FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Alexandria, Virginia
Alexandria, Virginia
Official seal of Alexandria, Virginia
Seal
Location in Virginia
Location in Virginia
Coordinates: 38°48′17″N 77°2′50″W / 38.80472, -77.04722
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded 1749
Government
 - Mayor William D. Euille
Area
 - Total 15.4 sq mi (39.9 km²)
 - Land 15.2 sq mi (39.3 km²)
 - Water 0.2 sq mi (0.6 km²)
Elevation 39 ft (12 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 128,283
 - Density 8,452.0/sq mi (3,262.9/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 571, 703
FIPS code 51-01000[1]
GNIS feature ID 1492456[2]
Website: www.alexandriava.gov

Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 128,284. Located along the Western bank of the Potomac River, Alexandria is approximately 6 miles (9.6 kilometers) south of downtown Washington, D.C. Image File history File links Alexandria_VA_seal. ... Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Eastern Standard Time redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The area colored red indicates the northern region of Virginia served by overlay area code 571 and original area code 703 Telephone area code 571 is an overlay area code that is coextensive with area code 703 in Northern Virginia. ... The area colored red indicates the geographical region of Northern Virginia served by area code 703 Area code 703 currently serves most land-line telephone installations in Northern Virginia, including the cities of Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church and Manassas, as well as the counties of Arlington, Fairfax, parts of Fauquier... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Like the rest of Northern Virginia, as well as central Maryland, modern Alexandria has been shaped by its proximity to the nation's capital. It is largely populated by professionals working in the federal civil service, the U.S. military, or for one of the many private companies which contract to provide services to the federal government. The latter are known locally as beltway bandits, after the Capital Beltway, an interstate highway that circles Washington, D.C. One of Alexandria's largest employers is the U.S. Department of Defense. Others include the Institute for Defense Analyses and the Center for Naval Analyses. In 2005, the United States Patent and Trademark Office moved 7,100 employees from 18 separate buildings in nearby Crystal City into a new headquarters complex in the city. Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Beltway bandit is a term for private companies located near Washington, D.C. whose major business is to provide goods and services to the US government. ... The Capital Beltway (in green) The Capital Beltway (Interstate 495) is an expressway-class interstate highway which circles the Washington, DC area. ... Department of Defense redirects here. ... The Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) is a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) focusing on defense issues. ... The Center for Naval Analyses is a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) for the Department of the U.S. Navy. ... PTO headquarters in Alexandria The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ... Satellite image of the interlocking highrises of Crystal City. ...


Alexandria is home to numerous associations, charities, and non-profit organizations including the national headquarters of groups such as the Salvation Army. In 2005, Alexandria became one of the first cities of its size to offer free wireless internet access to some of its residents and visitors. Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ...


The historic center of Alexandria is known as Old Town. It is a major draw for tourists and those seeking nightlife. Like Old Town, many Alexandria neighborhoods are high-income suburbs of Washington D.C.


It is the seventh largest and highest income independent city in Virginia. A 2005 assessed-value study of homes and condominiums found that over 40 percent were in the highest bracket, worth $556,000 or more.

Contents

History

Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians (1814) by William Charles mocked Alexandria citizens (kneeling at left, with hair standing on end) for not putting up more resistance to the British.
Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians (1814) by William Charles mocked Alexandria citizens (kneeling at left, with hair standing on end) for not putting up more resistance to the British.
Map of Alexandria County (1878), including what is now Arlington County and the City of Alexandria. Map includes the names of property owners at that time. City boundaries roughly correspond with Old Town.
Map of Alexandria County (1878), including what is now Arlington County and the City of Alexandria. Map includes the names of property owners at that time. City boundaries roughly correspond with Old Town.
U.S. Geological Survey Map of Alexandria County (1894), including what is now Arlington County and the City of Alexandria. Map also shows the western portion of the District of Columbia and some portions of Montgomery County (Maryland), Prince George's County (Maryland) and Fairfax County (Virginia.)
U.S. Geological Survey Map of the "Alexandria Quadrangle" (1945), including what is now the City of Alexandria and surrouding areas. At this time, the City of Alexandria is bounded on the west by Seminary and Quaker Roads, on the north by Four Mile Run and on the south by Little River Turnpike/Duke Street and Hunting Creek.
U.S. postage stamp honoring Alexandria's bicentennial in 1949
U.S. postage stamp honoring Alexandria's bicentennial in 1949
Old Town Alexandria, viewed from the west, as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. King Street Station is in the foreground and the Potomac River is in the background
Old Town Alexandria, viewed from the west, as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. King Street Station is in the foreground and the Potomac River is in the background

