FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Algonquin" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Algonquin
Algonquin
Total population

11,000

Regions with significant populations
Quebec, Ontario
Language(s)
French, English, Algonquin
Religion(s)
Midewiwin
Related ethnic groups
Abnaki, Innu, Anicinàpek (Nipissing, Ojibwa, Mississaugas, Saulteaux, Odawa and Potawatomi)
This article is about the Native American tribe. For other uses see: Algonquin (disambiguation)

The Algonquins (or Algonkins) are an aboriginal North American people speaking Algonquin, an Anishinaabe language. Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anicinàpe grouping. The Algonquin peoples call themselves either Omàmiwinini (plural: Omàmiwininiwak) or the more generalised name of Anicinàpe. This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Algonquin (or Algonkin) is an Algonquian language closely related to Ojibwe. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... Abenaki wigwam with birch bark covering The Abenaki (also Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans belonging to the Algonquian peoples of the Northeast portion of North America. ... Innu flag Innu communities of Québec and Labrador The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of what Canadians refer to as eastern Québec and Labrador, Canada. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... The Nipissing First Nation consists of first nation (i. ... This article is about the native North American people. ... The Mississaugas are a native people located in Southern Ontario. ... The Saulteaux are a First Nation in Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa or Odaawa) are a Native American people. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... Algonquin is the name of a Native American tribe and some places in the United States of America and Canada. ... Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Algonquin (or Algonkin) is an Algonquian language closely related to Ojibwe. ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ...


The term "Algonquin" derives from the Maliseet word elakómkwik (IPA: [ɛlæˈɡomoɡwik]), "they are our relatives/allies".[1][2]The tribe has also given its name to the much larger, heterogeneous group of Algonquian-speaking peoples who stretch from Virginia to the Rocky Mountains and north to Hudson Bay. Most Algonquins, however, live in Quebec; the nine Algonquin bands in that province and one in Ontario have a combined population of about 11,000. (Popular usage reflects some confusion on the point, in that the term "Algonquin" is sometimes used—for example in this entry in the Catholic Encyclopedia—to refer to all Algonquian-speaking societies). The Maliseet (also known as Wolastoqiyik and Malecite and in French also as Malécites or Étchemins (the latter collectively referring to the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy)) are a Native American/First Nations people who inhabit the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, roughly overlapping the International Boundary between New... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Hudson Bay, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Contents

Culture

Many Algonquins still speak the Algonquin language, called generally as Anicinàpemowin or specifically as Omàmiwininìmowin. The language is considered one of several divergent dialects of the Anishinaabe languages. Among younger speakers, the Algonquin language has experienced strong word borrowings from the Cree language.[3] Traditionally, the Algonquins lived in either a birch bark wìkiwàm or in wooden mìkiwàm,[4] though Algonquins today live in housing much like that of the general public. Traditionally, the Algonquins were practitioners of Midewiwin; they believed they were surrounded by many manitòk. With the arrival of the French, many Algonquins were proselytized to Christianity, but many still practise Midewiwin or co-practise Christianity and Midewiwin. Algonquin (or Algonkin) is an Algonquian language closely related to Ojibwe. ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... Cree is the name for a group of closely-related Algonquian languages spoken by approximately 50,000 speakers across Canada, from Alberta to Labrador. ... Birch bark or birchbark is generally understood to be the bark of the Paper Birch tree (Betula papyrifera), or sometimes of related species such as Gray (Wire) Birch (Betula populifolia). ... Apache wickiup, by Edward S. Curtis, 1903 A wigwam or wickiup is a domed single-room dwelling used by certain Native American tribes. ... Apache wickiup, by Edward S. Curtis, 1903 A wigwam or wickiup is a domed single-room dwelling used by certain Native American tribes. ... The Midewiwin (also spelled Midewin and Medewiwin) is from the term for the Grand Medicine Society of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England and Great Lakes regions in North America. ... Manitou may refer to: Manitou, Oklahoma Manitou, Manitoba Manitou River (Ontario) Manitou, New York train station Manitou, the German-style board game Gitche Manitou, the Great Spirit among Native American and First Nations cultures. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


History

In the earliest oral history, the Algonquins were from the Atlantic coast. Together with other Anicinàpek, they arrived at the "First Stopping Place" near Montreal. While the other Anicinàpe peoples continued their journey up the St. Lawrence River, the Algonquins settled along the Kitcisìpi (Ottawa River), an important highway for commerce, cultural exchange, and transportation from time immemorial. A distinct Algonquin identity, though, was not fully-realized until after the dividing of the Anicinàpek at the "Third Stopping Place", estimated at about 5,000 years ago near present day Detroit. The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... This is about the river in Canada. ... Detroit redirects here. ...


