oscar Wilde and Queen Victoria. The book has never been out of print. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into 125 languages, including Esperanto and Faroese. There have now been over a hundred editions of the book, as well as countless adaptations in other media, especially theatre and film. Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... This article is about the language. ...


Publishing highlights

  • 1865: Alice has its first American printing.[3]
  • 1871: Dodgson meets another Alice during his time in London, Alice Raikes, and talks with her about her reflection in a mirror, leading to another book Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, which sells even better.
  • 1886: Carroll publishes a facsimile of the earlier Alice's Adventures Under Ground manuscript.
  • 1890: He publishes The Nursery "Alice", a special edition "to be read by Children aged from Nought to Five."
  • 1908: Alice has its first translation into Japanese.
  • 1960: American writer Martin Gardner publishes a special edition, The Annotated Alice, incorporating the text of both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. It has extensive annotations explaining the hidden allusions in the books, and includes full texts of the Victorian era poems parodied in them. Later editions expand on these annotations.
  • 1961: The Folio Society publication with 42 illustrations by John Tenniel.
  • 1964: Alicia in Terra Mirabili is published: the first Latin translation of the book.
  • 1998: One of the few surviving copies of the 1865 first edition is sold at auction for US$1.5 million, becoming the most expensive children's book ever traded. This record was effaced when a Harry Potter book by J.K. Rowling, The Tales of Beedle the Bard, was sold at auction at US$3.9 million in 2007.

Through the Looking Glass redirects here. ... The Nursery Alice is a shortened version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland, adapted by the author himself for children from nought to five with twenty of Tenniels illustrations from the original book colored and enlarged. ... Martin Gardner (b. ... The Annotated Alice is a work by Martin Gardner incorporating the text of Lewis Carrolls major tales - Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. ... Through the Looking Glass redirects here. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... The Luttrell Psalter (2006) Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (1962) The Wind in the Willows (2006) The Folio Society, founded in 1947, is based on the fringes of Bloomsbury, London. ... 1889 Self-portrait Caterpillar using a hookah. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... The Tales of Beedle the Bard is the title of a book of fairy tales Albus Dumbledore left Hermione Granger in his will. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Synopsis

cover of the 1898 edition
cover of the 1898 edition

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 447 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (455 × 610 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The 1898 version of this book was published before 1st Jan 1923 and the cover image is therefore deemed to be in the public domain in... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 447 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (455 × 610 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The 1898 version of this book was published before 1st Jan 1923 and the cover image is therefore deemed to be in the public domain in...

Chapter 1: Down the Rabbit Hole

Alice is sitting by her sister lazily and became a bit tired, and she sees a White Rabbit in a waistcoat carrying a watch. She follows it down a rabbit hole, and falls down a very long chamber full of strange things on shelves. After landing safely on the ground, she goes into a long hallway with a glass table with a gold key. Alice opens up a curtain and finds a small door, which the key fits in perfectly, and behind it is a beautiful garden, but she can't fit in. Alice then finds a small bottle labeled "DRINK ME," and drinks it. The drink causes her to shrink. Alice accidentally leaves the key on the table, and with her diminished stature can no longer reach it and becomes very scared. She then sees a cake that says "EAT ME," and proceeds to eat it.


Chapter 2: The Pool of Tears

The consumption of the cake makes Alice grow to be 9 feet tall. She cries, creating a pool of tears. The White Rabbit comes into the hallway, and is so frightened he drops his fan and kid-gloves. Alice then fans herself with his fan and kid-gloves, causing her to shrink again, but she stops before she goes out altogether. She swims through the pool of tears she had cried when she was larger, and finds a mouse who is awfully scared of cats. They wash up onto a bank, where they meet many birds and animals, who are also soaking wet.


Chapter 3: A Caucus Race and a Long Tale

A Dodo decides that the birds and animals should dry off with a Caucus Race, which has no rules except to run in a circle. After half an hour or so, the race ends and everyone wins, which means they all get prizes. Alice gives out her comfits as the prizes, and the Mouse tells Alice his long and sad tale of why he hates cats, which Alice misinterprets as "tail." The chapter ends with Alice alienating the participants of the race, resulting in her being left alone once again. For other uses, see Dodo (disambiguation). ... Comfit(s) Comfits are spices, dried fruits, or nuts, coated with sugar candy, often passed round during festivities. ...


Chapter 4: The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill

The White Rabbit mistakes Alice for his house maid, Mary Ann. He asks her to fetch a pair of gloves and a fan. Alice goes in to his house, and she finds a bottle. Though not labeled DRINK ME she drinks it anyway. The drink now makes her grow so big that she blocks the entrance and the White Rabbit is no longer able to get into the house. The White Rabbit asks a lizard named Bill to get her out. Bill climbs in through the chimney, but is kicked out by Alice's giant leg that is stuck there. The White Rabbit then decides out loud that house should be burned down, where Alice then responds fervently "If you do I'll set Dinah at you!", Dinah being a young kitten that Alice owns. Silence follows and then chatter about 'A barrowful will do, to begin with' followed by a shower of little pebbles being thrown through the window. The pebbles quickly turn into small cakes and Alice swallows one, suddenly causing her to shrink again to her earlier size. Back down to size Alice makes her way out of the house to find a small crowd of assorted animals, who in turn make a rush toward Alice when they see her. Quickly retreating into the nearby thick wood she finds herself confronted by an enormous puppy (note that Alice is merely a few inches tall at this time) and plays fetch with the puppy, tiring him into sleep. She rests for a moment herself, looking around and spotting a mushroom growing near her, she examines all angles of the mushroom and decides to have a peek at what might be on top of it. As she stands tiptoe and looks, her eyes meet with the ones of a blue Caterpillar, who is sitting arms folded quietly smoking a hookah. Egyptian hookah Hookah (Hindi: , Urdu: hukka) or shisha (Arabic: ‎, Hebrew: נרגילה) or (Turkish:nargile) is a single or multi-stemmed (often glass-based) water pipe device for smoking. ...