The first settlement was established in 1695 in what was then the British Colony of Virginia. Around 1746, Captain Philip Alexander II (1704-1753) moved to what is south of present Duke Street in Alexandria. His estate, which consisted of 500 acres (2 km²), was bounded by Hunting Creek, Hooff’s Run, the Potomac River, and approximately the line of which would become Cameron Street. Since it was felt that the Potomac River was a good place for a prosperous town, there was a petition submitted to the Virginia legislature on November 1, 1748, that the "inhabitants of Fairfax (Co.) praying that a town may be established at Hunting Creek Warehouse on Potowmack River," as Hugh West was the owner of the warehouse. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x857, 246 KB) JOHNNY BULL and the ALEXANDRIANS (1814) By William Charles Engraving Political cartoon Source: Harpweek: http://loc. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x857, 246 KB) JOHNNY BULL and the ALEXANDRIANS (1814) By William Charles Engraving Political cartoon Source: Harpweek: http://loc. ... Bruin become Mediator or Negotiation for Peace c. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (7504 × 4896 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (7504 × 4896 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 377 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (694 × 1102 pixel, file size: 398 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Washington, D.C. - Western Section with Alexandria, Virginia 1894 U.S. Geological Survey (417K) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 377 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (694 × 1102 pixel, file size: 398 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Washington, D.C. - Western Section with Alexandria, Virginia 1894 U.S. Geological Survey (417K) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (4144 × 5229 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (4144 × 5229 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links USPostageStampAlexandriaVirginia. ... Image File history File links USPostageStampAlexandriaVirginia. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1025 KB) The Old Town district of Alexandria, Virginia as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1025 KB) The Old Town district of Alexandria, Virginia as seen from the observation deck of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ... George Washington Masonic National Memorial George Washington Masonic National Memorial is a masonic lodge and memorial dedicated to the memory of George Washington, the first president of the United States of America and a Mason. ... King Street station entrance pylon. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... A map of the Colony of Virginia. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1748 (MDCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Since this was amidst his estate, Philip opposed the idea and strongly favored a site at the head of Great Hunting Creek. It has been said that in order to avoid a predicament the petitioners changed the name of the new town from Belle Haven to Alexandria, in honor of Philip’s family. As a result, Philip and his cousin Captain John Alexander (1711-1763) gave land to assist in the development of Alexandria, and are thus listed as the founders. This John was the son of Robert Alexander II (1688-1735). Lots were being sold for the town of Alexandria by July 1749, though it did not become incorporated until 1779. John Alexander may refer to: John Alexander VC (d. ...


In 1755, General Edward Braddock organized his fatal expedition against Fort Duquesne at Carlyle House in Alexandria. In April of 1755, the governors of Virginia, and the Provinces of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and New York met to determine upon concerted action against the French in America. General Edward Braddock General Edward Braddock (1695? – July 13, 1755) was a British soldier and commander-in-chief for North America during the actions at the start of the French and Indian War. ... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ... Carlyle House was built in Alexandria, Virginia, by one of the largest slaveholders in northern Virginia, John Carlyle, in 1752. ... A map of the Province of Maryland. ... A map of the Province of Pennsylvania. ... A map of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. ... A map of the Province of New York. ...


In March 1785, commissioners from Virginia and Maryland met in Alexandria to discuss the commercial relations of the two states, finishing their business at Mount Vernon. The Mount Vernon Conference concluded on March 28 with an agreement for freedom of trade and freedom of navigation of the Potomac River. The Maryland legislature, in ratifying this agreement on November 22, proposed a conference among representatives from all the states to consider the adoption of definite commercial regulations. This led to the calling of the Annapolis Convention of 1786, which in turn led to the calling of the Federal Convention of 1787. Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. ... The Mount Vernon Conference was a meeting of delegates from Virginia and Maryland at George Washingtons home at Mount Vernon, Virginia in March 1785. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1791, Alexandria was included in the area chosen by George Washington to become the District of Columbia. A portion of the City of Alexandria---namely known as "Old Town"--- and all of today's Arlington County share the distinction of having been originally in Virginia, ceded to the U.S. Government to form the District of Columbia, and later retroceded to Virginia by the federal government in 1846, when the District was reduced in size to exclude the portion south of the Potomac River. The City of Alexandria was re-chartered in 1852. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The District of Columbia, the national capital of the United States, was formed in 1790 from 100 square miles (260 km²) that were ceded to the federal government by the states of Maryland and Virginia. ...


During the War of 1812, Alexandria surrendered to a British fleet in 1814 without a fight. As agreed in the terms of surrender the British looted stores and warehouses of mainly flour, tobacco, cotton, wine, and sugar.[3] This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ...


