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Encyclopedia > Alexander Suvorov

Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Васи́льевич Суво́ров) (sometimes transliterated as Aleksandr, Aleksander and Suvarov), Count Suvorov of Rymnik, Prince of Italy (граф Рымникский, князь Италийский) (November 24, 1729May 18, 1800), was the fourth and last Russian Generalissimo (not counting Stalin). One of the few great generals in history who never lost a battle, he was famed for his manual The Science of Victory and noted for the saying "Train hard, fight easy;" "A bullet will fool it, a bayonet won't say nyet." Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Countess redirects here. ... County Vâlcea Status County capital Mayor Mircia Gutau, Democratic Party, since 2004 Population (2002) 107,656 Geographical coordinates , Web site http://www. ... The term prince (the female form is princess), from the Latin root princeps, when used for a member of the highest aristocracy, has several fundamentally different meanings - one generic, and several types of titles. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A generalissimo is a commissioned officer of the highest rank; the word is often translated as Supreme Commander or Commander in Chief. It is an Italian superlative substantive, which grammatically would actually be disallowed in Italian (superlatives can be made with adjectives only). ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვილი; see Other names section) (December 21, 1879[1] – March 5, 1953) was a Bolshevik revolutionary and leader of the Soviet Union. ...

Contents


Early life and career

Suvorov was born into a noble family of Novgorod descent at the Moscow mansion of his maternal grandfather Fedosey Manukov (a landowner from Oryol gubernia and an official of Petr I). Since Manuk is a popular Armenian name meaning Young, it is often assumed that the Manukovs were of Armenian descent. Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the M10(E95) federal highway connecting Moscow and St. ... Government Russia District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Mayor Yuri Luzhkov Geographical characteristics Area  - City 1,081 km² Population  - City (2005)    - Density 10,415,400   8537. ... Oryol or Orel (Russian: ) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Oryol Oblast. ... Guberniya (also gubernia, guberniia, and gubernya) (Russian: губе́рния) was a major administrative subdivision of the Imperial Russia, usually translated as province or Governorate General. ... Portrait of Peter by Paul Delaroche Peter I (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич or Pyotr I Alekseyevich) (Peter Alexeyevich Romanov) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672– 28 January 1725 O.S.] [1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ...


Suvorov entered the army as a boy, served against the Swedes during the war in Finland and against the Prussians during the Seven Years' War (1756 - 1763). After repeatedly distinguishing himself in battle he became a colonel in 1762. The Russo-Swedish War of 1741-1743, known as the Hats Russian War in Sweden and the Lesser Wrath in Finland, was instigated by the Hats, a Swedish party which aspired to regain the territories lost to Russia during the Great Northern War, and by French diplomacy, which sought to... Flag of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1894-1918 Prussia (German: ; Latin: Borussia, Prutenia; Lithuanian: ; Old Prussian: Prūsa; Polish: ) was, most recently, a historic state originating in East Prussia, an area which for centuries had substantial influence on German and European history. ... Combatants Prussia, Great Britain, Hanover Austria, France, Russian Empire, Sweden, Saxony The Seven Years War (1754 and 1756–1763), some of whose theatres are called the Pomeranian War and the French and Indian War, was hailed by Winston Churchill as the first world war[1], as it was the first...

Image:Portrait of Count Alexander Suvorov , 1799.jpg
Portrait of Count Alexander Suvorov, 1799

Suvorov next served in Poland during the Confederation of Bar, dispersed the Polish forces under Pułaski, captured Kraków (1768) paving the way for the first partition of Poland[11] and reached the rank of major-general. The Russo-Turkish War of 1768–1774 saw his first campaigns against the Turks in 1773–1774, and particularly in the battle of Kozludji, he laid the foundations of his reputation. Prayer of the Bar Confederates. ... For things named to honor Kazimierz Pułaski, see: Pulaski (disambiguation). ... Tomb of Kazimierz the Great St. ... The Partitions of Poland (Polish Rozbiór or Rozbiory Polski) happened in the 18th century and ended the existence of a sovereign state of Poland (or more correctly the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In 1775, Suvorov was dispatched to suppress the rebellion of Pugachev, but arrived at the scene only in time to conduct the first interrogation of the rebel leader, who had been betrayed by his fellow Cossacks, and eventually beheaded in Moscow. Yemelian Ivanovich Pugachev (Russian: Емелья́н Ива́нович Пугачёв, best transliterated as Emelyan Ivanovich Pugachov), born in 1740 or 1742 and executed in 1775, as a pretender to the Russian throne led a Cossack insurrection during the reign of Catherine II. Background Pugachev, the son of a small Don Cossack landowner... This article needs cleanup. ...