Chapter 5: Advice from a Caterpillar

Alice asks how she can get bigger, but the Caterpillar asks her to recite "Old Father William" instead. After doing so (with a few errors), the Caterpillar tells her that one side of the mushroom will make her bigger and the other side will make her smaller. The Caterpillar disappears leaving Alice all alone. Alice first tries the right side, which makes her chin get stuck to her foot. Then she tries the left side, which makes her neck grow very long. A pigeon flies into her face, believing she is a serpent, but Alice tells her that she is a little girl. She then eats different sides of the mushroom and gets back to her usual height.


Chapter 6: Pig and Pepper

Now at her right size, Alice comes upon a house with a Frog-Footman and a Fish-Footman in front. The Fish-Footman has an invitation for the Duchess, which he delivers to the Frog-Footman. Alice observes this transaction and, after a perplexing conversation with the frog, goes into the house and meets The Duchess, The Cook, The Baby, and The Duchess's Cheshire-Cat. The Cook is throwing dishes and making a soup which has too much pepper, which causes Alice, the Duchess and the baby, but not the cook or the Cheshire-Cat, to sneeze. The Duchess tosses her baby up and down while reciting the poem "Speak roughly to your little boy." When the poem is over, The Duchess gives Alice the baby while she leaves to go play croquet with the Queen. To Alice's surprise, the baby later turns into a pig, so she lets it go off into the woods. The Cheshire-Cat then appears in a tree, telling her about the Mad Hatter and the March Hare. He then disappears, his grin remaining behind to float on its own in the air. For the Smalltalk based 3D software platform, see Croquet project. ...


Chapter 7: A Mad Tea Party

Alice becomes a guest at a mad tea party, along with the Hatter, the March Hare, and the Dormouse. In the course of the party, Alice reveals that the date is May 4 (which happens to be the birthday of her presumed real-life counterpart, Alice Pleasance Liddell). The other characters give Alice many riddles and stories, until she becomes so insulted that she leaves, claiming that it was the stupidest tea party that she had ever been to. Alice comes upon a door in a tree, and enters it, and finds herself back in the long hallway. She opens the door, eats part of her mushroom, and shrinks so she can get into the beautiful garden.


Chapter 8: The Queen's Croquet Ground

Now in the beautiful garden, she comes upon 3 cards painting the roses on a rose tree red, for they accidentally planted a white-rose tree which the Queen of Hearts hates. A procession of more cards, kings and queens and even the White Rabbit comes into the garden. She meets the violent Queen of Hearts and the less violent King of Hearts. The Queen tells the executioner to chop off the three card gardeners' heads.


A game of croquet begins, with flamingos as the mallets and hedgehogs as the balls. The Queen condemns more people to death, and Alice once again meets the Cheshire Cat, who asks her how the queen is. The Queen of Hearts then tries to find out how they can chop off the Cheshire Cat's head, even though he is only a floating head. Alice asks her about the Duchess, so the Queen asks the executioner to get the Duchess out of prison.


Chapter 9: The Mock Turtle's story

The Duchess is brought to the croquet ground. She is now less angry and is always trying to find morals in things (she claims the pepper made her angry.) The Queen of Hearts then shows Alice the Gryphon, who takes her to the Mock Turtle. The Mock Turtle is very sad, even though he has no sorrow. He tries to tell his story about how he used to be a turtle, which The Gryphon interrupts so they can play a game.


Chapter 10: The Lobster Quadrille

The Mock Turtle and the Gryphon start dancing to the Lobster Quadrille, singing "Tis the Voice of the Lobster." The Mock Turtle then sings "Beautiful Soup" during which Alice and The Gryphon have to leave for a trial while The Mock Turtle continues singing.


Chapter 11: Who Stole the Tarts?

At the trial, the Knave of Hearts is accused of stealing the tarts. The jury box is made up of twelve animals, including Bill the Lizard, and the judge is the King of Hearts. The first witness is the Mad Hatter, who doesn't help the case at all. In some versions, the second witness is the Duchess's cook. The next and last witness though, is Alice.


Chapter 12: Alice's Evidence

Alice eats part of the mushroom, causing her to grow and accidentally knocks over the Jury Box. The Queen of Hearts is about to sentence them to death, but Alice calls them all just a pack of cards, causing them to swirl around her and turn into dead leaves. Alice's sister wakes her up, since it was all a dream. Alice tells her sister all about the strange dream she had just awoken from.