From 1828 to 1836,[4] Alexandria was home to the Franklin & Armfield Slave Market, one of the largest slave trading companies in the country. By the 1830s, they were sending more than 1,000 slaves annually from Alexandria to their Natchez, Mississippi, and New Orleans markets to help meet the demand for slaves in Mississippi and surrounding states.[5] Later owned by Price, Birch & Co., the slave pen became a jail under Union occupation.[6] Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union...


The City of Alexandria became independent of Alexandria County in 1870. The remaining portion of Alexandria County changed its name to Arlington County in 1920, which ended years of confusion. Alexandria County was part of the original 10-mile square created as the District of Columbia in 1791 pursuant to Article I, Section 17, of the United States Constitution. ...


Return to Virginia

Over time, a movement grew to separate Alexandria from the District of Columbia. As competition grew with the port of Georgetown and the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal fostered development on the north side of the Potomac River, the city's economy stagnated. In addition, many in Alexandria hoped to benefit from land sales and increased business from the federal government, which had no need for the land south of the river at the time. Also, its residents had lost representation and the right to vote at any level of government. The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ... Canal at Swains Lock Chesapeake and Ohio Canal map The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, abbreviated as the C&O Canal, and occasionally referred to as the Grand Old Ditch, operated from 1836 until 1924 parallel to the Potomac River in Maryland from Cumberland, Maryland to Washington, DC. The total...


Alexandria was also an important port and market in the slave trade, and there were increasing talk of the abolition of slavery in the national capital. Alexandria's economy would suffer greatly if slavery were outlawed. At the same time, there was an active abolition movement in Virginia, and the state's General Assembly was closely divided on the question of slavery (resulting in the formation of West Virginia some years later by the most anti-slavery counties). Alexandria and Alexandria County would provide two new pro-slavery representatives. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Abolition is the act of formally destroying something through legal means, either by making it illegal, or simply no longer allowing it to exist in any form. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Alexandria County was part of the original 10-mile square created as the District of Columbia in 1791 pursuant to Article I, Section 17, of the United States Constitution. ...


After a referendum, voters petitioned Congress and Virginia to return the area to Virginia. The area was retroceded to Virginia on July 9, 1846.[7] is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


American Civil War

At the opening of the American Civil War, the city was occupied by Federal troops until the end of the war, making it the longest held city during the war. Fort Ward, built for the defense of Washington, DC, was located within the boundaries of modern Alexandria.[8] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Fort Ward is a former Union Army installation now located in the city of Alexandria in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


Great excitement throughout the North was caused by the killing of Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth on May 24, 1861, by Captain James W. Jackson, a hotel proprietor, from whose building Ellsworth had removed a Confederate flag. After the establishment of the state of West Virginia in 1863 and until the close of the war, Alexandria was the seat of the Restored Government of Virginia also known as the "Alexandria Government." Also, buildings at Virginia Theological Seminary and at Episcopal High School served as hospitals for union troops. Bullets, belt clips, and other artifacts from the civil war have been found in the area well into the 20th century. Elmer Ephriam Ellsworth (E.E. Ellsworth) (1837-1861) was known as the first conspicuous casualty of the Civil War. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The following are the flags used by the short-lived Confederate States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Aspinwall Hall, dedicated 1859 Virginia Theological Seminary (VTS), formally called the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia,[1] is the largest accredited Episcopal seminary in the United States. ... Aerial photograph of Episcopal High School. ...


20th century

In 1930, Alexandria annexed the Town of Potomac. That town, adjacent to Potomac Yard, had been laid out beginning in the late 19th century and incorporated in 1908. Pope John Paul II visited Alexandria when he was known as Cardinal Karol Wojtyla. He was guided by a Polish Catholic priest from St. Mary's Catholic Church in Alexandria. This was in 1969 and 1976. In 1999 the city celebrated its 250th anniversary. Potomac, Virginia is an extinct town formerly located in Arlington County. ... Potomac Yard was one of the busiest railroad yards on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.4 square miles (39.9 km²), of which, 15.2 square miles (39.3 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it is water. The total area is 1.49% water. Alexandria is bounded on the east by the Potomac River, on the north and northwest by Arlington County, and on the south by Fairfax County. The western portions of the city were annexed from those two entities beginning in the 1930s. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ...


