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Encyclopedia > Alex Salmond
The Rt Hon Alex Salmond MP MSP

Incumbent
Assumed office 
16 May 2007
Deputy Nicola Sturgeon (2007-)
Preceded by Jack McConnell
Succeeded by Incumbent

Incumbent
Assumed office 
September 3, 2004(2004-09-03)
Preceded by John Swinney
Succeeded by Incumbent
In office
September 22, 1990(1990-09-22) – September 26, 2000(2000-09-26)
Preceded by Gordon Wilson
Succeeded by John Swinney

Incumbent
Assumed office 
June 11, 1987(1987-06-11)
Preceded by Albert McQuarrie
Majority 11,837 (31.8%)

Member of the Scottish Parliament
for Gordon
Banff and Buchan (1999-2003)
Incumbent
Assumed office 
May 3, 2007(2007-05-03)
Preceded by Nora Radcliffe
Majority 2,062 (5.8%)

Born 31 December 1954 (1954-12-31) (age 52)
Linlithgow, Scotland
Political party Scottish National Party
Website http://www.snp.org/people/alex

Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born December 31, 1954, Linlithgow), is a Scottish politician, and the current First Minister of Scotland, heading a minority government. The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... Nicola Sturgeon (born on 19 July 1970 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is the Deputy Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... Jack Wilson McConnell (born June 30, 1960 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is a former First Minister of Scotland, leader of the Scottish Labour Party and current Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) for the Motherwell and Wishaw constituency. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which favours Scottish independence. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Swinney John Swinney is the former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about Gordon Wilson the Scottish politician. ... John Swinney John Swinney is the former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Banff and Buchan is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Sir Albert McQuarrie (born 1 January 1918) was Conservative Party (UK) Member of Parliament for Aberdeenshire East from 1979 to 1983, and for Banff and Buchan from 1983 to 1987, when he lost his seat to future Scottish National Party leader Alex Salmond. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Gordon is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Banff and Buchan is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Nora Radcliffe (born 4 March 1946) is a Scottish Liberal Democrat politician, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Gordon, first elected in 1999. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Linlithgow town in the background, the Loch in the mid-ground with the Palace in the foreground Linlithgow (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Iucha, Scots Lithgae) is a town and Royal Burgh in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Linlithgow town in the background, the Loch in the mid-ground with the Palace in the foreground Linlithgow (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Iucha, Scots Lithgae) is a town and Royal Burgh in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ; Scots: ) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotlands national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. ... This article is about the country. ... For minority governments in general, see dominant minority. ...


He is leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP), Member of Parliament for the constituency of Banff and Buchan, and the Member of the Scottish Parliament for Gordon. The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament at the House of Commons in Westminster representing constituencies in Scotland, arranged by party. ... Scotland is divided into 59 constituencies of the United Kingdom Parliament - 19 Burgh constituencies and 40 County constituencies. ... Banff and Buchan is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... Gordon is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ...


He is currently serving his second term as leader of the SNP, taking over from John Swinney. He had previously been leader between 1990 and 2000. John Swinney John Swinney is the former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ...


The SNP won by the smallest of margins (47 seats, 1 more than the Scottish Labour Party) in the 2007 Scottish Parliament election. On 16 May 2007, Alex Salmond was nominated to become First Minister, heading a minority SNP administration, by 49 votes to 46. The Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives abstained. The Greens supported him.[1] This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... The Scottish Parliament election, 2007, will be the third general election since the Scottish Parliament was created in 1999. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political parties in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ...

Contents

Education and career before politics

Born in Linlithgow, West Lothian, Salmond is the son of Robert Fyfe Findlay Salmond and Mary Stewart Salmond (nee Milne), both of whom were civil servants. Salmond attended Linlithgow Academy [1] and the University of St Andrews, where he graduated with an MA in Economics and History. He was first employed as an assistant economist in the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries for Scotland from 1978. Linlithgow town in the background, the Loch in the mid-ground with the Palace in the foreground Linlithgow (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Iucha, Scots Lithgae) is a town and Royal Burgh in Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 20th  - Total 427 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Livingston ISO 3166-2 GB-WLN ONS code 00RH Demographics Population Ranked 10th  - Total (2005) 163,780  - Density 384 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics West Lothian Council http://www. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... A Master of Arts in Scotland is an academic degree in humanities and social sciences awarded by the four ancient universities of Scotland, the University of Dundee and also Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ...