Scourge of the Poles and the Turks

From 1777 to 1783 Suvorov served in the Crimea and in the Caucasus, becoming a lieutenant-general in 1780, and general of infantry in 1783, upon completion of his tour of duty there. From 1787 to 1791 he again fought the Turks during the Russo-Turkish War of 1787–1792 and won many victories; he was wounded twice at Kinburn (1787), took part in the siege of Ochakov, and in 1788 won two great victories at Focşani and by the river Rimnik. Motto: Процветание в единстве - Prosperity in unity Anthem: Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина - Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Capital Simferopol Largest cities Simferopol, Eupatoria, Kerch, Theodosia, Yalta Official language Ukrainian. ... The Entholinguistic patchwork of the modern Caucasus - CIA map The Caucasus, a region bordering Asia Minor, is located between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea which includes the Caucasus Mountains and surrounding lowlands. ... The Russo-Turkish War of 1787-1792 was a futile attempt by the Ottoman Empire to regain lands lost to Russia in the course of the Russo-Turkish War, 1768-1774. ... Kinburn can mean the following: Places: Kinburn, on the south coast, facing Ochakov, the site of the Russo-Turkish Battle of Kinburn (1787) and of an attack in the later Crimean War Kinburn, Ontario, in the Canadian province of Ontario, itself referring to either of: Kinburn, Huron County, Ontario Kinburn... Ochakov (Crimean Tatar/Turkish: Özi) is a town in Mykolaiv (Nikolaev) Oblast, in southern Ukraine, located near the site of ancient Greek colony of Olbia. ... County Vrancea County Status County capital Mayor Decebal Bacinschi, Social Democratic Party, since 2004 Population (2002) 103,219 Geographical coordinates , Web site http://www. ... Râmnicu Sărat is a town in the Buzău county, Romania The town rises from a marshy plain, east of the Carpathians, and west of the cornlands of southern Moldavia. ...


In both these battles an Austrian corps under Prince Josias of Saxe-Coburg participated, but at Rimnik Suvorov was in command of the whole allied forces. For the latter victory, Catherine the Great made Suvorov a count with the name "Rimniksky" in addition to his own name, and the Emperor Joseph II made him a count of the Holy Roman Empire. On 22 December 1790 Suvorov successfully stormed the reputedly impenetrable fortress of Ismail in Bessarabia. Turkish forces inside the fortress had the orders to stand their ground to the end and haughtily declined the Russian ultimatum. Their defeat was seen as a major catastrophe in the Ottoman empire, but in Russia it was glorified in the first national anthem, Let the thunder of victory sound! Prince Frederick Josias of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (26 December 1737 – 26 February 1815), a son of Duke Josias Francis of Coburg (German: Koburg) became a famous general of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Catherine II of Russia Catherine II the Great (Russian: Екатерина II Великая or Yekaterina II Velikaya, 2 May 1729 — 6 November [O.S. 17 November] 1796), born Sophie Augusta Fredericka of Anhalt-Zerbst) — sometimes referred to as an epitome of the enlightened despot — reigned as Empress of Russia for more than three... Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II Joseph II (March 13, 1741 – February 20, 1790) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790. ... The Holy Roman Empire and from the 16th century on also The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Izmail or Ismail (Ukrainian: ; Russian: ; Romanian: Ismail), is a town in south-western Ukraine, located near Danube delta in Odessa Oblast (province). ... 1927 map of Bessarabia from Charles Upson Clarks book Bessarabia or Bessarabiya (Basarabia in Romanian, Besarabya in Turkish) was the name by which the Imperial Russia designated the eastern part of the principality of Moldavia ceded by the Ottoman Empire to Russia in the aftermath of the Russo-Turkish... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanl... Grom pobedy, razdavajsya! (Гром победы, раздавайся!, English: Let the thunder of victory sound) was an unofficial Russian national anthem in the late 18th—early 19th century. ...


