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Encyclopedia > Alemannic German
Alemannic German
Alemannisch 
Pronunciation: [alɛˈman(ː)ɪʃ]
Spoken in: Switzerland: entire German-speaking part.
Germany: most of Baden-Württemberg and Bavarian Swabia.
Austria: Vorarlberg.
Liechtenstein: entire country.
France: Alsace.
Italy: some parts of Aosta Valley and northern Piedmont
Venezuela: Colonia Tovar
Total speakers: about 10 million
Language family: Indo-European
 Germanic
  West Germanic
   High German
    Upper German
     Alemannic German 
Writing system: Latin alphabet
Language codes
ISO 639-1: -
ISO 639-2: gsw
ISO 639-3: variously:
gct — Alemán Coloniero
gsw — Swiss German
swg — Swabian German
wae — Walser German 
Alemannic-speaking regions (situation around 1950)
Alemannic-speaking regions (situation around 1950)

  Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE1 Capital Stuttgart Prime Minister Günther Oettinger (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  35,752 km² (13,804 sq mi) Population 10,741,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 300... Swabia (German: Schwaben) is one of the seven administrative regions of Bavaria, Germany, located in the south-west of Bavaria. ... Vorarlberg is the westernmost state (Land) of Austria. ... (New region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² (??? mi) km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... Colonia Tovar The Colonia Tovar (Tovar Colony) is a city located in the Tovar Municipality of the Aragua State, Venezuela about 60 km from its nearest city, Caracas. ... Current distribution of Human Language Families A language family is a group of related languages said to have descended from a common proto-language. ... The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred related languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many spoken in the Indian subcontinent (South Asia), the Iranian plateau (Southwest Asia), and Central Asia. ... The Germanic languages in Europe are divided into North (blue) and West Germanic (green and orange) Languages  Low Saxon-Low Franconian (Dutch)  High German (standard German, Schwyzerdütsch)  Insular Anglo-Frisian (English, Scots)  Continental Anglo-Frisian (Frisian)  East North Germanic (Danish, BokmÃ¥l Norwegian, Swedish)  West North Germanic (Nynorsk Norwegian... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Some basics of Germanic linguistics : in linguistics, German and Germanic do not have the same meaning: see Germanic. ... Writing systems of the world today. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... ISO 639-1 is the first part of the ISO 639 international-standard language-code family. ... ISO 639-2 is the second part of the ISO 639 standard, which lists codes for the representation of the names of languages. ... ISO 639-3 is an international standard for language codes. ... Alemán Coloniero, spoken in Colonia Tovar, is a dialect that belongs to the Low Alemannic branch of German. ... Swiss German (Schweizerdeutsch, Schwyzerdütsch, Schwiizertüütsch, Schwizertitsch) is any of the Alemannic dialects spoken in Switzerland. ... Swabian (Schwäbisch) is one of the Alemannic dialects of High German, spoken in the region of Swabia. ... Distribution of Highest Alemannic dialects The Walser language, in German Walserdeutsch, is a group of Highest Alemannic dialects spoken in Walser settlements in parts of Switzerland, Italy, Liechtenstein, and Austria. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 422 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1831 × 2598 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 422 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1831 × 2598 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Alemannic German (Alemannisch) is a group of dialects of the Upper German branch of the Germanic language family. It is spoken by approximately ten million people in six different countries including southern Germany, Switzerland, France, Austria, Liechtenstein, and Italy. The name derives from the ancient Germanic alliance of tribes known as the Alamanni. A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... Some basics of Germanic linguistics : in linguistics, German and Germanic do not have the same meaning: see Germanic. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples who settled in northern Europe along the borders of the Roman Empire. ... Area settled by the Alamanni, and sites of Roman-Alamannic battles, 3rd to 6th century The Alamanni, Allemanni, or Alemanni were originally an alliance of west Germanic tribes located around the upper Main, a river that is one of the largest tributaries of the Rhine, on land that is today...

Contents

Status

Alemannic itself comprises a dialect continuum, from the Highest Alemannic spoken in the mountainous south to Swabian in the relatively flat north, with more of the characteristics of Standard German the further north you go. A dialect continuum is a range of dialects spoken across a large geographical area, differing only slightly between areas that are geographically close, and gradually decreasing in mutual intelligibility as the distances become greater. ...