Characters in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

"The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing her flamingo"
"The chief difficulty Alice found at first was in managing her flamingo"
Peter Newell's illustration of Alice surrounded by the characters of Wonderland. (1890)
Peter Newell's illustration of Alice surrounded by the characters of Wonderland. (1890)

Image File history File links Alice_par_John_Tenniel_30. ... Image File history File links Alice_par_John_Tenniel_30. ... John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... The White Rabbit, as seen in Lewis Carrolls book Alice in Wonderland The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carrolls book Alice in Wonderland. ... The Mouse is a fictional character in Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ... The Dodo is a fictional character appearing in Chapters 2 and 3 of the book Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). ... The Lory is a character appearing in Chapter 2 and 3 of Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a reference to Lorina Charlotte Liddell, Alices older sister. ... The Eaglet is a character appearing in Chapter 2 and 3 of Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a reference to Edith Liddell, Alices sister. ... Spoiler warning: Bill the Lizard is a fictional character appearing in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Caterpillar using a hookah; an illustration by John Tenniel The Caterpillar is a fictional character appearing in Lewis Carrolls book, Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Alice and the Duchess The Duchess is a character invented by Lewis Caroll, who appeared for the first time in Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll, in 1865. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Hatter as depicted by Tenniel The Hatter, popularly known as The Mad Hatter (though he is never actually given that name in the book) is a fictional character encountered at a tea party and later as a witness at a trial in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in... The March Hare, often called the Mad March Hare, is a character from the tea party scene in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Mad Hatter with the Dormouse asleep on the left. ... Miss Piggy on The Muppet Show, as the Queen of Hearts The Queen of Hearts is a character from the book Alices Adventures in Wonderland by the mathematician Lewis Carroll. ... Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Mock Turtle and The Gryphon The Mock Turtle is a fictional character devised by Lewis Carroll from his popular book Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ...

Misconception of characters

Although Tweedledee, Tweedledum, Humpty Dumpty, and the Jabberwock are often thought to be characters in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, they actually only appear later in Through the Looking-Glass. They are, however, often included in film versions, which are usually simply called "Alice in Wonderland," often causing the confusion. Tweedledum and Tweedledee are characters in Lewis Carrolls Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There and in a nursery rhyme by an anonymous author. ... Tweedledum and Tweedledee are characters in Lewis Carrolls Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There and in a nursery rhyme by an anonymous author. ... This article is about the nursery rhyme. ... For other uses, see Jabberwocky (disambiguation). ... Through the Looking Glass redirects here. ...


Character allusions

The members of the boating party that first heard Carroll's tale all show up in Chapter 3 ("A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale") in one form or another. There is, of course, Alice herself, while Carroll, or Charles Dodgson, is caricatured as the Dodo. Carroll is known as the Dodo because Dodgson stuttered when he spoke, thus if he spoke his last name it would be Do-Do-Dodgson. The Duck refers to Rev. Robinson Duckworth, the Lory to Lorina Liddell, and the Eaglet to Edith Liddell.


Bill the Lizard may be a play on the name of Benjamin Disraeli. One of Tenniel's illustrations in Through the Looking-Glass depicts a caricature of Disraeli, wearing a paper hat, as a passenger on a train. The illustrations of the Lion and the Unicorn also bear a striking resemblance to Tenniel's Punch illustrations of Gladstone and Disraeli. Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ...


The Hatter is most likely a reference to Theophilus Carter, a furniture dealer known in Oxford for his unorthodox inventions. Tenniel apparently drew the Hatter to resemble Carter, on a suggestion of Carroll's. Theophilus Carter was an eccentric British inventor and furniture dealer most famous for his combination of an alarm clock and a bed, thought to be an inspiration for the illustration by Sir John Tenniel of Lewis Carrols characters the Mad Hatter in Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Hatta... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ...


The Dormouse tells a story about three little sisters named Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie. These are the Liddell sisters: Elsie is L.C. (Lorina Charlotte), Tillie is Edith (her family nickname is Matilda), and Lacie is an anagram of Alice. For the game, see Anagrams. ...


The Mock Turtle speaks of a Drawling-master, "an old conger eel", that used to come once a week to teach "Drawling, Stretching, and Fainting in Coils". This is a reference to the art critic John Ruskin, who came once a week to the Liddell house to teach the children drawing, sketching, and painting in oils. (The children did, in fact, learn well; Alice Liddell, for one, produced a number of skilled watercolours.) Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ...


The Mock Turtle also sings "Turtle Soup". This is a parody of a song called "Star of the Evening, Beautiful Star", which was performed as a trio by Lorina, Alice and Edith Liddell for Lewis Carroll in the Liddell home during the same summer in which he first told the story of Alice's Adventures Under Ground (source: the diary of Lewis Carroll, August 1, 1862 entry). is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ...