Immediately after the peace with Turkey was signed, Suvorov was again transferred to Poland, where he assumed the command of one of the corps and took part in the Battle of Maciejowice, in which he captured the Polish commander-in-chief Tadeusz Kościuszko. On November 4, 1794, Suvorov's forces stormed Warsaw and captured Praga, one of its boroughs. The massacre of approximately 20,000 civilians in Praga[12] broke the spirits of the defenders and soon put an end to the Kościuszko Uprising. According to some sources [1] the massacre was the deed of Cossacks who were semi-independent and were not directly subordinated to Suvorov. The Russian general was supposedly trying to stop the massacre and even went as far as to order the destruction of the bridge to Warsaw over the Vistula river [2] with the purpose of preventing the spread of violence to Warsaw from its suburb. Other historians dispute this[3], but most sources make no reference to Suvorov neither purposedly encouraging or preventing the massacre.[4]. The Battle of Maciejowice was fought on October 10, 1794 between Poland and Russia. ... Tadeusz Kościuszko. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Warsaw (Polish: , (?), in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto StoÅ‚eczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... The Battle of Praga (or a Battle of Warsaw of 1794) refers to the Russian assault of Praga, the easternmost suburb of Warsaw, during the KoÅ›ciuszko Uprising in 1794. ... The Kościuszko Uprising took place in Poland in 1794. ... Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks to Sultan Mehmed IV of Turkey. ... The Vistula (Polish: WisÅ‚a) is the longest river in Poland. ...

Exiled Suvorov receiving the Emperor's order to lead the Russian army against Napoleon.
Exiled Suvorov receiving the Emperor's order to lead the Russian army against Napoleon.

It is said that the Russian commander sent a report to his sovereign consisting of only three words: Hurrah from Warsaw, Suvorov. The Empress of Russia replied equally briefly: Congratulations, Field Marshal. Catherine. The newly-appointed field marshal remained in Poland until 1795, when he returned to Saint Petersburg. But his sovereign and friend Catherine died in 1796, and her successor Paul I dismissed the veteran in disgrace. Peter Gellers painting Suvorov in exile receiving the Emperors order to lead the Russian army against Napoleon. ... Peter Gellers painting Suvorov in exile receiving the Emperors order to lead the Russian army against Napoleon. ... Monument to Suvorov as youthful Mars, the Roman god of war (1801). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Catherine II of Russia Catherine II the Great (Russian: Екатерина II Великая or Yekaterina II Velikaya, 2 May 1729 — 6 November [O.S. 17 November] 1796), born Sophie Augusta Fredericka of Anhalt-Zerbst) — sometimes referred to as an epitome of the enlightened despot — reigned as Empress of Russia for more than three... Paul I of Russia by Vladimir Borovikovsky Paul I of Russia (Russian: ; Pavel Petrovich) (October 1, 1754–March 23, 1801) was an Emperor of Russia (1796–1801). ...


Suvorov's Italian campaign

Suvorov spent the next few years in retirement on his estate Konchanskoe near Borovichi. He criticised the new military tactics and dress introduced by the emperor, and some of his caustic verse reached the ears of Paul. His conduct therefore came under surveillance and his correspondence with his wife, who had remained at Moscow - for his marriage relations had not been happy - was tampered with. On Sundays he tolled the bell for church and sang among the rustics in the village choir. On week days he worked among them in a smock frock. But in February 1799 Emperor Paul I summoned him to take the field again, this time against the French Revolutionary armies in Italy. Borovichi (Russian: ) is a town in Novgorod Oblast, Russia. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People, a painting by Delacroix commemorating the July Revolution of 1830 but which has come to be generally accepted as symbolic of French popular uprisings against the monarchy in general and the French Revolution in particular. ...


The campaign opened with a series of Suvorov's victories (Cassano d'Adda, Trebbia, Novi). This reduced the French government to desperate straits and drove every French soldier from Italy, save for the handful under Moreau, which maintained a foothold in the Maritime Alps and around Genoa. Suvorov himself gained the rank of "prince of the House of Savoy" from the king of Sardinia. Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, Spain, Russia, Sardinia France The French Revolutionary Wars occurred between the outbreak of war between the French Revolutionary government and Austria in 1792 and the Treaty of Amiens in 1802. ... Battle of Cassano or Battle of Cassano dAdda refers to: 1158 Battle of Cassano fought by Federico Barbarossa against the Milan citizens 1259 Battle of Cassano fought by Ezzelino III da Romano and Oberto Pallavicino of Cremona against the Guelph League 1705 Battle of Cassano during the War of... The battle of Trebia was fought on June 19, Austrians and Russians under General Suvorov against the French under General Macdonald. ... The battle of Novi was a battle in the French Revolutionary Wars that was fought on August 15, 1799. ... Jean Victor Marie Moreau Jean Victor Mark Andrew Moreau (February 14, 1763 – September 2, 1813) was a French general. ... Maritime Alps The chief peaks of the Maritime Alps, from the Col de Tenda to the Col de lArgentiere, are: The chief passes of the Maritime Alps, from the Col de Tenda to the Col de lArgentiere, are: This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclop... Location within Italy Genoa (Italian Genova, Genoese (dialect of Ligurian) Zena, French Gênes, German Genua, Spanish Génova, Galician Xénova) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. ... The House of Savoy was a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region between Piedmont, Italy, France and French-speaking Switzerland. ... Charles Emmanuel IV, King of Sardinia from 1796 to 1802. ...