In 1980, he joined the Royal Bank of Scotland, for which he worked until 1987, first as an assistant economist, then as the Oil Economist and latterly as Royal Bank Economist. While with the Royal Bank, he wrote and broadcast extensively for both domestic and international outlets. He also contributed regularly to oil and energy conferences. In 1983 he devised the “Royal Bank / BBC Oil Index”, which continues monthly publication to this day. The Royal Bank of Scotland Plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the United Kingdom. ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Lubbock, Texas Ignacy Łukasiewicz - inventor of the refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Early political career

Salmond became active in the SNP when he joined the Federation of Student Nationalists at St Andrews University in 1973 while a student at St Andrews. As a left-winger at the time he joined, he had considerable doubts as to whether or not the Labour Party would legislate for a devolved Scottish Assembly. The Federation of Student Nationalists, known in the shortened form as the FSN, was formed in the 1960s when various student organisations supportive of the notion of Scottish independence and the Scottish National Party (SNP) in particular decided to join forces into a new constituent body. ... University of St Andrews The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410-1413 and is the oldest university in Scotland and the third oldest in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see St Andrews (disambiguation). ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Look up Devolution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A devolved Scottish Assembly that would have some form of legislative powers in jurisdiction over Scotland was a long-held political priority for many individuals and organisations. ...


Expulsion and re-admission

Salmond started his political life as a committed left-winger inside the SNP and was a leading member of the socialist republican organisation within it, the 79 Group. He was, along with other group leaders, suspended from membership of the SNP when the 79 Group was banned within the larger party. In 1981, he married Moira French McGlashan (born 1937), a senior civil servant with the Scottish Office. Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Republicanism is the ideology of governing a nation as a republic, with an emphasis on liberty, rule by the people, and the civic virtue practiced by citizens. ... The 79 Group was an internal faction within the UK General Election. ... Categories: Stub | Scotland | Departments of the United Kingdom Government ...


Following the SNP's National Council narrowly voting to uphold the expulsion, Salmond and the others were allowed back into the party a month later, and in 1985 he was elected as the SNP's Vice Convener for Publicity.


First time at Westminster

In 1987 he was elected Member of Parliament for Banff and Buchan, Scotland, and later that year became Senior Vice Convener (Deputy Leader) of the SNP. He was at this time still viewed as being firmly on the left of the party and had become a key ally of Jim Sillars, who joined him in the British House of Commons when he won a by-election for the seat of Glasgow Govan in 1988. Salmond served as a member of the House of Commons Energy Select Committee from 1987 to 1992. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Banff and Buchan is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Jim Sillars was born on 4 October 1937 in Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... The Glasgow Govan by-election was held on November 10, 1988. ... Glasgow Govan was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until 2005. ... A Select Committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster System of parliamentary democracy. ...


First time as SNP leader

When Gordon Wilson stood down as SNP leader in 1990, Salmond decided to contest the leadership. His only opponent was Margaret Ewing, whom Sillars decided to support. This caused considerable consternation amongst the SNP left as the two main left leaders were opposing each other in the contest. It was also around this time that Salmond and Sillars drifted apart. Salmond went on to win the leadership election by 486 votes to Ewing's 146. This article is about Gordon Wilson the Scottish politician. ... Margaret Ewing Margaret Ewing was born Margaret Anne McAdam on 1 September 1945 was a Scottish National Party MSP. She attended the University of Glasgow and the University of Strathclyde and was a teacher before becoming an MP for East Dunbartonshire at the February 1974 Election, by just 22 votes. ...


His first test as leader was the United Kingdom general election in 1992, with the SNP having high hopes of making an electoral breakthrough. However the party, whilst considerably increasing its vote, failed to win a large number of seats; Sillars lost his, causing him to describe the Scottish people as '90 minute patriots'. This comment ended the political friendship between Salmond and Sillars, and Sillars would soon become a vocal critic of Salmond's style of leadership. The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992. ...


