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Encyclopedia > Alexander Calder
Alexander Calder

Alexander Calder
Birth name Alexander Calder
Born July 22, 1898(1898-07-22)
Lawnton, Pennsylvania
Died November 11, 1976 (aged 78)
New York, NY
Nationality United States
Field Sculpture
Training Stevens Institute of Technology, Art Students League of New York
Movement Kinetic Sculpture

Alexander Calder (July 22, 1898November 11, 1976), also known as Sandy Calder, was an American sculptor and artist most famous for inventing the mobile. In addition to mobile and stabile sculpture, Alexander Calder also created paintings, lithographs, toys and tapestry and designed carpets. Alexander Calder can refer to: Alexander Calder (1898 - 1976), American sculptor and inventor of the mobile sculpture. ... Alexander Calder, the creator of kinetic sculptures CREDIT: Van Vechten, Carl, photographer. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Lawnton is a census-designated place located in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the state. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Stevens Institute of Technology is a technological university located on a 55 acre (223,000 m²) campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, founded in 1870 on the basis of an 1868 bequest from Edwin A. Stevens. ... The Art Students League of New York is an art school founded in 1875. ... Kinetic sculptures are sculptures that are designed to move. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... A simple modern mobile in the style of Alexander Calder A mobile is a type of kinetic sculpture constructed to take advantage of the principle of equilibrium. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Lithography is a method for printing on a smooth surface. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... For other uses, see Carpet (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Childhood

Born in Lawnton, Pennsylvania, on July 22, 1898, Calder came from a family of artists. His father, Alexander Stirling Calder, was a well-known sculptor who created many public installations, a majority of them located in Philadelphia. Calder’s grandfather, sculptor Alexander Milne Calder, was born in Scotland and immigrated to Philadelphia in 1868. Calder’s mother, Nanette Lederer Calder, was a professional portrait painter who studied at the Académie Julian and the Sorbonne in Paris from around 1888 until 1893. She then moved to Philadelphia where she met Alexander Stirling Calder while studying at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.[1] Calder’s parents were married on February 22, 1895. His older sister, Margaret “Peggy” Calder, was born in 1896. Her married name was Margaret Calder Hayes, and she was instrumental in the development of the UC Berkeley Art Museum.[2] Lawnton is a census-designated place located in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. ... Swann Memorial Fountain, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania // Biography Alexander Stirling Calder (January 11, 1870 – 1945) was an American sculptor, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Alexander Milne Calder (1846 – 1923) Biography American sculptor, born in Aberdeen, Scotland, the son of a tombstone carver. ... This article is about the country. ... The Académie Julian was an art school in Paris, France. ... Inscription over the entrance to the Sorbonne The front of the Sorbonne Building The name Sorbonne (La Sorbonne) is commonly used to refer to the historic University of Paris in Paris, France or one of its successor institutions (see below), but this is a recent usage, and Sorbonne has actually... The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts was founded in 1805 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by painter and scientist Charles Willson Peale, sculptor William Rush, and other artists and business leaders. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1902, at the age of four, Calder posed nude for his father’s sculpture The Man Cub that is now located in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In that same year, he completed his earliest sculpture, a clay elephant.[3] Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ...


Three years later, when Calder was seven and his sister was nine, Stirling Calder contracted tuberculosis and Calder’s parents moved to a ranch in Oracle, Arizona, leaving the children in the care of family friends for a year.[4] The children were reunited with their parents in late March, 1906 and stayed at the ranch in Arizona until fall of the same year.[5] Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Oracle is a census-designated place located in Pinal County, Arizona. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


After Arizona, the Calder family moved to Pasadena, California. The windowed cellar of the family home became Calder’s first studio and he received his first set of tools. He used scraps of copper wire that he found in the streets to make jewelry and beads for his sister’s dolls. On January 1, 1907, Calder’s mother took him to the Tournament of Roses and he observed a four-horse-chariot race. This style of event later became the finale of Calder’s wire circus shows.[6]


In 1909, when Calder was in the fourth grade, he sculpted a dog and a duck out of sheet brass as Christmas gifts for his parents. The sculptures were three dimensional and the duck was kinetic because it rocked when gently tapped. These sculptures are frequently cited as early examples of Calder’s skill.[7]


In 1910, Stirling Calder’s rehabilitation was complete and the Calder family moved back to Philadelphia, where he briefly attended the Germantown Academy, and then to Croton-on-Hudson in New York.[8] In Croton, during his early high school years, Calder was befriended by the painter Everett Shinn with whom he built a gravity powered system of mechanical trains. As Calder described: Germantown Academy is Americas oldest nonsectarian day school, founded on December 6, 1759 (originally named the Germantown Union School). Germantown Academy (also referred to as GA) is now a K-12 school in the Fort Washington suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, having moved from its original Germantown campus in... Croton-on-Hudson is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... Everett Shinn (born November 6, 1876, Woodstown, New Jersey; died May 1, 1953, New York City) was an American realist painter and member of the Ashcan School, also known as the Eight. ...

