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Encyclopedia > Alexander Stephens
Alexander Hamilton Stephens


In office
February 11, 1861 – May 11, 1865
President Jefferson Davis
Preceded by Office instituted
Succeeded by Office abolished

Born February 11, 1812(1812-02-11)
Taliaferro County, Georgia
Died March 4, 1883 (aged 71)
Atlanta, Georgia
Nationality American
Political party Whig, Democratic
Profession Lawyer
This is an article about the Confederate Vice President. For the shipbuilding company, see Alexander Stephen and Sons

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812March 4, 1883) was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. He also served as a congressman from Georgia and as Governor of Georgia from 1882 until his death in 1883. Image File history File links Alexander-Stephens-CSVP.jpg‎ http://hdl. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Taliaferro County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Atlanta redirects here. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Alexander Stephen and Sons Limited, often referred to simply as Alex Stephens or just Stephens, was a British shipbuilding company based in Linthouse, Govan in Scotland, on the River Clyde. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Early life and career

Stephens was born on a farm near Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia to Andrew B. and Margaret Grier Stephens. He grew up poor and acquired his education through the generosity of several benefactors, one of whom was the Presbyterian minister Alexander Hamilton Webster. Out of deep respect for his mentor, Stephens adopted Webster's middle name, Hamilton, as his own. (He was not named after Alexander Hamilton as most assume.) Stephens attended the Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in Athens, where he was roommates with Crawford W. Long and a member of the Phi Kappa Literary Society. He graduated at the top of his class in 1832. Stephens made public comments that he hated Georgia, and, in fact, the institution of slavery. After an unhappy couple of years teaching school, he pursued legal studies, passed the bar in 1834, and began a successful career as a lawyer in Crawfordville. During his 32 years of practice, he gained (among other things) a reputation for being a capable defender of the wrongfully accused. Of all his defendants charged with capital crimes, not one of them was executed. One notable case was the trial of a black slave woman who was accused of attempted murder. Despite the circumstantial evidence presented against her, Stephens volunteered to defend her in court and successfully persuaded the jury to acquit the woman, thus saving her life. Crawfordville is a city located in Taliaferro County, Georgia. ... Taliaferro County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a large number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757[1]—July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Crawford Williamson Long, November 1, 1815-June 16, 1878, was an American physician and pharmacist. ... Phi Kappa Hall circa 1933 For other uses, see Phi Kappa. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


As his wealth increased, Stephens began acquiring land and slaves. By the time of the American Civil War, Stephens owned 34 slaves and several thousand acres. In 1836, Stephens began what became a lifelong career in public service when he was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives. He served there until moving on to the Georgia State Senate in 1842. Slave sale in Easton, Maryland The history of slavery in the United States (1619-1865) began soon after the English colonists first settled in Virginia and lasted until the passage of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Georgia House of Representatives is the lower house of the General Assembly (the state legislature) of Georgia. ... Seal of the Georgia Senate The Georgia State Senate is the upper house of the Georgia General Assembly (the state legislature of Georgia). ...


Congressional career

Alexander Stephens

In 1842, Stephens was elected as a Whig to the United States House of Representatives to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mark A. Cooper. He was re-elected to the 29th through 31st Congresses, as a Unionist to the 32nd Congress, as a Whig to the 33rd Congress, and as a Democrat to the 34th and 35th Congresses, serving October 2, 1843 to March 3, 1859. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (613x818, 101 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (613x818, 101 KB) http://hdl. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Mark Anthony Cooper (April 20, 1800 - March 17, 1885) was a United States Representative, businessman and lawyer from Georgia. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


As a national lawmaker during the crucial two decades before the American Civil War, Stephens was involved in all the major sectional battles. He began as a moderate defender of slavery, but later accepted all of the prevailing Southern rationales used to defend the institution. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Stephens quickly rose to prominence as one of the leading Southern Whigs in the House. He supported the annexation of Texas in 1845. Along with his fellow Whigs, he vehemently opposed the Mexican-American War. He was an equally vigorous opponent of the Wilmot Proviso, which would have barred the extension of slavery into territories acquired by the United States during the war with Mexico. Stephens along with fellow Georgia congressman Robert Toombs worked diligently to secure the election of Zachary Taylor in 1848. Both were chagrined and angered when Taylor proved less than pliable on aspects of the Compromise of 1850. The death of Taylor removed the major barrier to passage of the compromise measures. Stephens and Toombs both supported the Compromise of 1850, and then returned to Georgia to secure support for the measures at home. Both men were instrumental in the drafting and approval of the Georgia Platform, which rallied unionists throughout the Deep South. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... The Wilmot Proviso was introduced on August 8, 1846 in the House of Representatives as a rider on a $2 million appropriations bill intended for the final negotiations to resolve the Mexican-American War. ... Postbellum photograph of Robert A. Toombs. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... The Georgia Platform was a statement executed by a Georgia Convention in response to the Compromise of 1850. ... For other uses, see Deep South (disambiguation). ...