After contact with the Europeans, the Algonkins became one of the key players in the Fur Trade. This lead them to fight against the Iroquois due to their rivalry in the fur trade; and formed an alliance with the Montagnais to the east in 1570. An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of the Quebec-Labrador peninsula in Eastern Canada. ... Events January 23 - The assassination of regent James Stewart, Earl of Moray throws Scotland into civil war February 25 - Pope Pius V excommunicates Queen Elizabeth I of England with the bull Regnans in Excelsis May 20 - Abraham Ortelius issues the first modern atlas. ...


The first group of Algonquian that the French encountered were the Kitcisìpiriniwak ("Ottawa River Men"; singular: Kitcisìpirini) whose village was located on an island in the Ottawa River; the French called this group "La Nation de l'Isle." The first recorded meeting between Europeans and Algonquins occurred at Tadoussac in the summer of 1603, when Samuel de Champlain came upon a party of Algonquins, lead by the Kitcisìpirini Chief Tessouat. They were celebrating with the Montagnais and Etechemins (Malecite) a recent victory over the Five Nations Iroquois. Champlain did not understand the strong totem/clan system that socially united the Algonquins rather than the European-styled politically united concept of nationhood. Consequently, there were several Algonquin bands, each with its own chief, needing political approval from each of the band's clan leaders. So, from 1603 some of the Algonquins allied themselves with the French under Samuel de Champlain. Contemporary Tadoussac Tadoussac in about 1612, illustrated by Samuel de Champlain Tadoussac is a village of 857 inhabitants (2005) in Quebec, Canada which was once an important seventeenth century French trading post. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ... Tessouat (c. ... The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of the Quebec-Labrador peninsula in Eastern Canada. ... The Maliseet (also known as Wolastoqiyik and in French also as Étchemins and Malécites) are a Native American tribe that inhabits the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, roughly overlapping the International Boundary between New Brunswick and Quebec in Canada, and Maine in the United States. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... A totem is any entity which watches over or assists a group of people, such as a family, clan or tribe (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary [1] and Websters New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition). ...


Champlain made his first exploration of the Ottawa River during May, 1613 and reached the fortified Kitcisìpirini village at Morrison Island. Unlike the other Algonquin communities, Kitcisìpiriniwak did not change location with the seasons. They had chosen a strategic point astride the trade route between the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence and had prospered through the collection of beaver pelts from native traders passing through their territory. They pointed with great pride to their corn fields, a skill that they seemed to have acquired just before the arrival of the French. At first, the term "Algonquin" was used only for a second group, the Wàwàckeciriniwak. However, by 1615 the name was applied to all of the Algonquin bands living along the Ottawa River. Because of keen interest to gain control of the lower Ottawa River the Kitcisìpiriniwak and the Wàwàckeciriniwak came under fierce opposition. These two large groups allied together, under the leadership of Sachem Charles Parcharini, maintaining the Omàmiwinini identity and territory. Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ... This is about the river in Canada. ...


The Algonquin Indians were the victims of unfortunate European politics. The banding together of the Iroquois Confederacy had driven the Algonquins from lands that were once theirs, and when the French arrived trading firearms for furs, the Algonquins jumped at the deal. Though the French were good friends to the Algonquins, they did not make such good allies. The powerful Iroquois, aided first by the Dutch and later by the English, defeated the French and Algonquins alike. Though the Algonquins were defeated, they were never destroyed, and the Algonquin Indian culture lives on in pockets of their once-vast territory.