Some linguists and organisations that differentiate between languages and dialects primarily on the grounds of mutual intelligibility, such as SIL International and UNESCO, describe Alemannic German as one or several independent languages. ISO/DIS 639-3 distinguishes four languages: gsw "Alemannisch", swg "Swabian", wae "Walser" and gct "Colonia Tovar German" (spoken from 1843 in Venezuela). Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... SIL International is a worldwide non-profit evangelical Christian organization whose main purpose is to study, develop and document lesser-known languages in order to expand linguistic knowledge, promote literacy and aid minority language development. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... ISO 639-3 is in process of development as an international standard for language codes. ... GSW is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: Geo Science World Get Smart Week Golden State Warriors Gunshot Wound Greater Southwest International Airport General Steel Wares, an appliance and home siding manufacturer in Ontario, Canada This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with... Wo, Wae or Wa (Chinese and Japanese: 倭, Korean: 왜) is an ancient name of Japan in Chinese. ... Colonia Tovar The Colonia Tovar (Tovar Colony) is a city located in the Tovar Municipality of the Aragua State, Venezuela about 60 km from its nearest city, Caracas. ...


At this level, the distinction between a language and a dialect is linguistically meaningless and constitutes a cultural and political question. Standard German is used in writing, and orally in formal contexts, throughout the Alemannic speaking regions (with the exception of Alsace), and Alemannic varieties are generally considered German dialects (more precisely, a dialect group within Upper German) rather than separate languages. A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... Standard German is the prescriptive norm variant of the German language used as a written language, in formal contexts, and for communication between different dialect areas. ... (New region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² (??? mi) km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... By the High German consonant shift, the former Dutch-German dialect continuum. ... Some basics of Germanic linguistics : in linguistics, German and Germanic do not have the same meaning: see Germanic. ...


Variants

Alemannic comprises the following variants:

Note that the Alemannic dialects of Switzerland are often called Swiss German or Schwyzerdütsch. Swabian (Schwäbisch) is one of the Alemannic dialects of High German, spoken in the region of Swabia. ... Germany, showing modern borders. ... Middle High German (MHG, German Mittelhochdeutsch) is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350. ... Low Alemannic is a branch of Alemannic dialects and belongs to the German language, even though they are only partly intelligible to German speakers. ... Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ... For other uses, see Baden (disambiguation). ... Vorarlberg is the westernmost state (Land) of Austria. ... This inscription in Alsatian on a window in Eguisheim, Alsace, reads: Dis Hausz sted in Godes Hand - God bewar es vor Feyru (This house stands in Gods hand - God beware it for fire) Alsatian (French Alsacien, German Elsässisch) is a Low Alemannic German dialect spoken in Alsace, a... (New region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² (??? mi) km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Alemán Coloniero, spoken in Colonia Tovar, is a dialect that belongs to the Low Alemannic branch of German. ... Basel German or Baseldytsch (also Baseldütsch, Baseldeutsch) is the dialect of the city of Basel, Switzerland. ... Basel (British English traditionally: Basle and more recently Basel , German: , French: , Italian: ) is Switzerlands third most populous city (166,563 inhabitants (2004); 690,000 inhabitants in the metropolitan area stretching across the immediate cantonal and national boundaries made Basel Switzerlands second-largest urban area as of 2003). ... High Alemannic is a branch of Alemannic dialects and belongs to the German language, even though they are only partly intelligible to German speakers. ... Vorarlberg is the westernmost state (Land) of Austria. ... A map of Germany, showing the Black Forest in red. ... High German subdivides into Upper German (green) and Central German (blue), and is distinguished from Low German (yellow). ... Bernese German is the dialect of High Alemannic German spoken in the Swiss plateau (Mittelland) part of the canton of Bern and in some neighbouring regions. ... Zürich German is the dialect of High Alemannic German spoken in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. ... Vorarlbergerisch (or Vorarlbergisch) is a Germanic dialect spoken in Vorarlberg, a province of Austria. ... Highest Alemannic is a branch of Alemannic dialects and belongs to the German language, even though mutual intellegibility with Standard German and other non-Alemannic German dialects is very limited. ... The Valais (German:  ) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland in the south-western part of the country, in the Pennine Alps around the valley of the Rhone River from its springs to Lake Geneva. ... Distribution of Highest Alemannic dialects The Walser are German-speaking people (more specifically, they speak Walser German dialects) that live in the alps of Switzerland, Italy, Liechtenstein and Austria. ... View of Thun and Lake Thun from the Niederhorn The Bernese Oberland (Bernese highlands) is the higher part of the canton of Bern, Switzerland, in the South of the canton: The area around Lake Thun and Lake Brienz, and the valleys of the Bernese Alps (thus, the inhabitable parts from... The Canton of Fribourg is a canton of Switzerland. ... Hiatus in linguistics is the separate pronunciation of two adjacent vowels, sometimes with an intervening glottal stop. ... Distribution of Highest Alemannic dialects The Walliser German (Walliserdeutsch in German) is a group of Highest Alemannic dialects spoken in Switzerland, specifically in the German-speaking part of the Canton of Wallis (in French: Valais), in the uppermost Rhône valley. ... Distribution of Highest Alemannic dialects The Walser language, in German Walserdeutsch, is a group of Highest Alemannic dialects spoken in Walser settlements in parts of Switzerland, Italy, Liechtenstein, and Austria. ... Swiss German (Schweizerdeutsch, Schwyzerdütsch, Schwiizertüütsch, Schwizertitsch) is any of the Alemannic dialects spoken in Switzerland. ...