By this time, Stephens had departed the ranks of the Whig party—its northern wing proving inimical to what he regarded as non-negotiable Southern interests. Back in Georgia, Stephens, Toombs, and Democratic Congressman Howell Cobb formed the Constitutional Union Party. The party overwhelmingly carried the state in the ensuing election and, for the first time, Stephens returned to Congress no longer a Whig. Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815–October 9, 1868) was an American political figure. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ...


Despite his late arrival to the Democratic Party, Stephens quickly rose, even serving as James Buchanan's floor manager in the House during the battle for the Lecompton Constitution for the Kansas Territory in 1857. James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... The Lecompton Constitution was one of four proposed Kansas state constitutions. ... map of Kansas Territory Kansas Territory was an organized territory of the United States that existed from May 30, 1854 to January 29, 1861, when Kansas became the 34th U.S. state admitted to the Union. ...


Stephens did not run for renomination in 1858. Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Civil War

In 1861, Stephens served as a delegate to the Georgia convention that voted to secede from the United States. During the state convention, as well as during the 1860 presidential campaign, Stephens called for the South to remain loyal to the Union, likening it to a leaking but fixable boat. During the convention he reminded his fellow delegates that Republicans were a minority in Congress (especially in the Senate) and, even with a Republican president, would be forced to compromise just as the two sections had for decades. And, because the Supreme Court had voted 7–2 in the Dred Scott case, it would take decades of Senate-approved appointments to reverse it. He voted against secession in the Georgia convention but asserted the right to secede if the federal government continued allowing northern states to effectively nullify the Constitutionally empowered Fugitive Slave Law with so-called "personal liberty laws" that made recapture go through trial. He was elected to the Confederate Congress, and was chosen by the Congress as vice president of the provisional government. He was then elected vice president of the Confederacy. He took the oath of office on February 11, 1861, and served until his arrest on May 11, 1865. Vice President Stephens officially served in office eight days longer than President Jefferson Davis; he took his oath seven days prior to Davis's inauguration and was captured the day after Davis. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (910x595, 195 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (910x595, 195 KB) http://hdl. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Stephen Russell Mallory (c. ... Christopher Gustavus Memminger (January 9, 1803–March 7, 1888) was a prominent Confederate political leader. ... Image:Walder, Leroy Pope 1. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... John Henninger Reagan (October 8, 1818–March 6, 1905), was an 19th century Texan Democratic politician and Postmaster-General of the Confederacy. ... Postbellum photograph of Robert A. Toombs. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Holding States do not have the right to claim an individuals property that was fairly theirs in another state. ... The Fugitive Slave Law of the United States may refer to one of two laws of the same name: Fugitive Slave Law of 1793 Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ...

Alexander Stephens in his later years.

On the brink of the Civil War, on March 21, 1861, Stephens gave his famous Cornerstone Speech in Savannah, Georgia. In it he reaffirmed that "African Slavery … was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution." He went on to assert that the then-prevailing "assumption of the equality of races" was "fundamentally wrong." "Our new [Confederate] government is founded … upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery—subordination to the superior race—is his natural and normal condition," and, furthermore, "With us, all of the white race, however high or low, rich or poor, are equal in the eye of the law. Not so with the negro. Subordination is his place. He, by nature, or by the curse against Canaan, is fitted for that condition which he occupies in our system." Image File history File links AlexStephens2. ... Image File history File links AlexStephens2. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Cornerstone Speech was delivered by Confederate Vice President, Alexander Stephens in Savannah, Georgia on March 21, 1861. ... This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedias quality standards. ... The curse of Ham (also called the curse of Canaan) refers to the curse that Noah placed upon Canaan (the son of Ham) after Ham had done something to Noah while Noah was naked and unconscious because of drunkenness in his tent. ...


Stephens suffered from illness and disease throughout his life; he weighed only 96 pounds. While his voice was described as shrill and unpleasant, at the beginning of the Civil War, a northern newspaper described him as "the Strongest Man in the South" because of his intelligence, judgment, and eloquence.


A staunch states rights enthusiast, actions of the Davis government soon drove Stephens into political opposition. He returned to Georgia and became a champion of Governor Joseph E. Brown. In 1862 Stephens became the leader of the Senate opposition to the Davis administration.[citation needed] However, he stayed good friends with Jefferson Davis, and was a stanch supporter of Davis. In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... Joseph Emerson Brown (1821-1894) Joseph Emerson Brown (April 15, 1821 – November 30, 1894), often referred to as Joe Brown, was a Governor of Georgia from 1857 to 1865, and a U.S. Senator from 1880 to 1891. ...