We ran the train on wooden rails held by spikes; a chunk of iron racing down the incline speeded the cars. We even lit up some cars with candle lights.[9]

After Croton, the Calders moved to Spuyten Duyvil to be closer to the Tenth Street Studio Building in New York, where Stirling Calder rented a studio. While living in Spuyten Duyvil, Calder attended Yonkers High. Spuyten Duyvil Creek, also known as the Harlem River Ship Canal, is a one-mile-long channel connecting the Hudson and Harlem Rivers in New York City, separating the island of Manhattan from the mainland. ... Yonkers Public Schools is a school district that serves all of Yonkers, New York. ...


In 1912, Stirling Calder was appointed acting chief of the Department of Sculpture of the Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco.[10] He began work on sculptures for the exposition that was held in 1915. During Alexander Calder’s high school years between 1912 and 1915, the Calder family moved back and forth between New York and California. In each new location Calder’s parents reserved cellar space as a studio for their son. Toward the end of this period, Calder stayed with friends in California while his parents moved back to New York so that he could graduate from Lowell High School in San Francisco. Calder graduated in the class of 1915. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Lowell High School (San Francisco) Lowell High School, a public magnet school in San Francisco, is the oldest public high school west of the Mississippi. ...


Early years

Although Calder’s parents encouraged his creativity as a child, they discouraged their children from becoming artists, knowing that it was an uncertain and financially difficult career. In 1915, Calder decided to study mechanical engineering after learning about the discipline from a classmate at Lowell High School named Hyde Lewis. Stirling Calder arranged for his son's enrollment at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. During his freshman year, Calder stayed in Castle Stevens, a 40-room Victorian mansion that was originally a summer home of the Stevens family. In 1959, Castle Stevens was demolished and replaced in 1962 by the 14-story Wesley J. Howe Administration Building. Stevens Institute of Technology is a technological university located on a 55 acre (223,000 m²) campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, founded in 1870 on the basis of an 1868 bequest from Edwin A. Stevens. ... Hoboken is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

It was a beautiful room in a square tower, really a wonderful room, with windows looking up and down the river and across—it was all windows.[11]

Calder joined the football team during his freshman year at Stevens and practiced with the team all four years, but he never played in a game. He also played lacrosse, at which he was more successful. He was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He excelled in the subject of mathematics. Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ...


In the summer of 1916, Calder spent five weeks training at the Plattsburg Civilian Military Training Camp. In 1917, he joined the Student’s Army Training Corps, Naval Section, at Stevens and was made guide of the battalion.

Red Mobile, 1956. Painted sheet metal and metal rods, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.
Red Mobile, 1956. Painted sheet metal and metal rods, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.
I learned to talk out of the side of my mouth and have never been quite able to correct it since.[12]

Calder received a degree from Stevens in 1919. For the next several years, he worked a variety of engineering jobs, including working as a hydraulics engineer and a draughtsman for the New York Edison Company, but he was not content in any of the roles. Red Mobile, by Alexander Calder. ... Red Mobile, by Alexander Calder. ... The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (French : Musée Des Beaux-arts De Montréal) is a major Museum in Montreal, Canada. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


In June 1922, Calder started work as a fireman in the boiler room of the passenger ship H. F. Alexander. While the ship sailed from San Francisco to New York City, Calder woke on deck off the Guatemalan Coast and witnessed both the sun rising and the moon setting on opposite horizons. As he described in his autobiography: Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the country in Central America. ...

It was early one morning on a calm sea, off Guatemala, when over my couch — a coil of rope — I saw the beginning of a fiery red sunrise on one side and the moon looking like a silver coin on the other.

The H.F. Alexander docked in San Francisco and Calder traveled up to Aberdeen, Washington where his sister lived with her husband, Kenneth Hayes. Calder took a job as a timekeeper at a logging camp. The mountain scenery inspired him to write home to request paints and brushes. Shortly after this, Calder decided to move back to New York to pursue a career as an artist.