In 1632, after Sir David Kirke's occupation of New France had demonstrated French colonial vulnerability, the French began to trade muskets to the Algonquins and their allies. French Jesuits began to actively seek Algonquin conversions to Roman Catholicism, opening up a bitter divide between traditionalists and converts. See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... Sir David Kirke (ca. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Through all of these years, the Iroquois had never dared to attack the Kitcisìpirinik fortress, but in 1642 a surprise winter raid hit the Algonkin while most of their warriors were absent and inflicted severe casualties. On March 6th (Ash Wednesday), 1647, a large Mohawk war party hit the Kitcisìpiriniwak living near Trois-Rivières and almost exterminated them. The Kitcisìpiriniwak were still at Morrison Island in 1650 and inspired respect with their 400 warriors. When the French retreated from the Huron country that year, Tessouat is reported to have had the superior of the Jesuit mission suspended by his armpits because he refused to offer him the customary presents for being allowed to travel through Algonquin territory. Some joined the mission at Sillery and were mostly destroyed by an epidemic by 1676. Others, encouraged by the French, remained at Trois-Rivières and their settlement at nearby Pointe-du-Lac remained until about 1830, when the last 14 families, numbering about 50 moved to Oka. The Sulpician Mission of the Mountain was founded at Montreal in 1677, and some Algonquins settled there together with Iroquois converts. However many did maintain attachment to the traditional territory and the trading traditions. While those that agreed to move to the established reserves or joined other historic bands and were then federally "recognized" many others did not re-locate and were later referred to as "stragglers" in the Ottawa and Pontiac Counties. In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... Location City Information Established: January 1, 2002 Area: 228. ... Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Situation with respect to Montreal, to the East Oka, Quebec is a village on the northern bank of the Ottawa River, northwest of Laval on Quebec route 344. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... 1677 (MDCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Starting in 1721, many Christian Algonquins began to summer at Oka, a Mohawk settlement near Montreal that was then considered one of the Seven Nations of Canada. Algonquin warriors continued to fight in alliance with France until the British conquest of Quebec in 1760. Fighting on behalf of the British Crown, the Algonquins took part in the Barry St Leger campaign during the American Revolutionary War. Year 1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Situation with respect to Montreal, to the East Oka, Quebec is a village on the northern bank of the Ottawa River, northwest of Laval on Quebec route 344. ... This article is about the people known as Mohawk. For other uses, see Mohawk. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... The Seven Nations of Canada were a historic confederation of Canadian First Nations living in and around the Saint Lawrence River valley, who were allied to New France and often included substantial numbers of Roman Catholics. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Barrimore Matthew St. ... This article is about military actions only. ...


Loyalist settlers began encroaching on Algonquin lands shortly after the Revolution. Later in the 19th century, the lumber industry began to move up the Ottawa valley, and some Algonquins were relegated to a string of small reserves. Britannia gives a heros welcome to returning American Loyalists. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... This is about the river in Canada. ...


Economy

Although the historical Algonquin society was largely hunting- and fishing-based, some Algonquins practiced agriculture and cultivated corn, beans, and squash, the famous "Three Sisters" of indigenous horticulture. Bring primarily a hunting Nation, mobility was essential. Material used had to be light and easy to transport. Canoes were made of birch bark, sowed with spruce roots and render waterproof by the application of heated up spruce resin and grease. It was easy to move and the material readily available. During winter, toboggans were used to transport material and people used snowshoes to get around. For babies, tikinàgan (cradleboard) were used to carry them. It was built with wood and covered with an envelope made of leather or material. The baby was standing up with his feet resting on a small board. The mother would then put the tikinàgan on her back. This allowed the infant to look around and observe his surroundings, therefore start learning how everyday tasks were done. This article is about the maize plant. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash C. moschata- butternut squash C. pepo- most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 223652002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... The Three Sisters are the three main agricultural crops of some Native American groups in North America: squash, maize, and climbing beans (typically tepary beans or common beans). ...


Algonquian-speaking people also practiced large amounts of agriculture, particularly south of the Great Lakes where the climate allows for a larger growing season. Other notable indigenous crops historically farmed by Algonquins are the sunflower and tobacco. Even among groups who mainly hunted, agricultural products were an important source of food and were obtained by trading with or raiding societies that practiced larger amounts of agriculture. For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ...