The addressing system in Alexandria is not uniform and reflects the consolidation of several originally separate communities into a single city. In Old Town Alexandria, building numbers are assigned north and south from King Street and west (only) from the Potomac River. In the areas formerly in the Town of Potomac, such as Del Ray and St. Elmo, building numbers are assigned east and west from Commonwealth Avenue and north (only) from King Street. In the western parts of the city, building numbers are assigned north and south from Duke Street. An address is a code and abstract concept expressing the fixed location of a home, business or other building on the earths surface. ... King Street through Old Town Alexandria, as seen from the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ... Potomac, Virginia is an extinct town formerly located in Arlington County. ... State Route 236, also known as Little River Turnpike, is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. ...


The ZIP code prefix 223 uniquely identifies the Alexandria postal area. However, the Alexandria postal area extends well into Fairfax County and includes more addresses outside of the city than inside of it. Delivery areas have ZIP codes 22301 through 22312, 22314, and 22315, with other ZIP codes in use for post office boxes and large mailers. ZIP codes are not assigned in any particular geographic order. Mr. ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ... A Post Office box is a uniquely-addressable lockable box located on the premises of a Post Office station. ...


Neighborhoods

Old Town

Old Town, in the eastern and southeastern areas of Alexandria and on the Potomac River, is the oldest section of the city, originally laid out in 1749, and is a historic district. Old Town is chiefly known for its historic town houses, art galleries, antique shops, and restaurants. On the northern limits of Old Town is the remnants of a historic, predominantly African American community known by its inhabitants as "The Burg". The Burg was mentioned in the movie "Remember the Titans" which dramatizes the integration of city public schools in the 1970s through the creation of T.C. Williams High School. Few remnants of the Burg remain today. Old Town is laid out on a grid plan of substantially square blocks. A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... City Blocks are a part of the fictional universe recounted in the Judge Dredd series that appears in the UK comic book 2000 AD. // Overview Also known as starscrapers or stratoscrapers (compare skyscraper), they are the most common form of mass-housing in Mega-City One, averaging a population of...


Market Square in Old Town is the oldest continuously operating marketplace in the United States and was once the site of the second-largest slave market in the U.S. Today it contains a large fountain and extensive landscaping, as well as a farmers' market each Saturday morning. For specific places, see Market Square (disambiguation). ... A marketplace is the space, actual or metaphorical, in which a market operates. ... Slave redirects here. ...


Arlandria

Also known as Little El Salvador or Chirilagua, this area is well known bustling enclave of Salvadoran, Honduran, and Guatemalan immigrants. Many Latinos moved to this area after the destruction of a nearby old apartment complex that has now turned into all brand new condos and townhomes. Arlandria consists of a couple of apartment complexes concentrated on the border between Arlington and Alexandria on W. Glebe Road. Centered around Mount Vernon Avenue and West Glebe Road, it is home to nearly twenty Hispanic owned bakeries, restaurants, salons, and bookstores.


Del Ray

The area to the northwest of Old Town, formerly in the separate town of Potomac, is popularly known as Del Ray, although that name properly belongs to one of many communities (including Hume, Mount Ida, and Saint Elmo) in that area. The communities of Del Ray and St. Elmo originated in early 1894, when developer Charles Wood organized them on a grid pattern of streets running north-south and east-west. Del Ray originally contained six east-west streets and five north-south. All were identical in width, except Mt. Vernon Avenue, which was approximately twenty feet wider. St. Elmo, a smaller tract, was laid out in a similar pattern, but with only four east-west streets and one running north-south. Potomac, Virginia is an extinct town formerly located in Arlington County. ...


By 1900, Del Ray contained approximately 130 persons, and St. Elmo 55. In 1908, the tracts of Del Ray, St. Elmo, Mt. Ida, and Hume were incorporated into the town of Potomac, which by 1910 had a population of 599; by 1920 it contained 1,000; and by 1928 it had 2,355 residents.


The 254 acres (1 km²) comprising Del Ray were sold to Charles Wood in 1894 for the sum of $38,900, while St. Elmo, made up of 39 acres, was purchased for $15,314.


The community, while diverse, has experienced substantial gentrification since redevelopment began in Potomac Yard in the mid-1990s. The area has future development plans for condominiums, parks, and a fire station with affordable housing on upper floors. Del Ray now boasts many new restaurants and shops, and is considered one of the top 10 areas in the country for real estate investment. In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ... Potomac Yard was one of the busiest railroad yards on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. ... This article is about the form of housing. ...