Russian troops under Generalissimo Suvorov crossing the Alps in 1799.
Russian troops under Generalissimo Suvorov crossing the Alps in 1799.

But the later events of the eventful year went uniformly against the Russians. General Korsakov's force was defeated by Masséna at Zürich. Betrayed by the Austrians, the old field marshal, seeking to make his way over the Swiss passes to the Upper Rhine, had to retreat to Vorarlberg, where the army, much shattered and almost destitute of horses and artillery, went into winter quarters. When Suvorov battled his way through the snow-capped Alps his army was checked but never defeated. For this marvel of strategic retreat, unheard of since the time of Hannibal, Suvorov was raised to the unprecedented rank of generalissimo. He was officially promised to be given the military triumph in Russia but the court intrigues led the Emperor Paul to cancel the ceremony. Russian Troops under Suvorov Crossing the Alps in 1799. ... Russian Troops under Suvorov Crossing the Alps in 1799. ... A generalissimo is a commissioned officer of the highest rank; the word is often translated as Supreme Commander or Commander in Chief. It is an Italian superlative substantive, which grammatically would actually be disallowed in Italian (superlatives can be made with adjectives only). ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Aleksandr Mikhaylovich Rimsky-Korsakov (1753-1840) — infantry general Petr Aleksandrovich Korsakov (1790-1844) — writer Aleksandr Mikhaylovich Dondukov-Korsakov (1820-1893) — knyaz, cavalry general, Russian administrator (Imperial Commissioner) in Bulgaria Dmitry Aleksandrovich Korsakov (1843-1920) — professor of history Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908) — composer Sergei Sergeyevich Korsakov (1854—1900) — psychiatrist... André Masséna, Marshal of France André Masséna (May 6, 1758, Nice – April 4, 1817), Duke of Rivoli, Prince of Essling, was a French soldier in the armies of Napoleon and a Marshal of France. ... Location within Switzerland (German pronunciation IPA: ; in English often Zurich, without the umlaut) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and capital of the canton of Zürich. ... Vorarlberg is the westernmost state (Land) of Austria. ... The West face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... Bust of Hannibal Hannibal (247 BC – 183/182 BC; sometimes referred to as HÇŽnnibal Barca) was a Carthaginian politician and statesman who is considered to be one of the finest military generals in history. ... A generalissimo is a commissioned officer of the highest rank; the word is often translated as Supreme Commander or Commander in Chief. It is an Italian superlative substantive, which grammatically would actually be disallowed in Italian (superlatives can be made with adjectives only). ... Triumph is a British car brand (see Triumph Motor Company), as well as a motorcycle brand (see Triumph Motorcycles). ...


Early in 1800 Suvorov returned to Saint Petersburg. Paul refused to give him an audience, and, worn out and ill, the old veteran died a few days afterwards on 18 May 1800, at Saint Petersburg. Lord Whitworth, the English ambassador, and the poet Derzhavin were the only persons of distinction present at the funeral. May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Gavrila Romanovich Derzhavin (Гаврила Романович Державин, 1743 – 1816) was the greatest Russian poet before Alexander Pushkin. ...


Suvorov lies buried in the church of the Annunciation in the Alexander Nevsky Monastery, the simple inscription on his grave stating, according to his own direction, "Here lies Suvorov". But within a year of his death the tsar Alexander I erected a statue to his memory in the Field of Mars (Saint Petersburg). View of the monastery in the early 19th century Alexander Nevsky Monastery was founded by Peter the Great in 1710 at the southern end of the Nevsky Prospect in St Petersburg to house the relics of Alexander Nevsky, patron saint of the newly-founded Russian capital. ... Aleksander I Pavlovich Romanov (Russian: Александр I Павлович) (December 23, 1777–December 1, 1825), was Emperor of Russia from March 23, 1801–December 1, 1825 and King of Poland from 1815–1825, as well as the first Grand Duke of Finland. ... Rumyantsev Obelisk used to grace the Field of Mars until 1818, when it was moved to its present location on Vasilievsky Island. ...