Archeological sites on Morrison Island near Pembroke, within the territory of the Kitcisìpiriniwak, reveal a 1000-year-old culture that manufactured copper tools and weapons. Copper ore was extracted north of Lake Superior and distributed down to today's northern New York state. Local pottery artifacts from this period show widespread similarities that indicate the continuing use of the river for cultural exchange throughout the Canadian Shield and beyond. Some centuries later the Algonquin tribe moved in and inhabited the islands and shores along the Ottawa, and by the 1600s the first Europeans found them well-established as a hunter-gatherer society in control of the river. The Kitcisìpiriniwak showed entrepreneurial spirit. On Morrison Island, at the location of where 5000-year-old copper artifacts were discovered, the Kitcisìpirini band levied a toll on canoe flotillas descending the river. Pembroke (population 13,490 in the 2001 Canadian census) is a city at the confluence of the Muskrat River and the Ottawa River in the Ottawa Valley in eastern Ontario, Canada. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield— also called the Precambrian Shield, Laurentian Shield, Bouclier Canadien (French), or Laurentian Plateau— is a large shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American craton. ...


Modern events

In 1982, members of the Algonquin tribe successfully blockaded a commercial rice-harvesting venture that was given federal governmental permission to harvest the wild rice that the tribe has traditionally gathered by hand for centuries[5]. Hundreds of people blockaded roads, and despite police helicopters, paddywagons, and "a lot of hostility and pushing and shoving," according to Harold Perry, honorary chief of the Ardoch Algonquins, the tribe and its supporters held their ground for 27 days -- long enough for the federal government to reverse its decision and revoke the commercial permit. Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


In recent years, tensions with the lumber industry have flared up again among Algonkin communities, in response to the practice of clear-cutting. In Ontario, an ongoing Algonkin land claim has, since 1983, called into dispute much of the southeastern part of the province, stretching from near North Bay to near Hawkesbury and including Ottawa, Pembroke, and most of Algonquin Provincial Park. Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... North Bay ( , time zone EST) is a city in Northeastern Ontario, Canada (2006 population 53,966). ... Hawkesbury is a town in Eastern Ontario on the Ottawa River, near the Quebec/Ontario border. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Pembroke (population 13,490 in the 2001 Canadian census) is a city at the confluence of the Muskrat River and the Ottawa River in the Ottawa Valley in eastern Ontario, Canada. ... Algonquin Provincial Park is a provincial park located between Georgian Bay and the Ottawa River in central Ontario. ...


In 2000, Algonkins from Timiskaming First Nation played a significant part in the local popular opposition to the plan to convert Adams Mine into a garbage dump. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Timiskaming is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Adams Mine is an abandoned open pit mine in Boston Township near Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which was the cornerstone of a controversial waste management plan in the 1990s. ...


In 2007, a part of Liberty City in the game Grand Theft Auto IV will be named Algonquin. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Liberty City is a fictional city in the Grand Theft Auto (GTA) series that is loosely based on New York City. ... Grand Theft Auto IV (also known as GTA IV or GTA 4) is the upcoming eleventh instalment, and first in the fourth generation, of the Grand Theft Auto video game franchise, announced for release by Rockstar Games within February–April of 2008 for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. ...


Current Events

Members of the Algonquin tribe have been peacefully blockading a uranium mining operation on their sacred lands north of Kingston, Ontario since June 29, 2007.[6] Oakville-based Frontenac Ventures, the prospecting company, is suing the Algonquins for $77 million and is seeking a court order that would force the protesters from the area. So far, however, they have been unsuccessful in doing so. If the order is granted, some protesters have voiced fears of a repeat of the standoffs in Ipperwash or Caledonia, where native land claims disputes have led to violence, and the killing of native protester Dudley George. However, many of the tribe are also hopeful; Algonquin protests have yielded successful results in the past. The Ranger Uranium Mine in Australia. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Canadian Forces Camp Ipperwash existed from 1942 until 1995. ... Caledonia is the Latin name given by the Roman Empire to a northern area of the island of Great Britain. ... Anthony OBrien Dudley George (March 17, 1957 – September 7, 1995) was a Ojibwa protestor who was shot and killed near Ipperwash Provincial Park in Ontario in 1995 during the Ipperwash Crisis. ...