West End

Alexandria's West End includes areas annexed from Fairfax County in the 1950s. It is the most typically suburban part of Alexandria, with a street hierarchy of winding roads and culs-de-sac. The section of Duke Street in the West End is known for a high-density residential area known to locals as "Landmark" and for its concentration of both strip and enclosed shopping malls. In more recent years, parts of Alexandria's West End have seen an influx of immigrants from Ethiopia, Eritrea, Afghanistan and Pakistan, who have settled in the areas surrounding Seminary Road west of I-395. A street hierarchy is a system of urban design that completely separates through automobile traffic from developed areas. ... For the musical group, see Cul de Sac (group). ... State Route 236, also known as Little River Turnpike, is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... Interstate 395 (abbreviated I-395) in Virginia is a 13 mile (21 km) long spur route that begins at a junction with Interstate 95 in Springfield, Virginia and ends in downtown Washington, District of Columbia. ...


The West End is composed of four main areas. All are west of Quaker Lane, the main north-south artery through Alexandria.


First is Seminary Hill a mostly residential, single-family dwelling area near the Virginia Theological Seminary and the Episcopal and St. Stephen's-St. Agnes High Schools off of Seminary Road, ending in the area just west of the Inova Alexandria Hospital.


West of Quaker, down the Duke Street corridor are communities of small homes, row houses, town homes along with commercial and retail real estate including the Foxchase Shopping Center. There are also areas of industrial businesses south of Duke Street primarily off of Wheeler Ave, South Pickett St and South Van Dorn St. The Charles E. Beatley, Jr. Alexandria Library, the city's main library, is located here. In the very southern part of this area is the Eisenhower Ave corridor running parallel to the Capital Beltway (I-95/I-495) which is industrial and commercial in nature. The Van Dorn Metro Station here provides access to Washington, DC.


The Landmark area, which includes Seminary Valley a large single family area developed in the 1950s, is largely garden style apartments and condo-converted apartment hi-rises as well as a number of townhome developments from the 1970s is west of North Pickett St bordered by I-395/Van Dorn Street on the west and Seminary Road on the north. The Landmark Mall, which presently includes Sears and Macy's was first developed in the mid-1960s (redevelopend in the 1980s) was Alexandria's primary retail area for decades.


The Seminary West neighborhoods are the communities west of I-395 but within the city limits of Alexandria. Beauregard Street is the primary artery running north & south to a mix of development from town home communities, single family neighborhoods, three large senior citizen living centers, garden and hi-rise apartments and condominiums. The Mark Center office development is a large commercial area in this community. The Northern Virginia Community College, Alexandria Campus and it's Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall & Arts Center is located in Seminary West. Northern Virginia Community College, comprising six locations in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., is the nations second largest multi-campus community college and the largest educational institution in the state of Virginia. ...


North Ridge

North Ridge, in northern Alexandria City, borders Arlington County and includes the very busy Braddock Road/King Street corridors. North Ridge takes it's name from the high ground west of Russell Road and south of West Glebe Road. It is a residential area with homes of numerous styles (mostly single family houses) that were largely developed in the period of the 1930s through the early 1960s. This neighborhood includes many houses of worship as well as one of Virginia's eight Scottish Rite temples, a Masonic order. North Ridge students attend George Mason and Charles Barrett Elementary Schools and feed into George Washington Middle School and T. C. Williams High School. The Lower School of private St. Stephens & St. Agnes school is located in the Jefferson Park neighbohood of North Ridge. It has been suggested that Knight Kadosh be merged into this article or section. ... T. C. Williams High School is a public high school in Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Named for a former superintendent of Alexandria City Public schools who served from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, it is located near the geographic center of the city, at 3330 King Street. ...


It is a neighborhood of walkers, joggers, and bicyclists, known for its friendliness and its profusion of crepe myrtles. Parks there include Monticello Park, Beverly Park and Robert Leider Park. All of the North Ridge community lies within the original 10 mile square of the District of Columbia, ceded back to Virginia in 1846.


Nearby Alexandria Neighborhoods

Many neighborhoods outside of the city limits including Franconia, Groveton, Hybla Valley, Huntington, Belle Haven, Mount Vernon, Engleside, Burgundy Village, Waynewood, Wilton Woods, Virginia Hills, Hayfield, and Kingstowne use an Alexandria address. Despite the Alexandria address, these areas are actually part of Fairfax County, not Alexandria City. Franconia is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Groveton is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Hybla Valley is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Belle Haven is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Mount Vernon is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Kingstowne is an unincorporated community in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... Fairfax County is a county in Northern Virginia, in the United States. ...


The Fort Hunt Neighborhood, adjacent to Fort Hunt Park a National Park Service picnic facility, runs next to the George Washington Parkway on the way to the Mount Vernon Estate. Here, cherry blossom trees are planted on the opposite side of the river but are still on the parkway.


Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 128,283 people, 61,889 households, and 27,726 families residing in the city. The population density was 8,452.0 people per square mile (3,262.9/km²). There were 64,251 housing units at an average density of 4,233.2/sq mi (1,634.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.79% White, 22.54% African American, 0.28% Native American, 5.65% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 7.38% from other races, and 4.27% from two or more races. 14.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ...


By 2005 58.3% of Alexandria's population was non-Hispanic whites. 21.7% were African-Americans, 0.4% Native Americans, 5.3% Asian and 13.7% Latino.


In 2000 there were 61,889 households out of which 18.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 55.2% were non-families. 43.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.04 and the average family size was 2.87. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 16.8% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 43.5% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.


According to a 2006 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $80,449, and the median income for a family was $102,388.[1] Males had a median income of $47,514 versus $41,254 for females. The per capita income for the city was $37,645. 8.9% of the population and 6.8% of families were below the poverty line. 13.9% of those under the age of 18 and 9.0% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Education

The city is served by the Alexandria City Public Schools system and by the Alexandria campus of Northern Virginia Community College. The largest seminary in the Episcopal Church, Virginia Theological Seminary, is located on Seminary Road. Virginia Tech's Alexandria Architecture Center, also known as WAAC, is located on Prince Street in Old Town, offering graduate programs in Urban Affairs and Planning, Public and International Affairs, and Architecture. Virginia Commonwealth University operates a Northern Virginia branch of its School of Social Work in Alexandria. George Washington University (Washington DC) also has an Alexandria campus near the King Street metro. This campus mainly offers professional and vocational programs, such as an executive MBA program, urban planning and security studies. Alexandria City Public Schools (a. ... Northern Virginia Community College, comprising six locations in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., is the nations second largest multi-campus community college and the largest educational institution in the state of Virginia. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Aspinwall Hall, dedicated 1859 Virginia Theological Seminary (VTS), formally called the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia,[1] is the largest accredited Episcopal seminary in the United States. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ...


Alexandria is home to several of the Washington D.C. area's top private schools, such as St. Stephen's and St. Agnes School, Episcopal High School, and Bishop Ireton High School. Also in the city are Alexandria Country Day School, Commonwealth Academy, St. Mary's Catholic School, St. Rita's Catholic School and Blessed Sacrament Learning Center. Students and faculty from the Thornton Friends School of Maryland, which closed its Virginia Campus in June 2006, have formed the new Alexandria Friends School to maintain Alexandria's tradition of Quaker education. St. ... Episcopal High School is a private boarding school located in Alexandria, Virginia. ... Bishop Ireton High School is a Catholic High School located in Alexandria, Virginia. ... Alexandria Friends School (AFS) is a private, non-profit Quaker high school (grades 9-12) located at 25 South Quaker Lane in Alexandria, Virginia. ...


Alexandria's public school system consists of thirteen elementary schools for grades 5-year-old Kindergarden thru Grade 5. Middle Schools, George Washington and Francis C. Hammond, serve 6th thru 8th graders. Minnie Howard Ninth Grade Center and T.C. Williams High School serve grades 9th and 10 thru 12, respectively, for the entire city. T.C. Williams High School T.C. Williams High School is the sole public high school in Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Named for T.C. Williams, a former superintendent of schools who served from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, it is located near the geographic center of the city...


T.C. Williams, and its legendary former head football coach, Herman Boone, former assistant coach Bill Yoast and the Virginia State Champion 1971 Titan football squad were featured in the 2000 Disney motion picture Remember the Titans starring Denzel Washington and Will Patton. T. C. Williams High School is a public high school in Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Named for a former superintendent of Alexandria City Public schools who served from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, it is located near the geographic center of the city, at 3330 King Street. ... Herman Boone was a former football coach at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Virginia. ... William Bill Yoast (born 1924) is an American high school football coach best known for being featured in the 2000 film Remember the Titans. ... Remember the Titans is an American drama film released in 2000. ... Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. ... Will Patton (born June 14, 1954) is an American actor. ...


Recreation and sites of interest

Alexandria has a distributed park system with approximately 950 acres (3.8 km²) spread across 70 major parks and 30 recreation centers, of which Chinquapin is one of the largest. Chinquapin offers facilities for swimming, tennis, racquetball, and other sports. The city also organizes several sports leagues throughout the year including volleyball, softball and basketball.


