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Encyclopedia > Aleksey Petrovich Yermolov

Aleksey Petrovich Yermolov, or Ermolov (1777-1861), was the premier Russian military hero during the golden age of Russian Romanticism. His charismatic leadership of imperial armies was praised in the poems by Alexander Pushkin, Vasily Zhukovsky, and others. Alexey P. Ermolov (1777-1861) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Alexey P. Ermolov (1777-1861) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... Charisma is also a horse that won several gold medals in the sport of eventing. ... Aleksandr Pushkin was a Russian poet and a founder of modern Russian literature Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин) (June 6 (May 26, O.S.), 1799 - February 10 (January 29, O.S.), 1837), Russian author, whom many consider the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. ... After losing to the 18-year-old Pushkin a bet on who would write a better fairy tale, Zhukovsky presented to him this portrait with an inscription: To the victorious disciple from the beaten tutor. Vasily Andreyevich Zhukovsky ( 29 Jan. ...


Yermolov was born on May 24, 1777 in Moscow in the officer's family. He studied at the school of the Moscow University and entered the army in 1791. After seeing some service under Suvorov in the Polish campaign of 1794 and under Zubov in the War with Persia (1796), he was accused of libertarian views and exiled to Kostroma (1798-1801). May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Saint Basils Cathedral and Spasskaya Tower of Moscow Kremlin at Red Square. ... Moscow State University campus M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Московский Государственный Университет имени М.В.Ломоносова, often abbreviated МГУ, MSU, MGU) is considered the oldest university in Russia, founded in 1755. ... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Monument to Suvorov as youthful Mars, the Roman god of war (1801). ... The Kościuszko Uprising took place in Poland in 1794. ... The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Kostroma (Russian: Кострома́) is a historic city in central Russia, administrative centre of the Kostroma Oblast. ...


Upon being pardoned, Yermolov started studying the works of Suvorov, whose disciple he now considered himself. His own military genius blossomed in the Napoleonic wars. During Napoleon's invasion of Russia, he distinguished himself at Valutino, Maloyaroslavets, and especially at Borodino. His astonishing prowess won him admiration of the commander-in-chief, Prince Kutuzov, on whose recommendation he was appointed to command the general staff of united armies. During the European campaigns of 1813 and 1814, Yermolov was in charge of the artillery corps of the allies. His able command proved crucial for their success in the Battle of Kulm. The Napoleonic Wars was a series of wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule of France. ... Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg and the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow were built to commemorate the Russian victory against Napoleon. ... The Battle of Valutino took place on August 9, 1812, between Marshal Neys corps, about 30,000 strong, and a strong rear-guard of General Barclay de Tollys army of about 40,000, commanded by the General himself. ... The Battle of Maloyaroslavets took place on October 24, 1812, between the Russians, under Marshal Kutuzov, and part of the corps of Eugène de Beauharnais, Napoleons son_in_law, under General Delzons with numbered about 20,000 strong. ... The Battle of Borodino (Russian: Бородино) (September 7, 1812 (August 26 in the Old Style Russian calendar)), also called the Battle of the Moskva, was the largest and bloodiest single-day battle of the Napoleonic Wars, involving nearly a quarter of a million soldiers. ... Prince Mikhail Illarionovich Golenishchev-Kutuzov (September 16, 1745 – April 28, 1813 (n. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... The Battle of Kulm was a battle of the Napoleonic Wars. ...


Since 1816, Yermolov (by that time promoted to the rank of full artillery general) was responsible for Russian military policies in Caucasus. For ten years he was both commander-in-chief of the Georgian armies and the imperial ambassador in Persia. His freedom-loving character would often lead him to conflicts with the Ministry of War. But he was adored by his soldiers and generally successful in his subjugation of highlanders of Dagestan. The Decembrist officers were also among his admirers; this connection brought his career to an abrupt end in 1827, when Nicholas I made him resign his posts, or otherwise face charges of siding with the Decembrists. The Caucasus , a region bordering Asia Minor, is located between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea which includes the Caucasus mountains and surrounding lowlands. ... The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... The Republic of Dagestan (Russian: ), older spelling Daghestan, is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... This article is about the failed Russian revolt. ... 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nicholas I Pavlovich (Russian: Николай I Павлович, July 6 (June 25, Old Style), 1796–March 2 (February 18, Old Style), 1855) was the Emperor of Russia and king of Poland from 1825 until his death in 1855. ...


During the last 30 years of his life, Yermolov lived in seclusion at his manor near Orel. He was asked to lead a peasant militia during the Crimean War but declined on account of poor health. He died on April 11, 1861 in Moscow and was buried in Orel. Yermolov's memoirs were published posthumously in two volumes. Orel or Oryol (Орёл) is a city in Russia, administrative center of the Oryol Oblast. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Crimean War 1853-6 The Crimean War lasted from 28 March 1854 until 1856. ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (102nd in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A memoir, as a literary genre, forms a sub-class of autobiography. ...


ERMOLOV (Yermolov), Aleksey Petrovich (b. 4 June 1772, Moscow – 23 April 1861, Moscow) was born a Russian noble family from the Orlov gubernia. He graduated from the boarding school of the Moscow University and enlisted in the Life Guard Preobrazhensk Regiment on 16 January 1787. Four years later, he was promoted to lieutenant and transferred to the Nizhegorod Dragoon Regiment with the rank of captain. He briefly taught at the Artillery and Engineer Cadet Corps in 1793 before being sent to fight the Polish insurgents in 1794. He participated in the assault on Praga and received the Order of St. George (4th class) on 12 January 1795. The next year, Ermolov took part in the Persian Campaign along the Caspian Sea. However, he was arrested on 7 January 1799 for alleged participation in conspiracy against the Tsar and Ermolov spent two years in exile. He was restored under Alexander I and appointed to the 8th Artillery Regiment on 13 May 1801; he then transferred to the horse artillery company on 21 June 1801.