Art career

Having decided to become an artist, Calder moved to New York and enrolled at the Art Students' League. While a student, he worked for the National Police Gazette where, in 1925, one of his assignments was sketching the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus. Calder became fascinated with the circus, a theme that would reappear in his later work. The Art Students League of New York is an art school founded in 1875. ... Ringling Bros. ...


In 1926, Calder moved to Paris. He established a studio at 22 rue Daguerre. At the suggestion of a Serbian toy merchant, he began to create toys with articulation. He never found the toy merchant again, but, at the urging of fellow sculptor Jose de Creeft, he submitted his toys to the Salon des Humoristes. Later that fall, Calder began to create his Cirque Calder, a miniature circus fashioned from wire, string, rubber, cloth, and other found objects. Designed to fit into suitcases (it eventually grew to fill five), Calder could travel with his circus and hold performances on both sides of the Atlantic. He gave elaborately improvised shows, recreating the performance of a real circus. Soon, his "Cirque Calder"[1][2] (now on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art) became popular with the Parisian avant-garde. Some months Calder would charge an entrance fee to pay his rent.[3][4] This article is about the capital of France. ... Cirque Calder is an artistic rendering of a circus created by the American artist Alexander Calder. ... Cirque Calder is an artistic rendering of a circus created by the American artist Alexander Calder. ... Night view of Whitney Museum of American Art The Whitney Museum of American Art is an art gallery and museum in New York City founded in 1931 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. ...

Man, a "stabile" by Alexander Calder; Terre des Hommes (Expo 67 fairground), Saint Helen's Island, Montreal.
Man, a "stabile" by Alexander Calder; Terre des Hommes (Expo 67 fairground), Saint Helen's Island, Montreal.

In 1927, Calder returned to the United States. He designed several kinetic wooden push and pull toys for children, which he had mass-produced by the Gould Manufacturing Company, in Oshkosh, WI. His originals, as well as playable replicas, are on display in the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Man by Alexander Calder, Île Sainte-Hélène, Montreal. ... Man by Alexander Calder, Île Sainte-Hélène, Montreal. ... Photograph of a nude man by Wilhelm von Gloeden, ca. ... Man, a sculpture by Alexander Calder, on Saint Helens Island Saint Helens Island (French ÃŽle Sainte-Hélène [1]) (, ) is an island in the Saint Lawrence River, in the territory of the city of Montreal. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... The Berkshire Museum is a local museum in Pittsfield, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA. From 1903, the Berkshire Athenaeum was responsible for the museum, which was founded by Zenas Crane, the grandson of the founder of Crane & Company, in the same year. ... Pittsfield redirects here. ...


In 1928, Calder held his first solo show at a commercial gallery at the Weyhe Gallery in New York City. In 1934, he had his first solo museum exhibition in the United States at The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago. Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Renaissance Society is a non-collecting museum founded in 1915 to encourage the growth and understanding of contemporary art. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ...


In 1929, Calder had his first solo show of wire sculpture in Paris at Galerie Billiet. The painter Jules Pascin, a friend of Calder's from the cafes of Montparnasse, wrote the preface. Julius Mordecai Pincas, (March 31, 1885 - June 5, 1930) aka Pascin, The Prince of Montparnasse, was a Jewish - Bulgarian painter. ... The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built. ...


In June of 1929, while traveling from Paris to New York, Calder met his future wife, Louisa James, grandniece of author Henry James and philosopher William James. They married in 1931. For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


While in Paris, Calder met and became friends with a number of avant-garde artists, including Joan Miró, Jean Arp, and Marcel Duchamp. A visit to Piet Mondrian's studio in 1930 "shocked" him into embracing abstract art. Joan Miró i Ferrà (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was a Catalan (Spanish) painter, sculptor, and ceramist born in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain to the family of a goldsmith and watchmaker. ... Hans (Jean) Arp (September 16, 1886 – June 7, 1966) was a German-French sculptor, painter, and poet. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... Piet Mondrian, 1924 Pieter Cornelis (Piet) Mondriaan, after 1912 Mondrian, (pronounced: Dutch IPA: , later IPA: ), (March 7, 1872, Amersfoort, Netherlands – February 1, 1944, New York City) was a Dutch painter. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kazimir Malevich, Black square 1915 Abstract art is now generally understood to mean art that does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses color and form in a non-representational way. ...