The city is unusual in that Cameron Run Regional Park includes a water park with a wave pool and water slides, as well as a miniature golf course and batting cages — facilities usually operated by private companies. A portion of the Mount Vernon Trail, a popular bike and jogging path, runs through Old Town near the Potomac River on its way from the Mount Vernon Estate to Roosevelt Island in Washington, DC. There is also a largely unbroken line of parks stretching along the Alexandria waterfront from end to end. A wave pool in use. ... A water slide A water slide is a type of slide or tube designed for warm-weather or indoor recreational use, typically with water pumped to its top and allowed to flow down its surface, although some may simply be wet. ... Eternite Miniature golf course Minigolf is a miniature version of the sport of golf. ... Map of the Trail The Mount Vernon Trail is a popular bike path in Northern Virginia that runs from near Theodore Roosevelt Island to Mount Vernon. ...


Landmarks within the city include the George Washington Masonic National Memorial (also known as the Masonic Temple) and Observation Deck, Christ Church, Gadsby's Tavern, John Carlyle House, Little Theatre of Alexandria, Lee-Fendall House, City Hall, Market Square, the Jones Point Lighthouse, the south cornerstone of the original District of Columbia, Robert E. Lee's boyhood home, the Torpedo Factory art studio complex, and the Virginia Theological Seminary. Other sites of historical interest in the city include Alexandria Black History Resource Center, Fort Ward Park and Museum, and the Alexandria Canal lock re-creation at Canal Office Center. Interesting sites with Alexandria addresses but outside of the city limits include River Farm, Collingwood Library & Museum, Green Spring Gardens Park, Huntley Meadows Park, Pope-Leighey House (a Frank Lloyd Wright design), Woodlawn Plantation, Washington's Grist Mill and Mount Vernon Estate. George Washington Masonic National Memorial George Washington Masonic National Memorial is a masonic lodge and memorial dedicated to the memory of George Washington, the first president of the United States of America and a Mason. ... Freemasons redirects here. ... Christ Church of Alexandria, Virginia Christ Church in Alexandria, Virginia, is an Episcopal Church built in 1773 by John Carlyle. ... Front view of the Gadsby Tavern Gadsbys Tavern Museum is a cultural history museum located in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, USA. The original tavern was a central part of the social, economic, political, and educational life of the city of Alexandria, and the United States. ... Lee Fendall House, Alexandria, Virginia The Lee-Fendall House, located at 614 Oronoco St. ... This is a list of the locations of the original boundary markers of the District of Columbia. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... Aspinwall Hall, dedicated 1859 Virginia Theological Seminary (VTS), formally called the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia,[1] is the largest accredited Episcopal seminary in the United States. ... River Farm (25 acres) is a historic landscape with gardens located at 7931 East Boulevard Drive, Alexandria, Virginia. ... Green Spring Gardens Park (26 acres) is a public park located at 4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, Virginia. ... The Pope-Leighey House, formerly known as the Loren Pope Residence, is a suburban house designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. ... Woodlawn Plantation is located in historic Fairfax County, Virginia, near Mount Vernon, George Washingtons historic home. ... Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. ...


Transportation

Alexandria is bisected north and south by State Route 7, known in most of the city as the major thoroughfare of King Street. Interstate 95/495 (the Capital Beltway), including the Woodrow Wilson Bridge over the Potomac River, approximately parallels the city's southern boundary with Fairfax County. Interstate 395 crosses through the western part of the city. Other major routes include U.S. Route 1 (named Jefferson Davis Highway, and Patrick and Henry Streets after Patrick Henry and Richmond Highway), the George Washington Memorial Parkway, and Duke Street (State Route 236). Virginia State Highway 7 (also known simply as Route 7) is a major surface highway and busy commuter route in Northern Virginia. ... King Street through Old Town Alexandria, as seen from the George Washington Masonic National Memorial. ... The Capital Beltway (in green) The Capital Beltway (Interstate 495) is an expressway-class interstate highway which circles the Washington, DC area. ... Interstate 95 (District of Columbia) redirects here. ... Interstate 395 (abbreviated I-395) in Virginia is a 13 mile (21 km) long spur route that begins at a junction with Interstate 95 in Springfield, Virginia and ends in downtown Washington, District of Columbia. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: U.S. Route 1 U.S. Route 1 (also called U.S. Highway 1, and abbreviated US 1) is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... Jefferson Davis Memorial Highway was named for Jefferson Davis (1808-1889). ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Map of the George Washington Memorial Parkway Vehicles round a bend in the George Washington Parkway near Washington National Airport and Gravelly Point in Arlington, Va. ... State Route 236, also known as Little River Turnpike, is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. ...


