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Encyclopedia > Alençon

Alençon is a town in Mont Saint Michel is a historic pilgrimage site and a symbol of Normandy Normandy is a former country (a Duchy) situated in northern France occupying the lower Seine area (upper or Haute-Normandie) and the region to the west (lower or Basse-Normandie) as far as the Cotentin Peninsula. Upper... Normandy, The French Republic or France ( French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. France is a democracy organised as a... France, In France, a préfecture is the capital city of a département. By extension, it is also the name of one of the governing bodies of the département, and of the building housing this government body. Role There are 100 préfectures in France... préfecture (capital) of the Orne is a département in the northwest of France named after the Orne River. History Orne was one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. It was created from parts of the former provinces of Normandie and Perche. Geography Orne is... Orne The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France, roughly analogous to British counties and are now grouped into 22 metropolitan and four overseas régions. They are subdivided into 342 arrondissements. Départements are also found in Côte dIvoire. Administrative role Each... département, 105 miles west of The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. Paris is the capital city of France, as well as the capital of the Île-de-France région, whose territory encompasses Paris and its suburbs. The city of Paris proper is also a dé... Paris. Population (1999): 30,380.

Contents

Administration

Alençon belongs to the Communauté urbaine d'Alençon, with 52,000 people.


History

It is probably during the (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. Events Definitive declaration of biblical canon: Council of Carthage Demotic is replaced by Greek Constantine I ends persecution of Christians in... 4th century, while the area was being The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once (a political shift as much as a spontaneous mass shift in individual consciences), also includes the practice of converting pagan cult practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... christianized, that the city of Alençon was born. The name is first seen in a document dated to the ( 6th century - 7th century - 8th century - other centuries) Events Islam starts in Arabia, the Quran is written, and Arabs subjugate Syria, Iraq, Persia, Egypt, North Africa and Central Asia to Islam. Sutton Hoo ship burial, East Anglia (modern England) Xuan Zang (aka Hsuan-Tsang) travelled from China to India... 7th century. During the ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. Events The beginning of the Medieval Warm Period Viking groups settle in northern France - Norse become Normans Foundation of Cluny, first... 10th century, Alençon was a A buffer state is a country lying between two rival or potentially hostile greater Powers that by its sheer existence is thought to prevent conflict between them. Buffer states typically pursue a neutralist foreign policy, which distinguish them from satellite states. Examples of buffer states include: Afghanistan, between Russia and... buffer state between Normandy (to the north) and the Maine is one of the traditional provinces of France. It corresponds to the old county of Maine, centered around the city of Le Mans. The county bordered on the county of Anjou and the duchy of Normandy, and Maine became a great matter of contention between the rulers of these... Maine regions (to the south). Alençon was occupied by the Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Official language None; English is de facto Capital London Capitals coordinates 51° 30 N, 0° 10 W Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK... English during the Anglo-Norman wars of Events Pierre Abélard opens his school in Paris End of Kyanzitthas reign in Myanmar Alaungsithus reign begins in Myanmar Suryavarman Is reign begins in the Khmer Empire Births Geoffrey of Anjou Deaths Categories: 1113 ... 1113 to Events April 16 - Philip II of France enters Rouen, leading to the eventual unification of Normandy and France. June 23 - Fleet of the Fourth Crusade enters Bosphorus July 17 - Fourth Crusade captures Constantinople by assault; the Byzantine emperor Alexius III flees from his capital into exile. August 1 - Fourth Crusade... 1203.


The city became the seat of a The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... duke in Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. 1372; d. 20 Sep 1440) becomes Burgrave of Nuremberg March 14 - Jan Hus travels to the Council of Constance to propose reforms for the church May 5 - the Council of Constance condemns the writings of John Wycliffe and asks Jan Hus to recant in public... 1415, belonging to the sons of France until the The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which democrats and republicans overthrew the absolute monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. While France would oscillate among republic, empire, and monarchy for 75 years... French Revolution, and some of them played an important role in French history: see Duke of Alençon. The Revolution ( 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). Events January 7 - First nationwide United States election January 21 - The first American novel, The Power of Sympathy or the Triumph of Nature Founded in Truth, is printed in Boston, Massachusetts January 23 - Georgetown College becomes the first... 1789- 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Events March 1 - Federalist James Ross becomes President Pro Tempore of the United States Senate. March 7 - Napoleon captures Jaffa in Palestine and his troops proceed to kill more than 2,000 Albanian captives. March 29 - New York... 1799) caused relatively little disorder: a few riots, some plunder, some deaths.