On February 3, 1865, serving as one of several commissioners representing the Confederacy, he met with President Abraham Lincoln on the steamer River Queen at the Hampton Roads Conference, which attempted to reach a peaceful ending to the Civil War. He was arrested at his home in Crawfordville, Georgia, on May 11, 1865. is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... On February 3, 1865, near Fort Monroe aboard a ship, the River Queen, President Lincoln and Secretary Seward, representing the United States government, met with Vice President Alexander H. Stephens, Senator M. T. Hunter, and Assistant Secretary of War John A. Campbell, representing the Confederate States of America. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Postbellum career

John White Alexander's portrait of Alexander Stephens
John White Alexander's portrait of Alexander Stephens
Alexander Stephens gravesite memorial at Liberty Hall

After the Civil War, he was imprisoned in Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, for five months until October 1865. In 1866 he was elected to the United States Senate by the first legislature convened under the new Georgia State constitution, but did not present his credentials, as the State had not been readmitted to the Union. He was elected as a Democrat to the 43rd Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ambrose R. Wright, and was re-elected to the 44th and to the three succeeding Congresses, serving from December 1, 1873 until his resignation on November 4, 1882, at which time he was elected governor of Georgia. His tenure as governor proved brief; Stephens died on March 4, 1883, mere weeks after taking office. According to a former slave, a gate fell on Stephens "and he was crippled and lamed up from dat time on 'til he died." [1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (792x957, 225 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alexander Stephens ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (792x957, 225 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alexander Stephens ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 895 KB) Summary I took this picture at Liberty Hall in Crawfordville, Georgia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 895 KB) Summary I took this picture at Liberty Hall in Crawfordville, Georgia. ... Fort Warren defended the harbor at Boston, Massachusetts, for over 100 years. ... Boston redirects here. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Ambrose Ransom Wright (April 26, 1826 – December 21, 1872) was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This is a list of Governors of the state of Georgia, including governors of the British colony of Georgia. ...


He was interred in Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta, then re-interred on his estate, Liberty Hall, near Crawfordville, Georgia. For other uses, see Oakland (disambiguation). ... Liberty Hall in Crawfordville, Georgia Liberty Hall was the Crawfordville, Georgia home of the Vice President of the Confederate States of America, Alexander Stephens. ... Crawfordville is the name of some places in the United States of America: Crawfordville, Florida Crawfordville, Georgia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


He published A Constitutional View of the War between the States (two volumes, 1868-70) in which he wrote about the South's position in regard to the doctrines of State sovereignty and secession. “Sovereign” redirects here. ...


He is pictured on the CSA $20.00 banknote (3rd, 5th, 6th, and 7th issues). Six Confederate notes The Confederate States of America dollar was first issued into circulation in April, 1861, when the Confederacy was only two months old, and on the eve of the outbreak of the Civil War. ...


Toccoa, Georgia serves as seat of a county in north Georgia that bears his name, as does a state park just outside of Crawfordville, Georgia. Toccoa is a famous city in Stephens County, Georgia, United States. ... Crawfordville is a city located in Taliaferro County, Georgia. ...


Georgians frequently refer to Stephens as "Little Aleck."


See also

A.H. Stephens Historic Park is a 1,177 acre (4. ...

References

  • Thomas E. Schott, Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia: A Biography (1988)
  • Rudolph R. von Abele, Alexander H. Stephens: A Biography (1946)
  • William C. Davis, The Union that Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs & Alexander H. Stephens (2002)
  • Richard Malcolm Johnston & William Hand Browne, Life of Alexander H. Stephens (1883). Originally published in 1878.
  • Henry Cleveland, Alexander H. Stephens in Public and Private, with Letters and Speeches (1866)
  • W.P.Trent, Southern Statesmen of the Old Régime (1897)
  • Jon L. Wakelyn, Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy
  • Wilson, Edmund. Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War (1962) ch 11, on his book
  • Biographical article from Harper's Weekly, February 23, 1861.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Alexander Stephens
Preceded by
Mark A. Cooper
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's At-large congressional district

October 2, 1843March 3, 1845
Served alongside: Edward J. Black, Howell Cobb, Hugh A. Haralson, Absalom H. Chappell, John H. Lumpkin, John Millen, Duncan L. Clinch and William H. Stiles
Succeeded by
(none)
Preceded by
(none)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 7th congressional district

March 4, 1845March 3, 1853
Succeeded by
David A. Reese
Preceded by
Robert A. Toombs
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 8th congressional district

March 4, 1853March 3, 1859
Succeeded by
John J. Jones
Preceded by
(none)
Representative to the Provisional Confederate Congress from Georgia
1861
Succeeded by
(none)
Vice President of the Confederate States
February 11, 1861May 11, 1865
Preceded by
John J. Jones(1)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 8th congressional district

December 1, 1873November 4, 1882
Succeeded by
Seaborn Reese
Preceded by
Alfred H. Colquitt
Governor of Georgia
18821883
Succeeded by
James S. Boynton
Notes & References
1. Because of Georgia's secession, the House seat was vacant for over twelve years before Stephens succeeded Jones.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alexander Hamilton Stephens Biography (1964 words)
Stephens fully approved the peace policy proposed by the Confederate government, which was manifested by sending commissioners to Washington without delay Astounded by the treatment these eminent gentlemen received, he vigorously denounced the duplicity of Mr.
Stephens favored a vigorous prosecution of all diplomatic measures, and an active military preparation by the Confederacy.
Stephens began to press with some vehemence upon the administration at Richmond his views as to measures designed to end the carnage of battle.
Alexander Stephens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1220 words)
Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.
Stephens was born near Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia.
Stephens was elected Governor of Georgia in 1882 and served until his death in Atlanta.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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