Written Alemannic

The oldest known texts in Alemannic are brief Elder Futhark inscriptions dating to the 6th century (Bülach fibula, Pforzen buckle, Nordendorf fibula). In the Old High German period, the first coherent texts are recorded in the St. Gall Abbey, among them the 8th century Paternoster, The 24 runes of the Elder Futhark The Elder Futhark (or Elder Fuþark, Older Futhark, Old Futhark) is the oldest form of the runic alphabet, used by Germanic tribes for Proto-Norse and other Migration period Germanic dialects of the 2nd to 8th centuries for inscriptions on artifacts (jewelery... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... An Alamannic fibula found in Bülach in the Canton of Zürich, a silver disc-brooch with almandine inlay, discovered in 1927 in a womans grave in a row-gravefield. ... The Pforzen buckle is a silver belt buckle found in Pforzen, Ostallgäu. ... The Nordendorf fibula is an early 7th century Alamannic fibula found in Nordendorf near Augsburg (Bavaria). ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... Abbey of St. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ...

Fater unser, thu bist in himile
uuihi namu dinan
qhueme rihhi diin
uuerde uuillo diin,
so in himile, sosa in erdu
prooth unseer emezzihic kip uns hiutu
oblaz uns sculdi unsero
so uuir oblazem uns skuldikem
enti ni unsih firleit in khorunka
uzzer losi unsih fona ubile

Due to the importance of the Carolingian abbeys of St. Gall and Reichenau Island, a considerable part of the Old High German corpus has Alemannic traits. Alemannic Middle High German is less prominent, in spite of the Codex Manesse compiled by Johannes Hadlaub of Zürich. The rise of the Old Swiss Confederacy from the 14th century leads to the creation of Alemannic Swiss chronicles. Ulrich Zwingli's bible translation of the 1520s (the 1531 Froschauer Bible) was in an Alemannic variant of Early Modern High German. From the 17th century, written Alemannic was displaced by Standard German, which emerged from 16th century Early Modern High German, in particular in the wake of Martin Luther's bible translation of the 1520s. The 1665 revision of the Froschauer Bible removed the Alemannic elements, approaching the language used by Luther. For this reason, no binding orthographical standard for writing modern Alemannic emerged, and orthographies in use usually compromise between a precise phonological notation, and proximity to the familiar Standard German orthography (in particular for loanwords). Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... The Abbey of St. ... 15th-century towers on the Romanesque church of Sts Peter and Paul in Reichenau-Niederzell Reichenau Island lies in Lake Constance in southern Germany, at approximately . ... Middle High German (MHG, German Mittelhochdeutsch) is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350. ... Folio 371r shows Johannes Hadlaub Folio 124r shows Walther von der Vogelweide The Manesse Codex or Große Heidelberger Liederhandschrift (Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg Library, Cod. ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... 1550 illustration for the Sempacherbrief of 1393, one of the major alliance contracts of the Old Swiss Confederacy The Old Swiss Confederacy was the precursor of modern-day Switzerland. ... Several illustrated chronicles were created in the Old Swiss Confederacy in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... Zwinglis Successor Zwinglis successor, Heinrich Bullinger, was elected on December 9, 1531, to be the pastor of the Great Minster at Zürich, a position which he held to the end of his life (1575). ... ... Zürich Bible (Zürcher Bibel, also Zwinglibibel) is a bible translation historically based on the translation by Ulrich Zwingli. ... Early Modern High German (Frühneuhochdeutsch), is the direct ancestor of the modern German language, and was used from 1350 to 1650. ... Standard German is the prescriptive norm variant of the German language used as a written language, in formal contexts, and for communication between different dialect areas. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Early Modern High German (Frühneuhochdeutsch), is the direct ancestor of the modern German language, and was used from 1350 to 1650. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... ...