Contents

Poems and songs

How Doth the Little Crocodile is a poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in his novel, Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Isaac Watts (July 17, 1674 – November 25, 1748) is recognised as the Father of English Hymnody, as he was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. ... Against Idleness And Mischief is a poem in Divine Songs for Children, by Isaac Watts, and is one of his best known poems. ... The Mouses Tale is a concrete poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in his novel, Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Concrete poetry, pattern poetry or shape poetry is poetry in which the typographical arrangement of words is as important in conveying the intended effect as the conventional elements of the poem, such as meaning of words, rhythm, rhyme and so on. ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 – March 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called Lake Poets, and Poet Laureate. ... David Bates is a popular name. ... Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman redirects here. ... Mary Howitt (1799 — 1888) was an english poetess, and author of the famous poem The Spider and the Fly. She was born Mary Botham, at Coleford, in Gloucestershire, the daughter of Samuel and Ann Botham. ... Tis the Voice of the Lobster is a poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Sluggard is a moralistic poem by Isaac Watts which depicts the unsavory lifestyle of a slothful individual as a negative example. ...

Tenniel's illustrations

John Tenniel's illustrations of Alice do not portray the real Alice Liddell, who had dark hair and a short fringe. Carroll sent Tenniel a photograph of Mary Hilton Babcock, another child-friend, but whether Tenniel actually used Babcock as his model is open to dispute. 1889 Self-portrait Caterpillar using a hookah. ...


Famous lines and expressions

The term "Wonderland", from the title, has entered the language and refers to a marvellous imaginary place, or else a real-world place that one perceives to have dream like qualities. It, like much of the Alice work, is widely referred to in popular culture. Wonderland may refer to: // The setting of Lewis Carrolls book Alices Adventures in Wonderland A world in Kingdom Hearts; based on the Disney movie adaptation, which in turn was based on the book by Lewis Carroll A novel by Joyce Carol Oates. ... Lewis Carrolls books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass have continuously had a large cultural influence since they were published. ...

The White Rabbit.

"Down the Rabbit-Hole", the Chapter 1 title, has become a popular term for going on an adventure into the unknown. In computer gaming, a "rabbit hole" may refer to the initiating element that drives the player to enter the game. In drug culture, "going down the rabbit hole" is a metaphor for taking drugs. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ... Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use. ...


In Chapter 6, the Cheshire Cat's disappearance prompts Alice to say one of her most memorable lines: "...a grin without a cat! It's the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!"


In Chapter 7, the Hatter gives his famous riddle without an answer: "Why is a raven like a writing desk?" Although Carroll intended the riddle to have no solution, in a new preface to the 1896 edition of Alice, he proposes several answers: "Because it can produce a few notes, though… they are very flat; and it is nevar put with the wrong end in front!" (Note the spelling of "never" as "nevar"—turning it into "raven" when inverted. This spelling, however, was "corrected" in later editions to "never" and Carroll's pun was lost). Puzzle expert Sam Loyd offered the following solutions: A riddle is a statement or question having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved. ... For other uses, see Raven (disambiguation). ... Samuel Loyd (January 31, 1841 - April 10, 1911) was an American puzzle author and recreational mathematician. ...

  • Because the notes for which they are noted are not noted for being musical notes
  • Poe wrote on both
  • They both have inky quills
  • Bills and tales are among their characteristics
  • Because they both stand on their legs, conceal their steels (steals), and ought to be made to shut up

Many other answers are listed in The Annotated Alice. In Frank Beddor's novel Seeing Redd, the main antagonist, Queen Redd (a megalomaniac parody of the Queen of Hearts) meets Lewis Carroll and declares that the answer to the riddle is "Because I say so." Carroll is too terrified to contradict her. Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Annotated Alice is a work by Martin Gardner incorporating the text of Lewis Carrolls major tales - Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. ... Frank Beddor is a former World champion freestyle skier, a film producer, actor, stuntman, and author. ... Seeing Redd is the second book in the trilogy of the Looking Glass Wars. ... Megalomania currently refers to the following Wikipedia articles: Megalomania (mental illness), a pattern of character traits and behaviors. ... John Tenniels illustration of the King and Queen of Hearts at the trial of the Knave of Hearts. ...


Arguably the most famous quote is used when the Queen of Hearts screams "Off with her head!" at Alice (and everyone else she feels slightly annoyed with). Possibly Carroll here was echoing a scene in Shakespeare's Richard III (III, iv, 76) where Richard demands the execution of Lord Hastings, crying "Off with his head!" Shakespeare redirects here. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ... William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings of Hungerford (~1431 - 1483) became one of the great powers of the realm during the reign of Edward IV of England, but after being found for conspiracy against one time companion, Richard III, was executed a week later. ...


When Alice is growing taller after eating the cake labeled "Eat me" she says, "curiouser and curiouser", a famous line that is still used today to describe an event with extraordinary wonder.


Symbolism in the text

References to mathematics

Since Carroll was a mathematician at Christ Church, it has been suggested[4] that there are many references and mathematical concepts in both this story and also in Through the Looking-Glass; examples include: and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... Through the Looking Glass redirects here. ...