Algonkin communities

At the time of their first meeting with the French in 1603, the various Algonquin bands probably had a combined population somewhere in the neighborhood of 6,000. The British estimate in 1768 was 1,500. Currently, there are almost 8,000 Algonquins in Canada organized into ten separate First Nations: nine in Quebec and one in Ontario.


Historical Algonquin Communities

Algonquian Nations documented as early as 1630:

  • "Iroquet" — They were known as Hiroquet, Hirocay, Iroquay, Yroquetto, and to the Huron as the Atonontrataronon or Ononchataronon; they lived along Ontario's South Nation River.
  • Kitcisìpiriniwak ("people of the great river") — They were the largest and most powerful group of Algonquins. Known variously as: Algoumequins de l'Isle, Allumette, Big River People, Gens d l'Isle, Honkeronon (Wyandot language), Island Algonquian, Island Indians, Island Nation, People from the Island, Kichesippiriniwek, Nation de l'Isle, Nation of the Isle, and Savages de l'Isle. Their main village was on Morrison Island.
  • Kinònjepìriniwak ("people of the Pickerel-waters") — Also known as Keinouche, Kinonche, Pickerel, Pike and Quenongebin. Sometimes they were listed as an Algonquian band, but after 1650 associated with the Ottawa. Originally found along the lower Ottawa River below Allumette Island.
  • Matàwackariniwak "people of the bulrushed-shore" — Also known as Madawaska, Madwaska, Matouchkarine, Matouashita, Mataouchkarini, Matouechkariniwek and Matouescarini; the Madawaska River in the Upper Ottawa Valley is named after this Band.
  • "Nibachis" — Located at Muskrat Lake near present-day Cobden, Ontario.
  • "Otaguottaouemin" — Also known as Kotakoutouemi or Outaoukotwemiwek. They were located along the Upper Ottawa River above Allumette Island.
  • Sàgaiganininiwak ("people of the lake") — Also known as Saghiganirini.
  • "Saginitaouigama" — Also known as Sagachiganiriniwek.
  • Wàwàckeciriniwak ("people of the deer[-clan]") — Also known as the Algonquian Proper, Weskarini, La Petite Nation, Little Nation, Ouaouechkairini, Ouassouarini, Ouescharini, Ouionontateronon (Wyandot language), or Petite Nation. They were located on the north side of the BIG Ottawa River along the Lievre and the Rouge Rivers in Quebec.

The Kichesipirini (also spelled Kichesippirini; literally People of the Great River) are an indigenous people of Canada. ... Wyandot is the Iroquoian language traditionally spoken by the people known variously as Wyandot, Wendat, or Huron. ... Year 1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the Madawaska River in Ontario. ... The Ottawa Valley is the valley surrounding the Ottawa River for the west-east portion of its path through the Canadian Shield from Mattawa to Ottawa. ... Muskrat Lake is located in the Whitewater Region of Renfrew County, Ontario, Canada. ... Cobden is a small village in the Whitewater Region, Ontario. ... Wyandot is the Iroquoian language traditionally spoken by the people known variously as Wyandot, Wendat, or Huron. ...

Contemporary Algonquin Communities

Algonquin communities since 1800s. Status Nations are listed from greatest to least in population.

  • Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, Kitigan Zibi QC (population 2,600
  • Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation, Golden Lake ON (population 1,871)
  • Timiskaming First Nation, Notre-Dame-du-Nord QC (population 1,553)
  • Nation Anishinabe du Lac Simon, Lac Simon QC (population 1,459)
  • Abitibiwinni First Nation, Pikogan QC (population 814)
  • Eagle Village First Nation, Témiscaming QC (population 676)
  • Long Point First Nation, Winneway River QC (population 652)
  • Algonquins of Barrière Lake, Lac Rapide QC (population 616)
  • Anicinape Community of Kitcisakik, Val d'Or QC (population 384)
  • Wolf Lake First Nation, Témiscaming QC (population 262)
  • Wahgoshig First Nation, Matheson ON (population 250)
  • Ardoch Algonguin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Big Rideau Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Bob’s Lake Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Calabogie Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Eagle Lake Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Eel Lake Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Fall River Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Golden Lake Algonquin First Nation, (historical)
      • Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation, (status - see above)
      • Bonnechere Algonquin Community, (non-status)
    • Mattawachen Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Ottawa Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
    • Sharbot Lake Algonquin First Nation, (von-status)
    • Tay River Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
  • Kichesipirini Algonquin First Nation, (non-status)
  • Dumoine Lake Band of Algonquin, (historical)
  • Grassy Lake Band of Algonquin, (historical)
  • Lac des Quinze Band of Algonquin, (historical)
  • Temagami Lake Band of Algonquin, (historical)
  • Washagami Lake Band of Algonquin, (historical)

These population figures are from Canada's Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. The Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation are an Algonquin First Nation in Ontario, Canada. ... Témiscaming is a town located at the south end of Lake Temiscaming on the upper Ottawa River in the Témiscamingue Regional County Municipality of western Quebec. ... Val-dOr (2001 population: 32,125) is a city in Quebec, Canada. ... Témiscaming is a town located at the south end of Lake Temiscaming on the upper Ottawa River in the Témiscamingue Regional County Municipality of western Quebec. ... Abitibi 70 (2006 population 114) ,also known as Wahgoshig or just Abitibi, is an indian reserve on Lake Abitibi in northeastern Ontario, Canada. ...


The Nipissing First Nation of North Bay, Ontario is also sometimes considered to belong to the Algonkin group of Anishinaabeg. The Nipissing First Nation consists of first nation (i. ... North Bay ( , time zone EST) is a city in Northeastern Ontario, Canada (2006 population 53,966). ... Anishinaabe or more properly Anishinaabeg or Anishinabek (which is the plural form of the word) is a self-description often used by the Odawa, Ojibwe, and Algonkin peoples, who all speak closely related Anishinaabemowin/Anishinaabe languages. ...


See also

The Great Trail system was the network of footpaths created by Algonquian and Iroquoian-speaking peoples prior to the arrival of European colonists in North America. ... The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers, critics, actors and wits that met from 1919 until about 1929, though its legacy endured long afterward. ... The mythology of the Algonquin, an aboriginal North American people of the region of Montreal and Quebec contains the following gods and spirits: // Kitchi Manitou is the father of life, The Great Spirit, the Supreme Being Earth-Mother, aka Nokomis - Algonquin legend says that [b]eneath the clouds [lives] the... The name Kingdom of Saguenay (French: Royaume du Saguenay) has its origin in an Algonquin legend learned by the French during French colonisation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. ... Principal Chief or Ogimà is the title of the chief executive of each Algonquin community. ...

References

  1. ^ Campbell (1997:401 n. 133, 136)
  2. ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Place Names of the United States. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, pg. 32
  3. ^ Artuso, Christian. 1998. noogom gaa-izhi-anishinaabemonaaniwag: Generational Difference in Algonquin. Winnipeg: The University of Manitoba Press.
  4. ^ Cuoq, Jean André. 1886. Lexique de la Langue Algonquine. Montréal: J. Chapleau & Fils.
  5. ^ http://www.aafna.ca/history.html
  6. ^ http://www.aafna.ca/protest_update.html

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Algonquin Hotel | Official Site | Time Square Hotels (168 words)
An oasis of calm amid the hustle and bustle of New York City, the Algonquin Hotel is steeped in historic tradition and surrounded by modern significance.
Since 1902 the Algonquin Hotel has played host to literary giants and international luminaries, building a reputation as the leading choice amongst New York City hotels through personalized service and unique amenities.
Generations have enjoyed an adventure through the Algonquin's legendary lobby, beginning their journey with tea in the fabled Round Table Room, world-class entertainment in the famed Oak Room or a cocktail in the Blue Bar.
Algonquin (90 words)
The essence of Algonquin is in its vast interior of maple hills, rocky ridges, and thousands of lakes.
The only way to explore the interior of this park is by canoe or on foot.
There is also a second Algonquin – along the 56-kilometre stretch of Highway 60.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m