Devolution

The SNP increased its number of MPs from four to six in the 1997 General Election, which saw a landslide victory for the Labour Party. After election, Labour legislated for a devolved Scottish parliament in Edinburgh. The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ... The Scotland Act 1998 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom at Westminster. ... A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. ...


Although still committed to a fully independent Scotland, Salmond signed the SNP up to supporting the campaign for devolution, and along with Scottish Labour leader Donald Dewar played an active part in securing the victory for devolution in the Scotland referendum of 1997. However, many hard line fundamentalists in the SNP objected to committing the party to devolution, as it was short of full political Scottish independence. For the Canadian politician, see Donald Dewar (Canadian politician). ... The Scotland referendum of 1997 was a pre-legislative referendum held in Scotland only, over whether there was support for the creation of an assembly for Scotland and whether there was support for an assembly with tax varying powers. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The fundamentalist ideology within the Scottish National Party (SNP) is the belief that the SNP should emphasise its policy of Scottish independence more widely in order to achieve it. ... Scottish independence is a political ambition of a number of political parties, pressure groups and individuals within and outside of Scotland. ...


Salmond's first spell as leader was characterised by a moderation of his earlier left-wing views and by his firmly placing the SNP into a gradualist, but still pro-independence, strategy. The gradualist viewpoint within the Scottish National Party (SNP) is the idea that Scottish independence can be won by the accumulation by the Scottish Parliament of powers that the UK Parliament currently has over a protracted period of time. ...


Kosovo

Salmond was one of the few British politicians to oppose the NATO bombing of Serbia in 1999[2]. He was opposed to the conflict because it was not authorised by a United Nations Security Council resolution, which was a controversial subject at the time. Despite this, Salmond was heavily criticised in the media for describing Tony Blair's decision to intervene militarily as an "unpardonable folly" [3]. This article is about the military alliance. ... Combatants NATO (USAF, RAF, and other air, maritime and land forces) Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and allied Serb paramilitary and foreign volunteer forces[1] Commanders Wesley Clark (SACEUR), Javier Solana (Secretary General of NATO) Slobodan Milošević (Supreme Commander of the Yugoslav Army), Vojislav Šešelj, Dragoljub Ojdanić (Chief of... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... “Security Council” redirects here. ... A United Nations Security Council Resolution is voted on by the fifteen members of the UN Security Council. ... The NATO bombing of Yugoslavia took place during the Kosovo War. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


High media profile

Several years as party leader earned Salmond an unusually high profile for an SNP politician in the London-based media. In 1998, Salmond won the Spectator Award for Political strategist of the Year. Salmond has taken part in entertainment programmes such as Have I Got News For You and Call My Bluff. His appearances on the latter, and more specifically the fact that he held on to one of the famous 'bluff' cards that are used as props in the show as a souvenir, proved to have an unexpected significance in the run-up to the first elections to the Scottish Parliament. To counter his frustration at having to sit in silence through what he claimed was an inappropriately political speech by Tony Blair at a charity lunch, he held up the bluff card as the Prime Minister began querying Scotland's economic prospects should independence occur. [4] Throughout his time in politics, Salmond has maintained his interest in horse racing, previously writing a weekly column for The Scotsman and appearing a number of times on Channel 4’s "The Morning Line". A stilt-walker entertaining shoppers at a shopping centre in Swindon, England Entertainment is an event, performance, or activity designed to give pleasure or relaxation to an audience (although, for example, in the case of a computer game the audience may be only one person). ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... Call My Bluff is a British game show between two teams of three contestants. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... This article is about the British television station. ...


Resignation and time in Westminster

Salmond was elected to the Scottish Parliament in 1999 and was one of its highest profile members. He stood down as SNP leader in 2000, and was replaced by his preferred successor John Swinney, who defeated Alex Neil for the post. For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... John Swinney John Swinney is the former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... Alex Neil was born in 1951 in Patna, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ...