  • In chapter 1, "Down the Rabbit-Hole", in the midst of shrinking, Alice waxes philosophic concerning what final size she will end up as, perhaps "going out altogether, like a candle."; this pondering reflects the concept of a limit.
  • In chapter 2, "The Pool of Tears", Alice tries to perform multiplication but produces some odd results: "Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate!". This explores the representation of numbers using different bases and positional numeral systems (4 x 5 = 12 in base 18 notation; 4 x 6 = 13 in base 21 notation. 4 x 7 could be 14 in base 24 notation, following the sequence).
  • In chapter 5, "Advice from a Caterpillar", the Pigeon asserts that little girls are some kind of serpent, for both little girls and serpents eat eggs. This general concept of abstraction occurs widely in many fields of science; an example in mathematics of employing this reasoning would be in the substitution of variables.
  • In chapter 7, "A Mad Tea-Party", the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, and the Dormouse give several examples in which the semantic value of a sentence A is not the same value of the inverse of A (for example, "Why, you might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same thing as 'I eat what I see'!"); in logic and mathematics, this is discussing an inverse relationship.
  • Also in chapter 7, Alice ponders what it means when the changing of seats around the circular table places them back at the beginning. This is an observation of addition on a ring of the integers modulo N.

Wikibooks Calculus has a page on the topic of Limits In mathematics, the concept of a limit is used to describe the behavior of a function as its argument either gets close to some point, or as it becomes arbitrarily large; or the behavior of a sequences elements as... In mathematics, the base or radix is the number of various unique symbols (digits), including zero, that a positional numeral system uses to represent numbers in a given counting system. ... Positional notation or place-value notation is a numeral system in which each position is related to the next by a constant multiplier called the base (or radix) of that numeral system. ... A numeral is a symbol or group of symbols that represents a number. ... In mathematics, substitution of variables (also called variable substition or coordinate transformation) refers to the substitution or changing of certain variables with other variables. ... In logic and mathematics, the inverse relation of a binary relation is the binary relation defined by . ... In mathematics, a ring is an algebraic structure in which addition and multiplication are defined and have properties listed below. ... The word modulo (Latin, with respect to a modulus of ___) is the Latin ablative of modulus which itself means a small measure. ...

References to the French language

It has been suggested by several people including Martin Gardner and Selwyn Goodacre[4] that Dodgson had an interest in the French language, choosing to make references and puns about it in the story. It is most likely that these are references to French lessons which would have been a common feature of a Victorian middle-class girl's upbringing. A sampling of these include: Martin Gardner (b. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ...

  • In chapter 2, "The Pool of Tears", Alice imagines sending a present to her own foot; she addresses the foot as Alice's Right Foot, Esq.. Esquire is the description of a person whose gender is male; it has been suggested[4] that this is a play on the French word for foot. The word in French is le pied, and due to the rules of the language concerning noun gender, will always be addressed as masculine regardless of the gender of the owner of the foot.
  • Also in chapter 2, Alice posits that the mouse may be French and chooses to speak the first sentence of her French lesson-book to it: "Où est ma chatte?'", or "Where is my cat?"

This article is about the title. ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... In linguistics, grammatical gender is a morphological category associated with the expression of gender through inflection or agreement. ...

References to classical languages

  • In chapter 2, Alice initially addresses the mouse as "O Mouse", based on her vague memory of the noun declensions in her brother's textbook: "A mouse (nominative)-- of a mouse (genitive)-- to a mouse (dative)-- a mouse (accusative)-- O mouse! (vocative)". This corresponds to the traditional order that was established by Byzantine grammarians (and is still in standard use, except in the United Kingdom and some countries in Western Europe) for the five cases of Classical Greek; because of the absence of the ablative case, which Greek does not have but is found in Latin, the reference is apparently not to the latter as some have supposed.

In linguistics, declension is the inflection of nouns, pronouns and adjectives to indicate such features as number (typically singular vs. ... A multi-volume Latin dictionary in the University Library of Graz // Latin is not offered by the mainstream curriculum; however it is offered in many high schools throughout Australia. ... The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... Dative has several meanings. ... The term accusative may be used in the following contexts: A form of morphosyntactic alignment, as found in nominative-accusative languages. ... The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person being addressed, found in Latin among other languages. ... In linguistics, the ablative case is a noun case found in several languages, including Latin, Sanskrit and in the Finno_Ugric languages. ...

Historical references

  • In chapter 8, three cards are painting the roses on a rose tree red, for they accidentally planted a white-rose tree which the Queen of Hearts hates. Red roses symbolized the English House of Lancaster, while white roses were the symbol for their rival House of York. Therefore, this scene contains a hidden allusion to the Wars of the Roses.[5]

Queen of Hearts is the name of: one of the four Queens in several card games. ... The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ...

