FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Alfred Waterhouse
The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture.
The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture.

Alfred Waterhouse (July 19, 1830 - August 22, 1905) was an English architect, particularly associated with the Victorian Gothic revival. He is perhaps best known for his design for the Natural History Museum in London, although he also built a wide variety of other buildings throughout the country. Financially speaking, Waterhouse was probably the most successful of all Victorian architects. Though expert within Gothic and Renaissance styles, Waterhouse never limited himself to a single architectural style. Download high resolution version (711x1041, 390 KB)Photographer:Thorfinn Stainforth (c)2001; taken in July 2001, London, UK; British Natural History Museum; File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (711x1041, 390 KB)Photographer:Thorfinn Stainforth (c)2001; taken in July 2001, London, UK; British Natural History Museum; File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles during the Victorian era: Neoclassicism Gothic Revival Italianate Second Empire Neo-Grec Romanesque Revival (Includes Richardsonian Revival) Renaissance Revival Queen Anne Jacobethan architecture (the precusor to the Queen Anne style) British Arts and Crafts movement painted... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect, also known as a building designer, is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction, whose role is to guide decisions affecting those building aspects that are of aesthetic, cultural or social concern. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ... St. ... By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance *French Renaissance *German Renaissance *English Renaissance Tempietto, San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502 designed by Donato Bramante. ...

Contents


Early life

Waterhouse was born on the 19th July 1830 in Liverpool, the son of wealthy mill-owning Quaker parents. He was educated at the Quaker run Grove School in Tottenham near London. He studied architecture under Richard Lane in Manchester, and spent much of his youth travelling in Europe and studying in France, Italy and Germany. Upon his return to England, Alfred set up his own architectural practice in Manchester. July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough on Merseyside in north west England, on the north side of the Mersey estuary. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Tottenham is an area in North London, England. ... St. ... Manchester is a city in the north-west of England. ... A satellite composite image of Europe World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ...


Waterhouse continued to practice in Manchester for 12 years, until moving his practice to London in 1865. Waterhouse's earliest commissions were for domestic buildings, but his success as a designer of public buildings was assured in 1859 when he won the open competition for the Manchester Assize Courts. This work not only showed his ability to plan a complicated building on a large scale, but also marked him out as a champion of the Gothic cause. 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The Manchester assize courts were law courts once located in Strangeways, Manchester in England. ... Notre-Dame Cathedral seen from the River Seine. ...


London practice

In 1865 Waterhouse was one of the architects selected to compete for the Royal Courts of Justice. The new University Club was undertaken in 1866. In 1868 and nine years after his work on the Manchester Assize Courts, another competition secured for Waterhouse the design of Manchester Town Hall, where he was able to show a firmer and more original handling of the Gothic style. The same year he was involved in rebuilding part of Caius College, Cambridge; this was not his first university work, for he had already worked on Balliol College, Oxford in 1867, and the new buildings of the Cambridge Union Society, in 1866. 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The main entrance The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a building in London, which houses the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Manchester Town Hall Manchester Town Hall is a building in Manchester, England that houses the citys government and administrative functions. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto - Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Graduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally known as Caius (though pronounced... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Triona Giblin Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Cambridge Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Cambridge Union, is one of the largest student societies at the University of Cambridge and one of the oldest in the world. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ...


At Caius, out of deference to the Renaissance treatment of the older parts of the college, ths Gothic element was intentionally mingled with classic detail, while Balliol and Pembroke College, Cambridge, which followed in 1871, are typical of the style of his mid career with Gothic tradition tempered by individual taste and by adaptation to modern needs. Girton College, Cambridge, a building of simpler type, dates originally from the same period (1870), but has been periodically enlarged by further buildings. Two important domestic works were undertaken in 1870 and 1871 respectively -- Eaton Hall in Cheshire for the Duke of Westminster, and Heythrop Hall, Oxfordshire, the latter a restoration of a fairly strict classic type. By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance *French Renaissance *German Renaissance *English Renaissance Tempietto, San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502 designed by Donato Bramante. ... Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Pembroke Street Undergraduates ~420 Graduates 194 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a college... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Full name Girton College Motto - Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College Somerville College Mistress Dame Marylin Strathern Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 503 Graduates 201 Homepage Boatclub Girton College lies on the extremity of Cambridge Girton College was established... The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This 1826 print shows the entrance front of William Pordens Eaton Hall. ... This article is about the English county. ... The title of Duke of Westminster was created by Queen Victoria in 1874 and bestowed upon Richard Grosvenor, the 3rd Marquess of Westminster. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Latin Oxonia) is a county in South East England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Warwickshire. ...


