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Encyclopedia > Alfons Maria Jakob

Alfons Maria Jakob (born July 2, 1884, Aschaffenburg/Bavaria; died October 17, 1931, Hamburg) was a German neurologist with important contributions on neuropathology. July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Aschaffenburg is a city in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Alster Lake at dusk Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany and with the Hamburg Harbour, its principal port. ... Neurology is the branch of medicine that deals with the nervous system and disorders affecting it. ... Neuropathology is the study of diseases of the nervous system, and is a medical subspecialty within the specialty of anatomical pathology, itself a division within pathology in many English speaking countries. ...


Alfons Maria Jakob was the son of a shopkeeper. He studied medicine in Munich, Berlin, and Strassburg, where obtained his doctorate in 1908. In 1909 he commenced clinical work under the psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin and did laboratory work with Franz Nissl and Alois Alzheimer in Munich. Medicine is the branch of health science and the sector of public life concerned with maintaining human health or restoring it through the treatment of disease and injury. ... Munich and the Bavarian Alps Munich (German: München, (pronounced listen) is the largest city and capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria. ... (help· info), IPA: , is the capital city as well as a state of Germany, and also the countrys largest city. ... Strasbourg townscape Strasbourg (German Straßburg, road to castle, Alsatian Strossburi) is the capital and principal city of the Alsace région of northeastern France. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Psychiatry is the branch of medicine that studies, diagnoses and treats mental illness and behavioral disorders. ... Emil Kraepelin (February 15, 1856- October 7, 1926) was a German Psychiatrist who attempted to create a synthesis of the hundreds of mental disorders classified by the 19th century, grouping diseases together based on classification of common patterns of symptoms, rather than by simple similarity of major symptoms in the... Franz Nissl Franz Nissl (1860-1919) was born in Frankenthal in the Bavarian Palatinate, the son of Theodor Nissl and Maria Haas. ... Alois Alzheimer Alois Alzheimer (Alois is a short form for his given name Aloysius) (June 14, 1864 - December 19, 1915), a German psychiatrist and neuropathologist, was a colleague of Emil Kraepelin, who first identified the symptoms of what is now known as Alzheimers Disease. ... Munich and the Bavarian Alps Munich (German: München, (pronounced listen) is the largest city and capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria. ...


In 1911 he went to Hamburg to work with Theodor Kaes and became head of the laboratory of anatomical pathology at the psychiatric State Hospital Hamburg-Friedrichsberg. Following the death of Kaes in 1913, Jakob succeded him as prosector. After serving in the German army in World War I, he returned to Hamburg and climbed the academic ladder. He was habilitated in neurology in 1919 and in 1924 became professor of neurology. Under Jakob's guidance the department grew rapidly. He made notable contributions to knowledge on concussion and secondary nerve degeneration and became a doyen of neuropathology. 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Alster Lake at dusk Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany and with the Hamburg Harbour, its principal port. ... Anatomical pathology is the branch of pathology that is concerned with the diagnosis of disease based on the gross and microscopic examination of cells and tissues. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Prosector and physician in a dissection. ... Combatants Allies: • Serbia, • Russia, • France, • Romania, • Belgium, • British Empire and Dominions, • United States, • Italy, • ...and others Central Powers: • Germany, • Austria-Hungary, • Ottoman Empire, • Bulgaria Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total: 8 million Full list Military dead: 3 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total: 6 million Full... Neurology is a branch of medicine dealing with the nervous system and its disorders. ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Neuropathology is the study of diseases of the nervous system, and is a medical subspecialty within the specialty of anatomical pathology, itself a division within pathology in many English speaking countries. ...


Jakob published five monographs and more than 75 papers. His neuropathological studies contributed greatly to the delineation of several diseases, including multiple sclerosis and Friedreich's ataxia. He first recognised and described Alper's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (the latter with Hans Gerhard Creutzfeldt). He accumulated immense experience in neurosyphilis, having a 200-bedded ward devoted exclusively to that disorder. Jakob made a lecture tour of the U.S.A. and South-America where he wrote a paper on the neuropathology of yellow fever. Friedreichs ataxia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in Gene X25 that codes for frataxin, located on chromosome 9. ... Alpers disease, also called progressive infantile poliodystrophy, is a progressive degenerative disease of the central nervous system that occurs in infants and children. ... Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a very rare and incurable brain disease that is ultimately fatal. ... Hans Gerhard Creutzfeldt (June 2, 1885 - December 30, 1964) was a German neuropathologist. ... need information on neurosyphillis infection This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... World map showing South America A satellite composite image of South America South America is a continent situated in the Western Hemisphere between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. ...


He suffered from chronic osteomyelitis for the last 7 years of his life. This eventually caused a retroperitoneal abscess and paralytic ileus from which he died following operation. Osteomyelitis is an infection of bone, usually caused by pyogenic bacteria or mycobacteria. ... Abscess An abscess is a collection of pus collected in a cavity formed by the tissue on the basis of an infectious process (usually caused by bacteria or parasites) or other foreign materials (e. ... Paralysis is the complete loss of muscle function for one or more muscle groups. ... Intestinal obstruction can be partial or complete blockage of the intestine, either large or small. ...


Associated eponym

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a very rare and incurable brain disease that is ultimately fatal. ... Neither this nor any other article from the Wikimedia Foundation should be construed as an attempt to offer or render a medical opinion or otherwise engage in the practice of medicine. ... For the bird called a prion, see Prion (bird) Prions - short for proteinaceous infectious particle - are infectious self-reproducing protein structures. ...

Bbliography

  • Die extrapyramidalen Erkrankungen. In: Monographien aus dem Gesamtgebiete der Neurologie und Psychiatry, Berlin, 1923
  • Normale und pathologische Anatomie und Histologie des Grosshirns. Separate printing of Handbuch der Psychiatry. Leipzig, 1927-1928
  • Das Kleinhirn. In: Handbuch der mikroskopischen Anatomie, Berlin, 1928
  • Die Syphilis des Gehirns und seiner Häute. In: Oswald Bumke (edit.): Hanbuch der Geisteskrankheiten, Berlin, 1930

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alfons Maria Jakob - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (350 words)
Alfons Maria Jakob (born July 2, 1884, Aschaffenburg/Bavaria; died October 17, 1931, Hamburg) was a German neurologist with important contributions on neuropathology.
Alfons Maria Jakob was the son of a shopkeeper.
Jakob made a lecture tour of the U.S.A. and South-America where he wrote a paper on the neuropathology of yellow fever.
Jakob - IIES ~ Jakob Svensson's Homepage (403 words)
Jakob the band : To listen to Jakob is to journey through the harsh, beautiful, isolated landscape of the Hawkes Bay, NZ, that is their home.
Alfons Maria Jakob: German neurologist, born July 2, 1884, Ashaffenburg-au-Mair, Bavaria; died oktober 17, 1931, Hamburg.
Clips jakob digs expand (when viewing a clip, click the 'dig it' link!) jakob said yesterday dobbsie: not exactly, but it was along the same lines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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