Cinematic adaptations

  • Alice in Wonderland (1903 film) - the first Alice movie by Cecil M. Hepworth. Parts of the movie are lost but what remains is available as a bonus feature on the 1966 BBC DVD;
  • Alice in Wonderland (1933 film) - motion picture
  • Alice in Wonderland (1946 film) directed by George More O'Ferrall, starring Vivien Pickles for BBC television
  • Alice in Wonderland (1951 Bunin film)PD - motion picture produced by Lou Bunin, blending live actors with stop-motion animated puppets, nicknamed "the lost Alice." It was suppressed by Disney to avoid competition with their release the same year.
  • Alice in Wonderland (1951 Disney film) animated feature. It popularized the iconic image of Alice in America as a pretty blonde girl in a white pinafore and a blue dress. The character designs owe much to the original iconic Tenniel illustrations. The Disney feature combines story elements from both Alice books. It is notable for its distinctly psychedelic visual feel.
  • The Adventures of Alice (1960 film) produced by Charles Le Faux, starring Gillian Ferguson for BBC television
  • Alice in Wonderland (1966 film) - directed by Jonathan Miller for BBC television
  • Alice of Wonderland in Paris - 1966 animated movie[6]
  • Alice in Wonderland (or What’s a Nice Kid Like You Doing in a Place Like This?) - Animated 1966 TV-movie by Hanna-Barbera.
  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1972 film) - motion picture
  • Alice in Wonderland (1976 film) - referred to as a "pornographic musical fantasy"
  • Alice in Wonderland (1981 film) (Russian: "Алиса в Стране Чудес"--transliteration: "Alisa in the Country of Miracles") - Soviet animated motion picture by Efim Pruzhanskiy[7]
  • Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland (1982 film) produced by John Clark Donahue, directed by John Driver, starring Annie Enneking, filmed stage play by Children's Theatre Company from USA
  • Fushigi no Kuni no Alice - 1983 animated series from Japan.
  • Alice in Wonderland (1985 film) - motion picture
  • Alice in Wonderland (1985 Anglia TV series) produced/directed by Harry Aldous, starring Giselle Andrews, puppetry/live action, five 20 minute episodes
  • Alice in Wonderland (1986 BBC TV series) produced by Terrance Dicks, written/directed by Barry Letts, starring Kate Dorning, four 30 minute episodes
  • The Care Bears Adventure In Wonderland (1987) - Animated movie
  • Alice in Wonderland (1988 film)PD - animated motion picture made in Australia
  • Alice (1988 film) - animated motion picture by Jan Švankmajer
  • Alice in Wonderland (1999 film) - made-for-television movie
  • Alice's Misadventures in Wonderland (2004 film)
PD:public domain

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1903 silent film directed by Cecil Hepworth and starring May Clark in this more twisted version of Wonderland. ... The movie Alice in Wonderland was first made in 1933 but was redone by Walt Disney in 1951. ... Lou Bunin was a prominent puppeteer and pioneer of stop-motion animation in the latter half of the twentieth century. ... A stop motion animation of a moving coin. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Girl wearing a white pinafore over her dress (about 1910). ... Alice in Wonderland (1966) was an adaptation for BBC television of the classic novel by Lewis Carroll. ... This article is about the British physician, theatre and opera director, and television presenter; for other people named Jonathan Miller, see Jonathan Miller (disambiguation). ... Alice in Wonderland (or What’s a Nice Kid Like You Doing in a Place Like This?) is a one-hour animated TV-movie, written by Bill Dana (who also voiced the White Knight), produced by Hanna-Barbera, and broadcast on the ABC network on March 30, 1966. ... Cartoon Network Studios, formerly known as Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ... Alices Adventures in Wonderland is a 1972 British musical film based on the Lewis Carroll novel of the same name. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1976 U.S. pornographic musical film, loosely based on Lewis Carrolls childrens book, starring Kristine DeBell as Alice. ... The Childrens Theatre Company (formerly The Moppet Players) is a regional theatre established in 1965 in Minneapolis Minnesota specializing in plays for families and young audiences and the recipient of a 2003 Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theatre. ... Alice in Wonderland (Japanese: ふしぎの国のアリス/Fushigi no Kuni no Arisu) is an anime adaptation of the novel Alice in Wonderland by the English author Lewis Carroll. ... This 1985 adaptation of Lewis Carrolls story, Alice in Wonderland, was made for television and used a huge all-star cast of notable actors and actresses, including Steve Allen, Lloyd Bridges, Red Buttons, Sid Caesar, Carol Channing, Sammy Davis Jr. ... Terrance Dicks (born 1935 in East Ham, London) is an English writer, best known for his work in television and for writing a large number of popular childrens books during the 1970s and 80s. ... Barry Letts Barry Letts is a British actor, television director and producer best known for his work on the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Alice is a 1988 surrealist film in Czech by Jan Svankmajer. ... Dimensions of Dialogue, 1982 Jan Å vankmajer (born 4 September 1934 in Prague) is a Czech surrealist artist. ... Alice in Wonderland was a television movie first broadcast in 1999 on NBC based upon Lewis Carrolls books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Live performance

Lewis Carroll's most famous work has also inspired numerous live performances, including plays, operas, ballets, and traditional English pantomimes. These works range from adaptations which are fairly faithful to the original book to those which use the story as a basis for new works. A good example of the latter is The Eighth Square, a murder mystery set in Wonderland. Written by Matthew Fleming and Music & Lyrics by Ben J Macpherson. This goth-toned rock musical premiered in 2006 at the New Theatre Royal in Portsmouth, England. For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pantomime (disambiguation). ... {{Infobox Cricketer | flag = Flag_of_England. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