During the 1805 Campaign, Ermolov served in the rear and advance guards and distinguished himself at Amstetten and Austerlitz. For his actions, he was promoted to colonel on 16 July 1806. The following year, he participated in the campaign in Poland, serving in Prince Bagration's advance guard. He distinguished himself commanding an artillery company in numerous rearguard actions during the retreat to Landsberg as well as in the Battle of Eylau. In June 1807, Ermolov commanded horse artillery company in the actions at Guttstadt, Deppen, Heilsberg and Friedland, garnering the Order of St. George (3rd class, 7 September 1807). He was promoted to major general on 28 March 1808 and was appointed inspector of horse artillery companies. In early 1809, he inspected artillery companies of the Army of Danube. Although his division took part in the 1809 Campaign against Austria, Ermolov commanded the reserves in Volhynia and Podolsk gubernias where he remained for the next two years. In 1811, he took command of the guard artillery company and in 1812, became the Chief of Staff of the 1st Western Army.


During the 1812 Campaign, Ermolov took part in the retreat to Smolensk and played an important role in the quarrel between Generals Barclay de Tolly and Bagration. He opposed Barclay’s strategy and appealed to Emperor Alexander to replace him with Bagration. After the Russian armies united on 2 August, Ermolov fought at Smolensk and Lubino (Valutina Gora) for which he was promoted to lieutenant general on 12 November 1812 with seniority dating from 16 August 1812. He distinguished himself at Borodino, where he was lightly wounded leading a counterattack that recaptured the Great Redoubt. For his courage, Ermolov received the Order of St. Anna (1st class). During the rest of campaign, he served as a duty officer in the headquarters of the main Russian army and fought at Maloyaroslavets.


In October-November 1812, Ermolov served in the advance guard under Miloradovich and fought at Vyazma and Krasnyi. In late November, he commanded one of the detachments in the advance guard under General Rosen taking part in the combats on the Berezina. On 3 December 1812, he was recalled to the main headquarters where he became the Chief of Staff of the Russian army. Three weeks later, he was appointed commander of the artillery of the Russian armies.


In 1813, Ermolov fought at Lutzen, where he was accused of insubordination and transferred to command the 2nd Guard Division. He then fought at Bautzen, commanding the Russian rearguard during the retreat, and at Kulm where he was decorated with the Prussian Iron Cross. In 1814, he distinguished himself in the battle around Paris and was awarded the Order of St. George on 7 April 1814. Two years later, Ermolov was appointed as commander-in-chief of the Russian forces in Georgia and commander of the Independent Georgian Corps on 21 April 1816. He proved himself an able administrator and successfully negotiated with Persia in 1818, receiving promotion to general of infantry on 4 March 1818 (Ermolov was in retirement in 1827-1831 so his seniority was changed to 1 February 1822).


Ermolov served in Georgia for nine years but was dismissed on 9 April 1827 because of his argument with General Ivan Paskevich, who was patronized by Emperor Nicholas I; Ermolov was discharged on 7 December 1827 with a full pension. However, four years later, Emperor Nicholas restored him in the rank (6 November 1831) and appointed him to the State Council; Ermolov’s rank of general of infantry was confirmed in 1833. During the Crimean War, Ermolov was elected the head of the Moscow opolchenye on 10 March 1855. He died on 23 April 1861 in Moscow and was buried at the Trinity Church in Orel. In addition to the already mentioned decorations, Ermolov was also decorated with the Russian Orders of St. Andrew the First Called, of St. Vladimir (1st class), of Alexander of Neva, of the White Eagle, and of St. Anna (1st class); foreign orders received included the Prussian Orders of Red Eagle (1st class) and the Pour le Merite, the Austrian Order of Maria Theresa (3rd class), the Baden Order of Karl Friedrich, the Persian Order of the Lion and the Sun, and two golden swords for courage (including one with diamonds).


Ermolov was one of the best artillery officers in the Russian army. He proved his abilities throughout the Napoleonic Wars and later in the Caucasus. However, he was also shrewd and cunning courtier, who often intrigued against his superiors. Because of his enigmatic character, Ermolov was often described as the “Modern Sphinx.” He proved himself a ruthless ruler in the Caucasus and distinguished himself brutally suppressing Chechen uprisings. Ermolov left very interesting and valuable memoirs on his service in 1796-1816. His “Zapiski” are divided into three parts covering his early career, the Napoleonic wars and his service in the Caucasus. In 2005, Ravenhall Books published his memoirs under titles " The Czar's General The Memoirs of a Russian General by Alexey Yermolov," translated and edited by Alexander Mikaberidze


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Aleksey Petrovich Yermolov Information (1308 words)
Yermolov was born in Moscow in an officer's family.
During the European campaigns of 1813 and 1814, Yermolov was in charge of the artillery corps of the allies.
Since 1816, Yermolov (by that time promoted to the rank of full artillery general) was responsible for Russian military policies in Caucasus.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Aleksey Petrovich Yermolov (375 words)
Yermolov was born on May 24, 1777 in Moscow in the officer's family.
After seeing some service under Suvorov in the Polish campaign of 1794 and under Zubov in the War with Persia (1796), he was accused of libertarian views and exiled to Kostroma (1798-1801).
The Decembrist officers were also among his admirers; this connection brought his career to an abrupt end in 1827, when Nicholas I made him resign his posts, or otherwise face charges of siding with the Decembrists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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