The Cirque Calder can be seen as the start of Calder's interest in both wire sculpture and kinetic art. He maintained a sharp eye with respect to the engineering balance of the sculptures and utilized these to develop the kinetic sculptures Duchamp would ultimately dub as "mobiles". He designed some of the characters in the circus to perform suspended from a thread. However, it was the mixture of his experiments to develop purely abstract sculpture following his visit with Mondrian that lead to his first truly kinetic sculptures, manipulated by means of cranks and pulleys. Cirque Calder is an artistic rendering of a circus created by the American artist Alexander Calder. ... Wire sculpture jewelry Wire sculpture refers to the creation of sculpture or jewellery (sometimes called wire wrap jewellery) out of wire. ... The Tinguely Fountain in front of the Tinguely Museum in Basel Kinetic art is sculpture that contains moving parts. ... A simple modern mobile in the style of Alexander Calder A mobile is a type of kinetic sculpture constructed to take advantage of the principle of equilibrium. ... Piet Mondrian, 1924 Pieter Cornelis (Piet) Mondriaan, after 1912 Mondrian, (pronounced: Dutch IPA: , later IPA: ), (March 7, 1872, Amersfoort, Netherlands – February 1, 1944, New York City) was a Dutch painter. ...


By the end of 1931, he had quickly moved on to more delicate sculptures which derived their motion from the air currents in the room. From this, Calder's true "mobiles" were born. At the same time, Calder was also experimenting with self-supporting, static, abstract sculptures, dubbed "stabiles" by Arp to differentiate them from mobiles. Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean Arp (September 16, 1886 - June 7, 1966) was a sculptor, painter, and poet. ...


Calder and Louisa returned to America in 1933 to settle in a farmhouse they purchased in Roxbury, Connecticut, where they raised a family (first daughter, Sandra born 1935, second daughter, Mary, in 1939). Calder continued to give "Cirque Calder" performances but also worked with Martha Graham, designing stage sets for her ballets and created a moving stage construction to accompany Eric Satie's Socrate in 1936. Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roxbury is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cirque Calder is an artistic rendering of a circus created by the American artist Alexander Calder. ... For the supercentenarian, see Martha Graham (supercentenarian). ... Eric Alfred Leslie Satie (born Honfleur, 17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925 in Paris) was a French composer, performing pianist and publicist. ... Socrate is a work for voice and small orchestra (or piano) by Erik Satie. ...


His first public commission was a pair of mobiles designed for the theater opened in 1937 in the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The Berkshire Museum is a local museum in Pittsfield, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA. From 1903, the Berkshire Athenaeum was responsible for the museum, which was founded by Zenas Crane, the grandson of the founder of Crane & Company, in the same year. ... Pittsfield redirects here. ...


During World War II, Calder attempted to join the Marines as a camofleur, but was rejected. Instead, he continued to sculpt, but a scarcity of metal lead to him producing work in carved wood. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Carved wooden cranes Wood carving is a form of working wood by means of a cutting tool held in the hand (this may be a power tool), resulting in a wooden figure or figurine (this may be abstract in nature) or in the ornamentation of a wooden object. ...


Calder's first retrospective was held in 1938 at George Walter Vincent Smith Gallery in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1943, the Museum of Modern Art hosted a well-received Calder retrospective, curated by James Johnson Sweeney and Marcel Duchamp. Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... James Johnson Sweeney (1900–1986) was the second director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, from 1952-1960. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the...


Calder was one of 250 sculptors who exhibited in the 3rd Sculpture International held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the summer of 1949. His mobile, International Mobile was the centerpiece of the exhibition and hangs in 2006 where it was placed in 1949. 3rd Sculpture International was an exhibition of sculpture that included works from 250 sculptors from around the world. ... The Philadelphia Museum of Art, located at the west end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphias Fairmount Park, was established in 1876 in conjunction with the Centennial Exposition of the same year and is now among the largest and most important art museums in the United States. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the 1950s, Calder increasingly concentrated his efforts on producing monumental sculptures. Notable examples are ".125" for JFK Airport in 1957 and "La Spirale" for UNESCO in Paris 1958. Calder's largest sculpture, at 20.5 m high, was "El Sol Rojo", constructed for the Olympic games in Mexico City. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA Airport Code: JFK, ICAO Airport Code: KJFK) is the main international airport in New York City, and is one of the largest airports in the world. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Jan. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ...