With the immediate popularity of the book, it didn't take long for live performances to begin. One early example is Alice in Wonderland, a musical play by H. Saville Clark (book) and Walter Slaughter (music), which played in 1886 at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London. Alice in Wonderland is a musical by H. Saville Clark (1841-1893)[1] (book and lyrics) and Walter Slaughter (music). ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Walter Alfred Slaughter (17 February 1860--2 March 1908), was an English conductor and composer of musical comedy, comic opera and childrens shows. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Prince of Wales Theatre is a theatre located on Coventry Street, London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Over the years, many notable people in the performing arts have been involved in Alice productions. One of the most well-known American productions was Joseph Papp's 1980 staging of Alice in Concert at the Public Theater in New York City. Elizabeth Swados wrote the book, lyrics, and music. Based on both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, Papp and Swados had previously produced a version of it at the New York Shakespeare Festival. Meryl Streep played Alice, the White Queen, and Humpty Dumpty. The cast also included Debbie Allen, Michael Jeter, and Mark Linn-Baker. Performed on a bare stage with the actors in modern dress, the play is a loose adaptation, with song styles ranging the globe. Joseph Papp (1921 - 1991) was an American theatre producer and director. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Public Theater is a New York City arts organization. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... American musician, director, and composer, she has received five Tony award nominations and three Obie awards for her theatrical productions both on and off Broadway. ... New York Shakespeare Festival is the traditional name of a sequence of shows organized by the Public Theater in New York City, most often being held at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. ... Mary Louise Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award, Cannes Best Actress, Berlin Best Actress winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Debbie Allen (born Deborrah Kaye Allen on January 16, 1950 in Houston, Texas) is an American actor, choreographer, film director, television producer and a member of the Presidents Committee on the Arts and Humanities. ... Michael Jeter (August 26, 1952 - March 30, 2003) was a Tony and Emmy award winning American actor, well known for his work on stage and screen. ... Mark Linn-Baker (left) as Larry with Bronson Pinchot (right) as Balki on Perfect Strangers. ...


A free theatre script of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is available from FunAntics Theater Scripts here. It includes the original poems that schoolchildren were expected to recite such as "You are Old Father William" and "The Voice of the Sluggard" which Lewis Carroll satirized.


Similarly, the 1992 operatic production Alice used both Alice books as its inspiration. However, it also employs scenes with Charles Dodgson, a young Alice Liddell, and an adult Alice Liddell, to frame the story. Paul Schmidt wrote the play, with Tom Waits and Kathleen Brennan writing the music. Although the original production in Hamburg, Germany, received only a small audience, Tom Waits released the songs as the album Alice in 2002, to much acclaim. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... Kathleen Brennan was born in Johnsburg, Illinois, as noted by musician Tom Waits in the song of the same name. ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... Alice is an album by Tom Waits, released in 2002 on Epitaph Records (under the Anti sub-label). ...


In addition to professional performances, school productions abound. Both high schools and colleges have staged numerous versions of Alice-inspired performances. The imaginative story and large number of characters are well-suited to such productions.


A large-scale operatic adaptation of the story by the Korean composer Unsuk Chin to an English language libretto by David Henry Hwang received its world premiere at the Bavarian State Opera on June 30, 2007. Unsuk Chin (born July 14, 1961, Seoul) is a female Korean composer of classical music, based in Berlin, Germany. ... David Henry Hwang (born August 11, 1957) is a contemporary American playwright who has risen to prominence as the preeminent Asian American dramatist in the U.S. He was born in Los Angeles, California and was educated at Stanford University and the Yale School of Drama. ... Munich, National Theatre The Bayerische Staatsoper or Bavarian State Opera is an opera company in Munich and is one of the leading opera companies in Germany and the world and has existed since 1653. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Criticism

The book was generally received in a positive light, but has also caught a large amount of derision for its strange and unpredictable tone. One of the best-known critics is fantasy writer Terry Pratchett, who has openly stated that he dislikes the book.[8] Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ...


In 1931, the book was banned in Hunan, China because "animals should not use human language" and it "put animals and human beings on the same level."[9] Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Many societies have banned certain books. ... Not to be confused with the unrelated provinces of Hainan, Henan, and Yunnan. ...


Works influenced

Alice and the rest of Wonderland continue to inspire or influence many other works of art to this day, sometimes indirectly via the Disney movie, for example. The character of the plucky, yet proper, Alice has proven immensely popular and inspired similar heroines in literature and pop culture, many also named Alice in homage. Lewis Carrolls books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass have continuously had a large cultural influence since they were published. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Radio Pictures. ...


Media

Librivox is a digital library of free public domain audio books, read by volunteers. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_1. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_2. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_3. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_4. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_5. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_6. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_7. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_8. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_9. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_10. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_11. ... Image File history File links Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland,_chapter_12. ...

Other tributes to the story

The city of Warrington in Cheshire, the nearest city to the village of Daresbury where the Reverend Dodgson lived and worked, has several statues of figures from the story. The church in Daresbury, likewise, memorialises the story in several stained glass windows.


See also

Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), or micropsia, is a disorienting neurological condition which affects human visual perception. ...

References

  1. ^ BBC's Greatest English Books list
  2. ^ [1]. Bedtime Stories History of Alice. Retrieved January 29, 2007.
  3. ^ Carroll, Lewis (1995). The Complete, Fully Illustrated Works. New York: Gramercy Books. ISBN 0-517-10027-4. 
  4. ^ a b c Gardner, Martin (1990). More Annotated Alice. New York: Random House, 363. ISBN 0-394-58571-2. 
  5. ^ Other explanations | Lenny's Alice in Wonderland site
  6. ^ IMDB - Alice of Wonderland in Paris (1966)
  7. ^ IMDB - Alisa v strane chudes (1981)
  8. ^ "Words from the Master". Retrieved from Unseen University January 29, 2007.
  9. ^ "Banned Books Week: September 25-October 2. University of California, San Diego Social Sciences & Humanities Library. Retrieved January 29, 2007.