His progeny and titles

His full name and titles (according to Russian pronunciation), ranks and awards are the following: Aleksandr Vasiliyevich Suvorov, Prince of Italy, Count of Rimnik, Count of the Holy Roman Empire, Prince of Sardinia, Generalissimo of Russia's Ground and Naval forces, Field Marshal of the Austrian and Sardinian Armies; seriously wounded six times, he was the recipient of the Order of St. Andrew the First Called Apostle, Order of St. George the Triumphant First Class, Order of St. Vladimir First Class, Order of Alexander Nevsky, Order of St. Anna First Class, Grand Cross of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, (Austria) Order of Maria Teresia First Class, (Prussia) Order of the Black Eagle, Order of the Red Eagle, the Pour le Merite, (Sardinia) Order of the Revered Saints Maurice and Lazarus, (Bavaria) Order of St. Gubert, the Golden Lionness, (France) Order of the Carmelite Virgin Mary, St. Lasara, (Poland) Order of the White Eagle, the Order of St. Stanislaus. Sardinia [[]] (Sardegna in Italian, Sardigna or Sardinna in the Sardinian language, is the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (Sicily is the largest), between Italy, Spain and Tunisia, south of Corsica. ... Collar and Breast Star of the Order of St. ... The Order of St. ... The Order of Saint Vladimir was an Imperial Russian Order established in 1782 in memory of the deeds of Saint Vladimir, the Kniaz (Prince) and the Baptizer of the Kievan Rus. ... Soviet version of the order Order of Alexander Nevsky (Russian: Орден Александра Невского) was first instituted in 1725 by Catherine I of Russia. ... The Order of St. ... This page deals with the order after its revival in the 19th century. ... Order of the White Eagle (badge) The Order of the White Eagle (Polish Order Orła Białego) is Polands highest decoration awarded to both civilians and the military for their merits. ... Order of Saint Stanislas (Polish: Order św. ...


Suvorov's son Arkadi (1783 - 1811) served as a general officer in the Russian army during the Napoleonic and Turkish wars of the early 19th century, and drowned in the same river Rimnik that had brought his father so much fame. His grandson Alexander Arkadievich (1804 - 1882) also became a Russian general.


Assessment

Suvorov monument in the Swiss Alps
Enlarge
Suvorov monument in the Swiss Alps

The Russians long cherished the memory of Suvorov. A great captain, viewed from the standpoint of any age of military history, he functions specially as the great captain of the Russian nation, for the character of his leadership responded to the character of the Russian soldier. In an age when war had become an act of diplomacy he restored its true significance as an act of force. He had a great simplicity of manner, and while on a campaign lived as a private soldier, sleeping on straw and contenting himself with the humblest fare. But he had himself passed through all the gradations of military service. Suvorov monument in the Swiss Alps. ... Suvorov monument in the Swiss Alps. ... One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ... The word leadership can refer to: the process of leading the concept of leading those entities that perform one or more acts of leading. ... The United Nations, with its headquarters in New York City, is the largest international diplomatic organization. ...


His gibes procured him many enemies. He had all the contempt of a man of ability and action for ignorant favourites and ornamental carpet-knights. But his drolleries served sometimes to hide, more often to express, a soldierly genius, the effect of which the Russian army did not soon outgrow. If the tactics of the Russians in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904 - 1905 reflected too literally some of the maxims of Suvorov’s Turkish wars, the spirit of self-sacrifice, resolution and indifference to losses there shown formed a precious legacy from those wars. Mikhail Ivanovich Dragomirov declared that he based his teaching on Suvorov's practice, which he held representative of the fundamental truths of war and of the military qualities of the Russian nation. Insert non-formatted text here Combatants Imperial Russia Empire of Japan Strength 500,000 Soldiers 400,000 Soldiers Casualties 25,331 Killed 146,032 Wounded 47,387 Killed 173,425 Wounded Greater Manchuria, Russian (outer) Manchuria is region to upper right in lighter Red; Liaodong Peninsula is the wedge extending... Mikhail Ivanovich Dragomirov (Михаил Иванович Драгомиров in Russian) (November 8(20), 1830 - October 15(28), 1905) was a Russian general and military writer. ...