In 2001 he left the Scottish Parliament to lead the SNP group in the House of Commons. During the prolonged parliamentary debates in the run-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq he voiced strong opposition to Britain's participation. Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


In the aftermath of the war, he lent support to the attempt of Adam Price, a Plaid Cymru MP, to impeach Tony Blair over the Iraq issue. Salmond has gone further than many anti-war politicians in claiming that Blair's statements on the presence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq were consciously intended to deceive the public. Adam Robert Price (born September 23, 1968, Carmarthen) is a politician in Wales, and Plaid Cymru Member of Parliament for Carmarthen East and Dinefwr. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... UK Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... Iraqs Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Assessment of the British Government, also known as the September Dossier, was a document published by the United Kingdom Labour government on 24 September 2002 on the same day of a recall of Parliament to discuss the contents of the document. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ...


Return as leader

In a surprise announcement on 15 July 2004, Alex Salmond announced that he would be a candidate in the forthcoming election for the leadership of the SNP (which arose after John Swinney's resignation). Salmond had previously said that he would definitely not be a candidate in that election, even claiming in jest that if he were elected he would resign. In the postal ballot of all members he went on to receive over 75% of the votes cast, placing him well ahead of his nearest rival Roseanna Cunningham. [5] is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Swinney John Swinney is the former leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... In the United States, an absentee ballot is a ballot that the voter receives and (usually) sends through the mail, rather than travelling to a polling place and marking the ballot at a voting booth. ... Roseanna Cunningham Roseanna Cunningham is an Australian-born (July 27, 1951) British politician, and member for the Scottish National Party for Perth in the Scottish Parliament. ...


Although he was re-elected in the United Kingdom general election of 2005, he made clear his intention to return to the Scottish Parliament at the Scottish parliamentary election, 2007, at which point he would take over the role of SNP group leader in the Parliament from his deputy Nicola Sturgeon. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005, just over three weeks after the dissolution of Parliament on 11 April by Queen Elizabeth II, at the request of the Prime Minister, Tony Blair. ... The third elections to the Scottish Parliament will be held in May, 2007. ... Nicola Sturgeon (born on 19 July 1970 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is the Deputy Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ...


2007 election

Salmond stood as a candidate for the Gordon constituency, which had been won in the 1999 and 2003 elections by Liberal Democrat Nora Radcliffe[6]. Salmond defeated her with a margin of over two thousand votes, returning to the Scottish Parliament after six years' absence. Gordon is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Nora Radcliffe (born 4 March 1946) is a Scottish Liberal Democrat politician, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Gordon, first elected in 1999. ...


In the election on 3 May 2007, the SNP emerged as the largest party, winning 47 seats to Labour's 46. Following this close victory, Salmond's attempts to create a governing majority coalition with the Liberal Democrats and Scottish Green Party MSPs were unsuccessful, although the Greens agreed to support an SNP minority administration on finance and confidence issues. [7] is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


First Minister

As a result, Salmond was forced to form a minority government on a "policy by policy" basis. He was duly elected as the Scottish Parliament's nominee for First Minister on 16 May 2007, and was sworn in on 17 May [8]. He is the first nationalist politician to hold the office, following three Labour First Ministers: Donald Dewar, Henry McLeish and Jack McConnell. In order to concentrate on his new role as First Minister, Salmond stood down as the SNP group leader at Westminster and was replaced by Angus Robertson. is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... For the Canadian politician, see Donald Dewar (Canadian politician). ... Henry McLeish (born June 15, 1948) is a Scottish politician. ... Jack Wilson McConnell (born June 30, 1960 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is a former First Minister of Scotland, leader of the Scottish Labour Party and current Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) for the Motherwell and Wishaw constituency. ... Angus Robertson Angus Robertson, born 28 September 1969, Wimbledon, London, England, is a Scottish politician. ...


Following the decision of the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission (SCCRC) to refer the case of Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi back for a second appeal against conviction, Dr Hans Köchler, UN-appointed observer at the Lockerbie trial, wrote on July 4, 2007 to First Minister, Alex Salmond, reiterating his call for a full and independent public inquiry of the Lockerbie case.[9] The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission (SCCRC) is a non-departmental public body in Scotland and was established by the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (as amended by the Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Act 1997). ... The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission (SCCRC) is a non-departmental public body in Scotland and was established by the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (as amended by the Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Act 1997). ... Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi (born April 1, 1952) is a former Libyan intelligence officer, head of security for Libyan Arab Airlines, and director of the Center for Strategic Studies in Tripoli. ... Hans Köchler (born October 18, 1948 in Schwaz, Tyrol, Austria) is Full Professor of Philosophy and Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... The trial began on May 3, 2000 The Pan Am Flight 103 bombing trial began on May 3, 2000, which was 11 years, four months and 13 days after the sabotage of Pan Am Flight 103 on December 21, 1988. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... PA 103 redirects here. ...