Johann Peter Hebel published his Alemannische Gedichte in 1803. Swiss authors often consciously employ Helvetisms within Standard German, notably Jeremias Gotthelf in his novels set in the Emmental, and more recently Tim Krohn in his Quatemberkinder. Johann Peter Hebel was a German short story writer and dialectal poet, most famous for his collection of alemannic tales Schatzkästlein des rheinischen Hausfreundes (Treasure chest of the family friend by the Rhine). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A Helvetism (new lat. ... Jeremias Gotthelf Albert Bitzius (October 4, 1797 - October 22, 1854), Swiss novelist, best known by his pen name of Jeremias Gotthelf, was born at Morat, where his father was pastor. ... The Emmental is a valley and a landscape in the swiss canton of Bern. ...


Characteristics

  • The diminutive is used frequently in all Alemannic dialects. Northern and eastern dialects use the suffix -le; southern dialects use the suffix -li (Standard German suffix -lein or -chen). Depending on dialect, thus, 'little house' could be Häusle, Hüüsle, Hüüsli or Hiisli (Standard German Häuslein or Häuschen).
  • A significant difference between the high and low variants is the pronunciation of ch after the front vowels (i, e, ä, ö and ü) and consonants. In Standard German and the lower variants, this is a palatal [ç] (the Ich-Laut), whereas in the higher variants, a velar or uvular [χ] or [x] (the ach-Laut) is used.
  • The verb to be is conjugated differently in the various dialects:
    (The common gs*-forms do historically derive from words akin to ge-sein, not found in modern standard German.)
The conjugation of the verb to be in Alemannic dialects
English
(standard German)
Low Swabian Alsatian Allgäuerisch Lower
Markgräflerland
Voralpenland Eastern Swiss German Western Swiss German Sensler
I am
(ich bin)
I ben I bìn I bin Ich bi I bee I bi I(g) bi I bü/bi
You are
(du bist)
du bisch dü bìsch du bisch du bisch dou bisch du bisch du bisch du büsch/bisch
He is
(er ist)
er isch är ìsch är isch är isch är isch är isch är isch är isch
We are
(wir sind)
mir send mir sìnn mir send/sönd mir sin mr send m(i)r send/sön/sinn mir sy mier sy
You are
(ihr seid)
ihr send ihr sìnn ihr send ihr sin ihr send i(i)r sönd/sind dihr syt dier syt
They are
(sie sind)
dui send sie sìnn dui send si sin dia send di sönd si sy si sy
I have been
(ich bin ... gewesen)
i ben gwä i bìn gsìnn i bi gsi ich bi gsi i bee gsei i bi gsi i(g) bi gsi/gsy i bü/bi gsy
Modern Germanic languages
Afrikaans | Alemannic | Danish | Dutch | English | Faroese | Frisian | German | Icelandic |
Limburgish | Low German | Luxembourgish | Norwegian | Scots | Swedish | Yiddish

A diminutive is a formation of a word used to convey a slight degree of the root meaning, smallness of the object or quality named, encapsulation, intimacy, or endearment. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Wiktionary:Swadesh lists for Afrikaans and Dutch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the Frisian languages, as spoken in the north of the Netherlands and Germany. ... Limburgish, or Limburgian or Limburgic (Dutch: Limburgs, German: Limburgisch, French: Limbourgeois) is a group of Franconian varieties, spoken in the Limburg and Rhineland regions, near the common Dutch / Belgian / German border. ... Low German (also called Niederdeutsch, Plattdeutsch or Plattdüütsch) is a name for the regional language varieties of the West Germanic languages spoken mainly in Northern Germany where it is officially called Niederdeutsch (Low German), and in Eastern Netherlands where it is officially called Nedersaksisch (Low Saxon). Low refers to... Luxembourgish (Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuergesch, French: , German: , Walloon: ), also spelled Luxemburgish, is a West Germanic language spoken in Luxembourg. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Yiddish (Yid. ...

See Also

Alemannic Separatism is a political movement advocating the unification of the Alemannic speech areas northeast of the Rhine and Lake Constance with Switzerland and Federal Republic of Germany, lie in the reunification of Germany, the apparent dismantling of the Welfare State, the economic problems of Germany, and the introduction of...

External links

Wikipedia
Alemannic German edition of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • Ethnologue
  • Alemanni poems and Alemanni encyclopedia -German-

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alemannic German - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (580 words)
Alemannic German (Alemannisch) is a group of dialects of the Upper German branch of the Germanic language family.
Highest Alemannic (in the Canton of Wallis, in the Walser settlements, in the Bernese Oberland and in the German-speaking part of Fribourg).
The conjugation of the verb to be in Alemannic dialects
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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