Alexandria is located just south of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington County. As with other Washington suburbs, Alexandria is also served by Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly and by Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport near Baltimore, Maryland. , Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (IATA: DCA, ICAO: KDCA, FAA LID: DCA) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) south of the central business district of Washington, D.C., in Arlington County, Virginia, United States. ... , FAA Airport Diagram Washington Dulles International Airport (IATA: IAD, ICAO: KIAD, FAA LID: IAD) is a public airport located 25 miles (40 km) west of the central business district of Washington, D.C., in Loudoun County and Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... Chantilly is an unincorporated community located in western Fairfax County, in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (IATA: BWI, ICAO: KBWI) serves the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area in the United States. ... Baltimore redirects here. ...


Alexandria Union Station, the city's historic train station, is served by both Amtrak intercity and Virginia Railway Express regional rail service. The station is directly adjacent to the King Street Metrorail station, at the convergence of the Blue and Yellow Lines. Three other Metrorail stations that lie within the city limits are Braddock Road, Van Dorn Street, and Eisenhower Avenue. Alexandria Union Station is a historic train station in Alexandria, Virginia south of Washington, D.C. To avoid confusion with nearby Washington Union Station it is usually referred to locally as simply Alexandria Station. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Virginia Railway Express (VRE) is a commuter railroad service that connects the Northern Virginia area with Washington, DC. The VRE operates on two lines, the Fredericksburg line, which starts from Fredericksburg, Virginia and the Manassas line, which starts from Broad Run Airport in Bristow, Virginia. ... King Street station entrance pylon. ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring suburban communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ... The Blue Line of the Washington Metro consists of 27 subway stations from Franconia_Springfield to Largo Town Center. ... The Yellow Line of the Washington Metro consists of twelve subway stations from Huntington to Mt Vernon Sq/7th St-Convention Center. ... Braddock Road station at night. ... A train arrives at Van Dorn Street. ... Eisenhower Avenue station. ...


The traditional boundary between Old Town and the latterly annexed sections of the city followed the railway now owned by CSX Transportation. CSX redirects here. ...


The city government operates its own mass transit system, the DASH bus, connecting points of interest with local transit hubs. Metrobus also serves Alexandria. Driving Alexandrians Safely Home (DASH) is the public bus system for the city of Alexandria, Virginia, operated by the Alexandria Transit Company. ... Metrobus is a bus service operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). ...


Sister cities

Alexandria has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between cities in the United States and cities in other countries. ...

Alexandria has been twinned with Caen, France since 1991. The sister city relationship sees delegations visiting between the two cities on a regular basis. Exchanges of students have been common. Musicians and choirs from the two cities have also made very successful visits. In most years, members of the Alexandria-Caen Sister City Committee travel to Caen for the foire de Caen, a large international trade fair held in mid-September. Along with Caen's other sister cities, the Alexandria delegation has the chance to introduce its city to the people of Normandy, while getting the chance to learn more about this historic region of France. Image File history File links Flag_of_Armenia. ... Location of Gyumri in Armenia Coordinates: , Country Marz Established 401 BC Government  - Mayor Vartan Ghukasyan Area  - City 36 km²  (13. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Coordinates: , Country Municipality County SkÃ¥ne County Province Scania Charter 1085 Area [1]  - Total 37. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ...


See also

This is a list of famous people and celebrities who were either born in or have lived in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area, including Maryland and northern Virginia. ...

References

  1. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ Discovering the Decades: 1810s. Alexandria Archaeology Museum.
  4. ^ Self-Guided Walking Tour Black Historic Sites. Alexandria Black History Museum.
  5. ^ Jim Barnett and H. Clark Burkett (2004). "The Forks of the Road Slave Market at Natchez". Mississippi History Now.
  6. ^ Photographs of African Americans During the Civil War: A List of Images in the Civil War Photograph Collection. Library of Congress (May 20, 2004).
  7. ^ Get to know D.C. - Frequently Asked Questions About Washington, D.C.. History Society of Washington D.C..
  8. ^ Fort Ward Museum. City of Alexandria.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Alexandria, Virginia is at coordinates 38°48′59″N 77°04′17″W / 38.816242, -77.071282 (Alexandria, Virginia)Coordinates: 38°48′59″N 77°04′17″W / 38.816242, -77.071282 (Alexandria, Virginia)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alexandria Virginia real estate (382 words)
Crowning the hilltops and river bluffs from the Chesapeake region west to the Blue Ridge and adding to the grace and elegance of the Virginia landscape are the classic Greek revival homes and public buildings with their stately porticoes.
Tobacco, Virginia's traditional staple, is still the leading crop, and grains, corn, soybeans, peanuts, sweet potatoes, cotton, and apples (especially in the Shenandoah Valley) are all important.
N Virginia has become the home of one of the largest concentrations of computer communications firms in the U.S. Other leading industries include tourism and the manufacture of chemicals, electrical equipment, and food, textile, and paper products.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m