Waterhouse received, without competition, the commission to build the Natural History Museum in South Kensington (1873 - 1881), a design which marks an epoch in the modern use of terracotta and which was to become his best known work. Waterhouse's other works in London included the National Liberal Club (a study in Renaissance composition), University College Hospital, the Surveyors' Institution in London's Great George Street (1896), and the Jenner Institute of Preventive Medicine in Chelsea (1895). The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ... South Kensington is an area in West London - it straddles the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and the City of Westminster. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... The National Liberal Club is a London gentlemens club, now also open to women, which was established by William Ewart Gladstone in 1882 for the purpose of providing club facilities for Liberal Party campaigners among the newly-enlarged electorate after the 1882 Reform Act. ... Categories: Stub | London hospitals ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Chelsea is a district of London, loosely defined by the area around the Kings Road, beginning at Sloane Square at one end, and the Worlds End public house at the other, the River Thames and the Victorian artists district to the south, and some parts between the King... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


From the late 1860s, Waterhouse lived in the Reading area and was responsible for several significant buildings there. These included his own residences of Foxhill House (1868) and Yattendon Court (1877), together with Reading Town Hall (1875) and Reading School (1870). Foxhill House is still in use by the University of Reading, as are his Whiteknights House (built for his father) and East Thorpe House (built in 1880 for Alfred Palmer). Events and trends Italian unification under King Victor Emmanuel II. Wars for expansion and national unity continue until the incorporation of the Papal States (March 17, 1861 - September 20, 1870). ... St Marys Church and market Reading is a town and unitary authority in Berkshire in England, at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, halfway between London and Oxford. ... Foxhill House is a Gothic revival style building at grid reference SU736723 on the Whiteknights campus of the University of Reading in the English town of Reading. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Museum of Reading is located in the old Town Hall in Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Reading School is a grammar school in the town of Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Reading (pronounced Redding) is a university in the English town of Reading. ... The Museum of English Rural Life was founded by the University of Reading in 1951 to record the changing face of farming and the countryside. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Holborn Bars

For the Prudential Assurance Company, Waterhouse designed many offices, including their Holborn Bars head office in Holborn and branch offices in Southampton and Leeds. He also designed offices for the National Provincial Bank in Piccadilly (1892) and in Manchester. The Liverpool Infirmary was Waterhouse's largest hospital; and St. Mary's Hospital in Manchester, the Alexandra Hospital in Rhyl, and extensive additions at the Nottingham General Hospital, also involved him. He was involved in a series of works for the Victoria University, of which he was made LL.D. in 1895. Other educational buildings designed by Waterhouse include Yorkshire College, Leeds (1878), Liverpool University College (1885), St Paul's School in Hammersmith (1881); and the Central Technical College in London's Exhibition Road (1881). Among works not already mentioned are Salford Prison, St Margaret's School in Bushey, the Metropole Hotel in Brighton, Hove Town Hall; Alloa Town Hall; St. Elisabeth's church in Reddish; the Oxford Union buildings; Darlington town clock and market hall; the Weigh House chapel in Mayfair, and Hutton Hall in Yorkshire. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1856 KB) Photography taken by User:MarkS 14 June 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1856 KB) Photography taken by User:MarkS 14 June 2004. ... This article refers to Prudential plc, based in the United Kingdom. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... Civic Centre, Southampton Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... Leeds Coat Of Arms Map sources for Leeds at grid reference SE297338 Leeds is a city in the county of West Yorkshire, in the north of England. ... Old NatWest logo NatWest (formerly the National Westminster Bank) is the United Kingdoms third biggest bank. ... Piccadilly is a major London street, running from Hyde Park Corner in the west to Piccadilly Circus in the east. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Liverpool Infirmary was founded in 1749 and opened by the Earl of Derby on March 25, 1749. ... Rhyl (Welsh: Y Rhyl) is a seaside town located on the Irish Sea, in the administrative county of Denbighshire and the traditional county of Flintshire, North Wales, United Kingdom, at the mouth of the River Clwyd (Welsh: Yr Afon Clwyd). ... The Victoria University of Manchester (almost always referred to as simply the University of Manchester) was a university in Manchester in England. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Parkinson Building, University of Leeds The University of Leeds (United Kingdom) is amongst the largest of British universities and the most popular by applicants, with 52,444 applicants in 2003 for 7,228 places (UCAS). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool in the United Kingdom. ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... St Pauls School is a British public school, located in Barnes, London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, England. ... Hammersmith is a town in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in west London. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The City and Guilds of London Institute was founded by the London Livery Companies for the purpose of training craftsmen and engineers in 1878. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... HM Prison Manchester is a British prison. ... Map sources for Bushey at grid reference TQ132952 Bushey (population 24,000) is a town in the Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire in the East of England. ... Brighton on the southern Sussex coast is one of the largest and most famous seaside resorts in England. ... Reddish is an area of Stockport, Greater Manchester in the United Kingdom. ... Oxford Union Societys Victorian (new) debating chamber Oxford Union The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society whose membership is drawn primarily from the University of Oxford. ... Mayfair is an area in the City of Westminster London, named after the fortnight-long May Fair that took place there from 1686 until it was banned in that location in 1764. ... Yorkshire as a traditional county. ...