Bedtime Stories is a musical album by pop musician Madonna, see: Bedtime Stories. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

Online texts

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... HTML, an initialism of HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... For other uses, see Sisu (disambiguation). ...

Illustrations

Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Through the Looking Glass redirects here. ... John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... The White Rabbit, as seen in Lewis Carrolls book Alice in Wonderland The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carrolls book Alice in Wonderland. ... The Mouse is a fictional character in Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ... The Dodo is a fictional character appearing in Chapters 2 and 3 of the book Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). ... The Lory is a character appearing in Chapter 2 and 3 of Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a reference to Lorina Charlotte Liddell, Alices older sister. ... The Eaglet is a character appearing in Chapter 2 and 3 of Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a reference to Edith Liddell, Alices sister. ... Spoiler warning: Bill the Lizard is a fictional character appearing in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Caterpillar using a hookah; an illustration by John Tenniel The Caterpillar is a fictional character appearing in Lewis Carrolls book, Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Alice and the Duchess The Duchess is a character invented by Lewis Caroll, who appeared for the first time in Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll, in 1865. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Batman supervillain, see Mad Hatter (comics). ... The March Hare, often called the Mad March Hare, is a character from the tea party scene in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Mad Hatter with the Dormouse asleep on the left. ... John Tenniels illustration of the King and Queen of Hearts at the trial of the Knave of Hearts. ... Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Mock Turtle and The Gryphon The Mock Turtle is a fictional character devised by Lewis Carroll from his popular book Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... John Tenniel illustrated the first editions of the Alice books. ... Tweedledum and Tweedledee are characters in Lewis Carrolls Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There and in a nursery rhyme by an anonymous author. ... This article is about the nursery rhyme. ... For the Batman supervillain, see Mad Hatter (comics). ... The March Hare, often called the Mad March Hare, is a character from the tea party scene in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Lion and the Unicorn are time-honoured symbols of the United Kingdom. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1903 silent film directed by Cecil Hepworth and starring May Clark in this more twisted version of Wonderland. ... The movie Alice in Wonderland was first made in 1933 but was redone by Walt Disney in 1951. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1951 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney and originally premiered in London, England on July 26, 1951 by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Alice in Wonderland (1966) was an adaptation for BBC television of the classic novel by Lewis Carroll. ... Alices Adventures in Wonderland is a 1972 British musical film based on the Lewis Carroll novel of the same name. ... Alice in Wonderland is a 1976 U.S. pornographic musical film, loosely based on Lewis Carrolls childrens book, starring Kristine DeBell as Alice. ... This 1985 adaptation of Lewis Carrolls story, Alice in Wonderland, was made for television and used a huge all-star cast of notable actors and actresses, including Steve Allen, Lloyd Bridges, Red Buttons, Sid Caesar, Carol Channing, Sammy Davis Jr. ... Alice is a 1988 surrealist film in Czech by Jan Svankmajer. ... Originally released directly to video in 1995, Alice in Wonderland is a 46-minute animated film based on the classic novel, Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ... Alice in Wonderland was a television movie first broadcast in 1999 on NBC based upon Lewis Carrolls books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. ... How Doth the Little Crocodile is a poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in his novel, Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Mouses Tale is a concrete poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in his novel, Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat is a poem recited by the Mad Hatter in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Tis the Voice of the Lobster is a poem by Lewis Carroll which appears in Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... For other uses, see Jabberwocky (disambiguation). ... The Walrus and the Carpenter speaking to the Oysters, as portrayed by illustrator John Tenniel The Walrus and the Carpenter is a poem by Lewis Carroll that appeared in his book Through the Looking-Glass, published in December 1871. ... Haddocks Eyes is a poem by Lewis Carroll from Through the Looking-Glass. ... The Bellman supporting the Banker by a finger entwined in his hair The Hunting of the Snark (An Agony in 8 Fits) is a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) in 1874, when he was 42 years old. ... Alice Pleasance Liddell (May 4, 1852 – November 15, 1934) was the inspiration for childrens classic Alices Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. ... Alices Shop on St Aldates. ... 1889 Self-portrait Caterpillar using a hookah. ... The Annotated Alice is a work by Martin Gardner incorporating the text of Lewis Carrolls major tales - Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. ... The Nursery Alice is a shortened version of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland, adapted by the author himself for children from nought to five with twenty of Tenniels illustrations from the original book colored and enlarged. ... Lewis Carrolls books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass have continuously had a large cultural influence since they were published. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Alices Adventures in Wonderland - Referat (562 words)
Alice finds interest in a white rabbit, dressed in a coat and muttering “I’m late!”, whom she follows down a rabbit-hole.
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Alice asks them why they are doing that and they answered her that the queen wants to have red roses, otherwise they would lose there heads.
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He based the central character on Alice herself, and wove into the story many of the places and things which they'd seen on their outings in Oxford.
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