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Encyclopedia > Ali Vardi Khan
Ali Vardi Khan
Birth name: Mirza Muhammad Madani
Title: Nawab of Bengal, Bihar and Orissa
Birth: Unknown
Nationality: Turk
Religion: Muslim (shiite)
Death: 1756
Succeeded by: grandson Siraj-ud-Dowla
Children:
  • Ghasheti Begum or Meher-Un-Nisa, Daughter
  • Maymuna Begum, Daughter
  • Amena Begum, Daughter

Ali Vardi Khan was the independent nawab or ruler of Bengal between 1740 and 1756. His real name was Mirza Vandae or Mirza Muhammad Ali. He hailed originally from Turkey and was a Shiite muslim. His father was Mirza Muhammad Madani - an employee under India’s Mughal Empire ruler Aurangzeb’s son Azam Shah. Azam shah employed the sons of Mirza Muhammad when they got adult. After the death of Azam shah the family got into poverty. Muhammad Ali and Mirza Ahmed two brother were seeking for a job again and got employeed under Orissa’s subdedar Suza-ud-Din. After promoting in nawab status of Suza-ud-din the two brother's future prospects widened. In 1728, Suza-ud-din promoted Muhammad ali to ‘Fauzdar’ (General) and entitled him as Ali Vardi. In 1733, he was assigned as Bihar’s assistant Subedar (governor). Nawab (Urdu: نواب ) was originally the subadar (provincial governor) or viceroy of a subah (province) or region of the Mughal empire. ... Bengal, known as Bôngo (Bengali: বঙ্গ), Bangla (বাংলা), Bôngodesh (বঙ্গদেশ), or Bangladesh (বাংলাদেশ) in Bangla, is a region in the northeast of South Asia. ... For other uses, see Bihar (disambiguation). ... Orissa   (Devanagari: उड़ीसा) (2001 provisional pop. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Siraj-ud-daulah acquired much notoriety both among the British and the Indians. ... Nawab (Urdu: نواب ) was originally the subadar (provincial governor) or viceroy of a subah (province) or region of the Mughal empire. ... Bengal, known as Bôngo (Bengali: বঙ্গ), Bangla (বাংলা), Bôngodesh (বঙ্গদেশ), or Bangladesh (বাংলাদেশ) in Bangla, is a region in the northeast of South Asia. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... The Mughal Empire at its greatest extent. ... Aurangzeb (borrowed from early Persian, اورنگ‌زیب Awrang throne and Zayb beauty, ornament),(November 3, 1618 – March 3, 1707, also known as Alamgir I, was the ruler of the Mughal Empire from 1658 until 1707. ... Azam Shah (1653 - 1707) was the Mogul emperor of India in 1707. ... Orissa   (Devanagari: उड़ीसा) (2001 provisional pop. ... For other uses, see Bihar (disambiguation). ...


But, hunger for power was rising in the mind of Ali Vardi Khan[citation needed]. He started thinking to get the nawab’s power of Bengal[citation needed]. On 1740 he deposed Suza-ud-din from power, getting the Nawab status of Bengal and also got recognition from Mughal emperor Muhammad Shah.


He died in 1756. His grandson Siraj-ud-Dowla succeeded Ali Vardi Khan as the Nawab of Bengal in April 1756 at the age of 27. Siraj-ud-daulah acquired much notoriety both among the British and the Indians. ...


References

  • AliVardi Khan and his times, Author - K.K. Dutt
  • Decisive Battle of India, G.B. Malleson, ISBN 81-7536-291-X , published by Books For All, 2002.

 
 

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