Alexander Calder, The Crab, painted steel, 1962, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Alexander Calder, The Crab, painted steel, 1962, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

In 1966, Calder published his Autobiography with Pictures with the help of his son-in-law, Jean Davidson. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH), located in Houston, is the largest art museum in Texas, USA, and the largest art museum in the USA east of Los Angeles, south of Chicago, and west of Washington. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


In June 1969, Calder attended the dedication of his monumental stabile “La Grande Vitesse” located in the city of Grand Rapids, Michigan. This sculpture is notable for being the first public work of art in the United States to be funded with federal monies; acquired with funds granted from the then new National Endowment for the Arts under its “Art for Public Places” program. Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Grand Rapids redirects here. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ...


Calder created a sculpture called WTC Stabile (also known as The Cockeyed Propeller and Three Wings), which in 1971 was installed at the entrance of the World Trade Center's North Tower. When Battery Park City opened, the sculpture was moved to Vesey and Church Streets.[13] It stood in front of 7 World Trade Center when it was destroyed on September 11, 2001.[14] For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... Battery Park City is a 90 acre (0. ... 7 World Trade Center is a building in New York City located across from the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...


In 1973, Calder was commissioned by Braniff International Airways to paint a full-size DC-8-62 as a "flying canvas", In 1975, Calder completed a second plane, this time a Boeing 727-227, as a tribute to the U.S. Bicentennial. For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Braniff International Airways was an American airline that existed from 1928 until 1982. ... The Douglas DC-8 is a four-engined jet airliner, manufactured from 1958 to 1972. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boeing 727 is a mid-size, narrow-body, three-engine commercial jet airliner. ... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. ...


Calder died on November 11, 1976, shortly following the opening of another major retrospective show at the Whitney Museum in New York. Calder had been working on a third plane, entitled Tribute to Mexico, when he died. is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Night view of Whitney Museum of American Art The Whitney Museum of American Art is an art gallery and museum in New York City founded in 1931 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. ...


On January 10, 1977, Calder was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian honor, by President Gerald Ford. Representatives of the Calder family reportedly boycotted the ceremony to make a statement favoring amnesty for Vietnam War draft resisters.[citation needed] is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...

Reporter: How do you know when its time to stop [working]?
Calder: When it's suppertime.
- From a television interview

Selected works

Untitled gouache on paper by Alexander Calder, 1967, Honolulu Academy of Arts
Untitled gouache on paper by Alexander Calder, 1967, Honolulu Academy of Arts
  • Dog (1909), folded brass sheet; this was made as a present for Calder's parents
  • The Flying Trapeze (1925), oil on canvas, 36 x 42 in.
  • Elephant (c. 1928), wire and wood, 11 1/2 x 5 3/4 x 29.2 in.
  • Aztec Josephine Baker (c. 1929), wire, 53" x 10" x 9". A representation of Josephine Baker, the exuberant lead dancer from La Révue Nègre at the Folies Bergère.
  • Untitled (1931), wire, wood and motor; one of the first kinetic mobiles.
  • Feathers (1931), wire, wood and paint; first true mobile, although designed to stand on a desktop
  • Cone d'ebene (1933), ebony, metal bar and wire; early suspended mobile (first was made in 1932).
  • Form Against Yellow (1936), sheet metal, wire, plywood, string and paint; wall- supported mobile.
  • Devil Fish (1937), sheet metal, bolts and paint; first piece made from a model.
  • 1939 New York World's Fair (maquette) (1938), sheet metal, wire, wood, string and paint
  • Necklace (c. 1938), brass wire, glass and mirror
  • Sphere Pierced by Cylinders (1939), wire and paint [5]; the first of many floor standing, life size stabiles (predating Anthony Caro's plinthless sculptures by two decades)
  • Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1939), sheet metal, wire and paint (suspended mobile); design for the stairwell of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • Black Beast (1940), sheet metal, bolts and paint; freestanding plinthless stabile)
  • S-Shaped Vine (1946), sheet metal, wire and paint (suspended mobile)
  • Sword Plant (1947) sheet metal, wire and paint (Standing Mobile)
  • Snow Flurry (1948), sheet metal, wire and paint (suspended mobile)
  • .125 (1957), steel plate, rods and paint
  • La Spirale (1958), steel plate, rod and paint, 360" high; public monumental mobile for Maison de l'U.N.E.S.C.O., Paris
  • Teodelapio (1962), steel plate and paint, monumental stabile, Spoleto, Italy
  • Man (1967) stainless steel plate, bolts and paint, 65' x 83' x 53', monumental stabile, Montreal Canada