The fabric industry, prosperous since Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. August 23 - Colonel George Monck forms Moncks Regiment of Foot, forerunner of Coldstream Guards November 4 - William III of Orange becomes Prince... 1650, started to decline at that time. The economic development of the Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century and the industrial boom was generated by several factories (mills), and transportation networks (roads and railways) developed. Unfortunately, the major railway from For the city in Belarus, see Brest, Belarus. Location within France Brest, at the tip of Brittany Brest (population of the city: 146,000 inhabitants as of 2004 estimates; population of the metropolitan area: 303,484 inhabitants as of 1999 census) is a city in the Bretagne région... Brest (western tip of France) and The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. Paris is the capital city of France, as well as the capital of the Île-de-France région, whose territory encompasses Paris and its suburbs. The city of Paris proper is also a dé... Paris misses Alençon and favors Le Mans is a city in France, located at the Sarthe River. It is the pr fecture (capital) of the Sarthe d partement. History First mentioned by Ptolemy (GEography 2.8.8), the Roman city Vindinium was the capital of the Aulerci, a client tribe of the Aedui. Their city... Le Mans, 50 km south, instead.


Up until Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (60,000 ft) into the air. August 9, 1945 World War II was a global conflict that started in 7 July 1937 in Asia and 1 September 1939 in Europe and lasted until 1945, involving the majority of the... World War II, the neglected city turned in on itself, despite a flourishing Printing is an industrial process for reproducing copies of texts and images, typically with ink on paper using a printing press. It is an essential part of publishing. Books are usually printed today using the technique of offset printing,and occasionally relief print, (which is principally used for newspapers and... printing industry.


On June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. Events 1497 - Battle of Deptford Bridge - Forces under King Henry VII soundly defeat troops led by Michael An Gof. 1565 - Matsunaga Hisahide assassinates the 13th Ashikaga Shogun, Ashikaga Yoshiteru... June 17, 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-February January 5 - FM radio is demonstrated to the FCC for the first time. January 6 - World War II: Mass execution of Poles, committed by Germans in the Poznan, Warthegau. January 12 - World War... 1940, the German army invaded Alençon. On August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 141 days remaining. Events 1000-1899 1099 -- First Crusade: Battle of Ascalon - Crusaders defeat Saracens and the Kingdom of Jerusalem is established under Godfrey of Bouillon. 1323 - Treaty of Nö... August 12, 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). Events World War II January January 4 - The Battle of Monte Cassino begins. January 5 - Murder of Danish playwright Kaj Munk January 17 - British forces, in Italy, cross the Garigliano River. January 20 - The Royal Air... 1944, the city was the first French city of the continent to be liberated by the French army, by Philippe de Hauteclocque, often known by his French resistance alias Leclerc (November 22, 1902 - November 28, 1947), was a Marshal of France. He was born in Belloy-Saint-Léonard, Somme, France. He was Governor of French Cameroon from August 29, 1940 to November 12, 1940. During World War II... General Leclerc, after minor destruction.


After the war, the population sharply increased, and new industries settled, such as Moulinex, a home appliance manufacturer.


Economy

Alençon is also home to a prosperous plastics industry, and, since 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003) Events January January 1 - Czechoslovakia divides. Establishment of independent Slovakia and Czech Republic. January 3 - In Moscow, George H. W. Bush and... 1993, to a plastics engineering school.


Transportation

Alençon is now linked to the The Autoroute system in France consists largely of toll roads, except around large cities. It is a network of 7,000 km worth of highways. Autoroute destinations are shown in blue, while destinations reached through a combination of highways and autoroutes are shown with an added autoroute logo. Toll autoroutes... autoroute (major interstate) system with Le Mans, and soon (end of 2005) to Location within France Rouen (pronounced in French, sometimes also ) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northern France, and presently the capital of the Upper Normandy région. Once one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, Rouen was the seat of the Exchequer of... Rouen.

Info: Library of Alençon Credit: Library of Alencon, 2004 Source: fr:Image:Bibliotheque alencon 250px.jpg File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image uploaded on...
Info: Library of Alençon Credit: Library of Alencon, 2004 Source: fr:Image:Bibliotheque alencon 250px.jpg File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image uploaded on... Enlarge
Library of Alençon

Miscellaneous

In the (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. During this period, the power of England and the United Provinces increased; while that of Spain and Portugal declined. Similarly, the power... 17th century Alençon was chiefly noted for its White lace is often used in collars and other fabric borders. Needle Lace borders from the Erzgebirge mountains Germany in 1884, displayed in the Victoria and Albert Museum. Lace-making is an ancient craft. A lace fabric is lightweight openwork fabric, patterned, either by machine or by hand,with open... lace called point d'Alençon.