The magnificent Suvorov museum of military history was opened in 1904. Apart from St Petersburg, other Suvorov monuments have been erected in Ochakov (1907), Sevastopol, Izmail, Tulchin, Kobrin, Ladoga, Kherson, Timanovka, Simferopol, Kaliningrad, Konchanskoe, Rymnik, and in the Swiss Alps. On July 29, 1942 The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR established the Order of Suvorov. It was awarded for successful offensive actions against superior enemy forces. 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR (Президиум Верховного Совета СССР in Russian, or Prezidium Verkhovnogo Soveta) was a Soviet governmental body. ... The Order of Suvorov (Russian Орден Суворова) is a Soviet award, named after Aleksandr Suvorov, was established on July 29, 1942 (during World War II) by a Decision of the Presidium of Supreme Soviet of the USSR. The medal was created to award army personnel for exceptional duty in combat operations. ...


Note

References

Inline
  1. ^ (Russian) Alexander Bushkov Russia that never existed, cites Adam Jerzy Czartoryski's memoirs that Suvorov was trying to prevent the massacre
  2. ^ (Russian)A. F. Petrushevsky. "Generalissimo Prince Suvorov", chapter "Polish war: Praga, 1794", originally published 1884, reprinted 2005, ISBN 5-98447-010-1
  3. ^ (Polish) Janusz Tazbir, Polacy na Kremlu i inne historyje (Poles on Kreml and other stories), Iskry, 2005, ISBN 8320717957, fragment online
  4. ^ [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10]
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • John T. Alexander, Catherine the Great: Life and Legend, Oxford University Press US, 1999, ISBN 0195061624
  • John P. Ledonne, The Grand Strategy of the Russian Empire, Oxford University Press US, 2003, 0195161009

Prince Adam Jerzy Czartoryski, in English: Adam George Czartoryski (January 14, 1770 — July 15, 1861), Polish szlachcic, statesman and author, son of Prince Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski and Izabela Fleming (it is rumoured he was a fruit of her liaison with Russian ambassador to Poland Nikolai Repnin[1]). He was known... Janusz Tazbir is a Polish historian, specializing in culture and religion of Poland in 16th and 17th centuries. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Further reading

  • Anthing, Versuch einer Kriegsgeschichte des Grafen Suworow (Gotha, 1796 - 1799)
  • F. von Smut, Suworows Leben und Heerzüge (Vilna, 1833—1834) and Suworow and Polens Untergang (Leipzig, 1858,)
  • Von Reding-Biberegg, Der Zug Suworows durch die Schweiz (Zürich 1896)
  • Lieut.-Colonel Spalding, Suvorof (London, 1890)
  • G. von Fuchs, Suworows Korrespondenz, 1799 (Glogau, 1835)
  • Souvorov en Italie by Gachot, Masséna’s biographer (Paris, 1903)
  • The standard Russian biographies of Polevoi (1853; Ger. trans., Mitau, 1853); Rybkin (Moscow, 1874), Vasiliev (Vilna, 1899), Meshcheryakov and Beskrovnyi (Moscow, 1946), and Osipov (Moscow, 1955).
  • The Russian examinations of his martial art, by Bogolyubov (Moscow, 1939) and Nikolsky (Moscow, 1949).
  • "1799 le baionette sagge" by Marco Galandra and Marco Baratto (Pavia, 1999).

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Alexander Suvorov - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1792 words)
Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Васи́льевич Суво́ров) (sometimes transliterated as Aleksandr, Aleksander and Suvarov), Count Suvorov of Rymnik, Prince of Italy (граф Рымникский, князь Италийский) (November 24, 1729 – May 18, 1800), was the fourth and last Russian Generalissimo (not counting Stalin).
Suvorov was born into a noble family of Novgorod descent at the Moscow mansion of his maternal grandfather Fedosey Manukov (a landowner from Oryol gubernia and an official of Petr I).
Suvorov himself gained the rank of "prince of the House of Savoy" from the king of Sardinia.
A.V.SUVOROV (2372 words)
Alexander Suvorov was born in the family of General Vasily Ivanovich Suvorov.
In 1742 Alexander Suvorov was enlisted to the Leib-Guards Semenovsky regiment as a private of musketeers (in excess of the staff and without salary).
Under Suvorov's plan Ismail was stormed by 9 assault columns, three of that were based on the island Chatal and landed to the city from boats of the rowing flotilla.
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