The Honolulu Academy of Arts is a fine art museum located near downtown Honolulu, Hawaii. ... The Honolulu Academy of Arts is a fine art museum located near downtown Honolulu, Hawaii. ... For the first female director of Public Health, see Sara Josephine Baker. ... The Folies Bergère is a Parisian music hall which was at the height of its fame and popularity from the 1890s through the 1920s. ... The Honolulu Academy of Arts is a fine art museum located near downtown Honolulu, Hawaii. ... Alexander Calders Mercury Fountain in the sculpture garden of the Fundació Joan Miró The Mercury Fountain is a type of fountain constructed for use with mercury rather than water. ... Sir Anthony Caro, OM, CBE, (born 8 March 1924 in New Malden, Surrey) is an English, abstract sculptor whose work is characterised by assemblies of metal using found industrial objects. ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... Spoleto (Latin: Spoletium), 42°44′ N 12°44′ E, an ancient town in the Italian province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 385 meters (1391 ft) above sea-level on a foothill of the Apennines. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Grand Rapids redirects here. ... The Olympic Sculpture Park is a public park in Seattle, Washington that opened on January 20, 2007. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... The Honolulu Academy of Arts is a fine art museum located near downtown Honolulu, Hawaii. ... The Wadsworth Atheneum is the oldest public art museum in the United States and largest in the state of Connecticut. ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The vivid color and fluid motion of Flamingo contrast the rectangular, dark forms of its surroundings. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... The statues Faribolus and Perceval, by Jean Dubuffet, stand at the entrance to the center. ... The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for... Mountains and Clouds Mountains and Clouds is the name of a sculpture by Alexander Calder that is located in the Hart Senate Office Building. ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ...

See also

California The Hawk for Peace, 1968, Berkeley Art Museum, University of California at Berkeley Bucephalus, Saroyan Theatre, Fresno Three Quintains, 1964, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles Four Arches, 1974, Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles Spinal Column, 1968, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego Le Faucon (The...

Bibliography

  • Calder, Alexander. An Autobiography With Pictures. HarperCollins, ISBN 0-06-853268-7.
  • Guerrero, Pedro E. Calder at Home. The Joyous Environment of Alexander Calder. Stewart, Tabori & Chang, New York, 1998, ISBN 1556706553
  • Prather, Marla. Alexander Calder 1898 - 1976. National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1998, ISBN 0894682288, ISBN 0300075189

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.herbertpalmergallery.com/main_pages/artists/calder_nanette_bio.html
  2. ^ Hayes, Margaret Calder, Three Alexander Calders: A Family Memoir. Middlebury, VT: Paul S Eriksson, 1977.
  3. ^ Calder, Alexander and Davidson, Jean, Calder, An Autobiography with Pictures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1966, p. 13.
  4. ^ See website (Wikipedia blacklisted URL)—www.suite101.com/article.cfm/american_artists/81069
  5. ^ http://www.calder.org/
  6. ^ Calder, Alexander and Davidson, Jean, Calder, An Autobiography with Pictures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1966, pp. 21-22.
  7. ^ http://www.sfmoma.org/espace/calder/calder_childhood.html
  8. ^ http://www.sfmoma.org/espace/calder/calder_childhood.html
  9. ^ Calder, Alexander and Davidson, Jean, Calder, An Autobiography with Pictures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1966, p. 31.
  10. ^ http://calder.org/chronology/period/1898-1930/10
  11. ^ Calder, Alexander and Davidson, Jean, Calder, An Autobiography with Pictures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1966, p. 39.
  12. ^ Calder, Alexander and Davidson, Jean, Calder, An Autobiography with Pictures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1966, p. 47.
  13. ^ Wenegrat, Saul. "Public Art at the World Trade Center", International Foundation for Art Research, February 28, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-07-27. 
  14. ^ Lives and Treasures Taken, The Library of Congress Retrieved 27 July, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Alexander Calder Lithographs, Etchings, Prints & Artwork signed by Alexander Calder (1595 words)
Alexander Calder was born July 22, 1898, in Lawnton, Pennsylvania, into a family of artists--his father was a sculptor and his mother a painter.
Calder was encouraged to create, and from the age of eight he always had his own workshop wherever* the family lived.
Alexander Calder found he enjoyed working with wire for his circus: he soon began to sculpt from this material portraits of his friends and public figures of the day.
Alexander Calder - Biography (446 words)
Alexander Calder, internationally famous by his mid-30s, is renowned for developing a new idiom in modern art-the mobile.
Calder was born in 1898 in Philadelphia, the son of Alexander Stirling Calder and grandson of Alexander Milne Calder, both well-known sculptors.
Calder created a miniature circus in his studio; the animals, clowns and tumblers were made of wire and animated by hand.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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