It is This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. Town twinning or sister cities is a concept where towns or cities from geographically and politically distinct areas are paired, with the accent on fostering human contact and... twinned with View from Basingstoke railway station forecourt Basingstoke is a new town in the county of Hampshire in the UK. It is the seat of the Basingstoke and Deane district. In 1996 it had a population of 86,600. Basingstoke is a prosperous town with an above-average standard of living... Basingstoke ( Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Official language None; English is de facto Capital London Capitals coordinates 51° 30 N, 0° 10 W Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK... England)


Births

Alençon was the birthplace of:

  • Pierre Allix (1641 - March 3, 1717), French Protestant pastor and author. Born in 1641 in Alençon, France, he became a pastor first at Saint-Agobile Champagne, and then at Charenton, near Paris. The revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 compelled him to take refuge in London where... Pierre Allix ( Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. August 10 – Charles I of England flees London for the north Rebellion of the Gaelic Irish in Ulster against the English settlers The Dutch found a trading colony on Dejima, near Nagasaki... 1641- Events January 4 — The Britain & France sign Triple Alliance March 2 — Dancer John Weaver performs in the first ballet in Britain shown in Drury Lane The Loves of Mars and Venus March 31 - Bishop Benjamin Hoadly, acting on the advice of King George begins the Bangorian Controversy... 1717), Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. It generally refers to those that separated from the Roman Catholic Church in the Reformation of the 16th century, their offshoots, and those that share similar doctrines or ideologies. It is commonly considered one of the three major branches of Christianity... Protestant pastor and author
  • Jacques Hébert ( Events March 14 - On-board the HMS Monarch, Admiral John Byng is executed by firing squad for neglecting his duty. June 23 - Indian Mutiny: Battle of Plassey - 3000 British troops under Robert Clive defeat a 50,000 strong Indian army under Siraj-ud-Dawlah at Plassey. Change of emperor of... 1757- Events February 11 - 1st session of the United States Senate is open to the public. March 14 - Eli Whitney is granted a patent for the cotton gin. March 27 - The United States Government established a permanent United States Navy and authorized the building of six vessels (in 1797 the first... 1794), editor of the extreme radical newspaper Le Père Duchesne during the The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which democrats and republicans overthrew the absolute monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. While France would oscillate among republic, empire, and monarchy for 75 years... French Revolution
  • Thérèse de Lisieux ( Events January - April January 17 - Indian Wars: First Battle of the Stronghold during the Modoc War. February 11 - Spanish Cortes deposes King Amadeus I and proclaims the First Spanish Republic. February 12 - Former foreign minister Emilio Cistelar y Ripoli becomes prime minister of the new Spanish Republic. February 20 - The... 1873- Events January 1 - Brooklyn, New York merges with New York City. January 4 - A British force is ambushed by Chief Ologbosheri, son-in-law of the Oba of Benin. This leads to a Punitive Expedition against Benin. February 2 - Harrisburg, the Pennsylvania state capitol, is destroyed by fire. February 18... 1897), The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. Members generally prefer the term Catholic Church, but this term has multiple meanings (see Catholicism); the term Roman Catholic Church is used in this article to avoid... Roman Catholic In general, a nun is a female ascetic who chooses to voluntarily leave the world and live her life in prayer and contemplation in a monastery or convent. The term nun is applicable to Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox Christians, Anglicans, Lutherans, and Buddhists, for example. The male equivalent of a... nun who was This article discusses the process of declaring saints. For the canonization of Scripture, see Biblical canon. Canonization is the process used in traditional Christianity of recognizing those persons who have lived exemplary lives suitable of identifying them as Christian Saints. It is currently practiced by the Roman Catholic Church and... canonised as a General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. It can be applied to both the living and the dead and is an acceptable term in most of the worlds popular religions. The Saint is held up by the community... saint, and is one of only 33 In Roman Catholicism, a Doctor of the Church is a theologian from whose teachings the whole Christian church is held to have derived great advantage and to whom eminent learning and great sanctity have been attributed by a proclamation of the Pope or of an ecumenical council. This honor is... Doctors of the Church
  • Daniel Balavoine ( Summary of notable events in 1952. Events January events January 8 - West Germany has 8 million refugees inside its borders. January 24 - Sudden heavy snowfall in Algeria. January 24 - Vincent Massey sworn in as first Canada-born Governor-General of Canada. February events February 2 - A Cuba moving northeast. The... 1952- 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January January 1 - Spain and Portugal enter the European Community January 1 - Aruba gains increased autonomy from the Netherlands and is separated from the Netherlands Antilles. January 9 - After losing a patent battle with Polaroid, Kodak leaves... 1986), In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i.e. uses the voice as an instrument to make music. A lead singer is one who sings the primary vocals of a song, as opposed to a backup singer who sings backup vocals to a song... singer and A songwriter is someone who writes either the lyrics or the music for songs. The same person may write both. Writing the music is also called composition. Sometimes the word composer is used interchangeably with the word songwriter though, strictly speaking, they are not quite the same thing. The word... songwriter

External link

  • http://www.ville-alencon.fr/

 
 

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