Köchler addressed his letter also to Foreign Secretary, David Miliband, Home Secretary Jacqui Smith and to the Minister for Africa, Asia and the UN, Mark Malloch Brown.[10] David Wright Miliband (born 15 July 1965) is a British politician who is the current Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs [1] and Member of Parliament for the constituency of South Shields, Tyne and Wear. ... Jacqueline Jill Smith (born 3 November 1962) is a British politician who has been Home Secretary since 28 June 2007 and is the current Member of Parliament for Redditch, since 1997. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Sir Mark Malloch Brown KCMG (born 1953 in England), a British national, was briefly United Nations Deputy Secretary-General. ...


Controversy

Alex Salmond has shown support for billionaire Donald Trump to build his 'personal golfing paradise' on Menie Links in the north-east coast of Scotland [11]. Criticism of the project has been raised relating to effects on the environment, local wildlife and the construction of housing.[12]. Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946 in Queens, New York, New York) is an American business executive, entrepreneur, television and radio personality and author. ... Menie is an area of land just north of Balmedie, Aberdeenshire. ... This article is about the country. ...


In June, Salmond threw a dinner party at the First Minister's official residence, Bute House and was accused of using the event to gain support for his administration from high-profile individuals. The total cost to the tax-payer amounted to nearly £1,500[13]. Guests included businessman Brian Souter, who has been associated with some degree of controversy. Bute House is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, who is the head of the Scottish Executive, the countrys devolved government created in 1999. ... Brian Souter (born 1954 in Perth, Scotland), is a businessman and vile piece of scum, who was the co-founder of the Stagecoach Group, along with his sister, Ann Gloag. ... Brian Souter (born 1954 in Perth, Scotland), is a businessman and vile piece of scum, who was the co-founder of the Stagecoach Group, along with his sister, Ann Gloag. ...


References

  1. ^ Salmond elected as First Minister
  2. ^ http://www.siol-nan-gaidheal.com/kosovo.htm
  3. ^ BBC News, 29 March 1999
  4. ^ BBC News- "Salmond calls Blair's bluff"
  5. ^ Edinburgh News- "Salmond is SNP leader again with Sturgeon as No 2"
  6. ^ BBC News- "Salmond to contest Holyrood seat"
  7. ^ Scottish Green Party website
  8. ^ "Salmond officially first minister", BBC News, May 17, 2007
  9. ^ UN observer calls for fresh Lockerbie probe
  10. ^ Köchler calls for "full and independent public inquiry" of the Lockerbie case
  11. ^ Trump in the rough on a fairway to heaven
  12. ^ Trump golf plan 'all about homes'
  13. ^ Salmond's tab is hard to swallow

is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Alex Salmond
  • Alex Salmond MP official biography at the site of the SNP
  • Guardian Unlimited Politics - Ask Aristotle: Alex Salmond MP
  • TheyWorkForYou.com - Alex Salmond MP
  • The Public Whip - Alex Salmond MP
  • BBC News - Alex Salmond profile
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Albert McQuarrie
Member of Parliament for Banff and Buchan
1987 – present
Incumbent
Scottish Parliament
Preceded by
Constituency Created
Member of the Scottish Parliament for Banff and Buchan
1999–2001
Succeeded by
Stewart Stevenson
Preceded by
Nora Radcliffe
Member of the Scottish Parliament for Gordon
2007 – present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Gordon Wilson
Leader of the Scottish National Party
1990–2000
Succeeded by
John Swinney
Preceded by
John Swinney
Leader of the Scottish National Party
2004 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Jack McConnell
First Minister of Scotland
2007 – present
Incumbent
Order of precedence in Scotland
Preceded by
The Rt. Hon. Michael Martin
(Speaker of the House of Commons)
Order of Precedence
(gentlemen)
(Scotland)
Succeeded by
Alex Fergusson
(Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament)
Alex Salmond

 
 

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