Recognition

Waterhouse became a fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1861, and was President from 1888 to 1891. He obtained a grand prix for architecture at the Paris Exposition of 1867, and a "Rappel" in 1878. In the same year he received the Royal gold medal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and was made an associate of the Royal Academy, of which body he became a full member in 1885 and treasurer in 1898. He was also a member of the academies of Vienna (1869), Brussels (1886), Antwerp (1887), Milan (1888) and Berlin (1889), and a corresponding member of the Institut de France (1893). After 1886 he was constantly called upon to act as assessor in architectural competitions, and was a member of the international jury appointed to adjudicate on the designs for the west front of Milan Cathedral in 1887. In 1890 he served as architectural member of the Royal Commission on the proposed enlargement of Westminster Abbey as a place of burial. The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects in the United Kingdom. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article refers to an art institution in London. ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Hungarian: Bécs) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the headquarters of the European Union, as two of its four main institutions have their headquarters in the... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 9 - The United States of America is 40,000 days old. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Location within Italy Piazza della Scala Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed Italian region. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Institut de France (French Institute) is a French learned society, grouping five académies, the most famous of which is probably the Académie française. ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 9 - The United States of America is 40,000 days old. ... The Duomo di Milano is one of the most famous buildings in Europe. ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Westminster Abbeys western facade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Later life

Waterhouse retired from architecture in 1902, having practiced in partnership with his son, Paul Waterhouse, from 1891. He died at Yattendon Court on the 22nd August 1905. 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


References

  • This entry incorporates public domain text originally from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica.
  • David Nash Ford (2003). Royal Berkshire History - Alfred Waterhouse (1830-1905). Retrieved June 29, 2005.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alfred Waterhouse - definition of Alfred Waterhouse in Encyclopedia (739 words)
Alfred Waterhouse (July 19, 1830 - August 22, 1905) was an English architect, particularly associated with the Victorian Gothic revival.
In 1865 Waterhouse had removed his practice from Manchester to London, and he was one of the architects selected to compete for the Royal Courts of Justice.
Waterhouse became a fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1861, and was President from 1888 to 1891.
Encyclopedia: Alfred Waterhouse (3504 words)
Waterhouse was born on the 19th July 1830 in Liverpool, the son of wealthy mill-owning Quaker parents.
Waterhouse's earliest commissions were for domestic buildings, but his success as a designer of public buildings was assured in 1859 when he won the open competition for the Manchester Assize Courts.
Waterhouse received, without competition, the commission to build the Natural History Museum in South Kensington (1873 - 1881), a design which marks an epoch in the modern use of terracotta and which was to become his best known work.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m