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Encyclopedia > Alec Guinness
Sir Alec Guinness

Birth name Alec Guinness de Cuffe
Born 2 April 1914(1914-04-02)
Paddington, London, England
Died 5 August 2000 (aged 86)
Midhurst, West Sussex, England
Years active 1934-1996
Spouse(s) Merula Salaman (1938-2000)

Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE (2 April 19145 August 2000) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning English actor. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Paddington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... , Midhurst is a market town in the English county of West Sussex, with a population of approximately 5000. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actors of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is a spy novel by John le Carré, first published in 1974. ... For the article by Neal Stephenson, see Smileys people. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

Guinness was born on 2 April 1914 in Paddington, London as Alec Guinness de Cuffe.[1] Under the column for name (where the first names only are usually stated) his birth certificate says 'Alec Guinness'. There is nothing written in the column for name and surname of father. In the column for mother's name is written 'Agnes de Cuffe'. On this basis it has been frequently speculated that the actor's father was a member of the Irish Guinness family. However, his benefactor was a Scottish banker named Andrew Geddes, and the similarity of his name to the name written on the actor's birth certificate ('Alec Guinness') may be a subtle reference to the identity of the actor's father. From 1875, English law required both the presence and consent of the father when the birth of an illegitimate child was registered in order for his name to be put on the certificate. His mother's maiden name was Agnes Cuff. She would later marry a shell shocked veteran of the Anglo-Irish War who, according to Guinness, hallucinated that his own closets were filled with Sinn Féin gunmen waiting to kill him. is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Paddington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The military term combat stress reaction (CSR) comprises the range of adverse behaviours in reaction to the stress of combat and combat related activities. ... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament... A hallucination is a perception in the absence of a stimulus that the person may or may not believe is real. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ...


The man who believed he was Alec Guinness' biological father, Andrew Geddes, paid for the actor's private school education, but the two never met and the identity of his father continues to be debated.[2]


Career and war service

Guinness first worked writing copy for advertising before making his debut at the Albery Theatre in 1936 at the age of 22, playing the role of Osric in John Gielgud's wildly successful production of Hamlet. During this time he worked with many actors and actresses who would become his friends and frequent co-stars in the future, including John Gielgud, Peggy Ashcroft, Anthony Quayle, and Jack Hawkins. An early influence from afar was Stan Laurel, whom Guinness admired.[3] Advert redirects here. ... Originally known as the New Theatre, the Albery Theatre was built by Charles Wyndham on St. ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an English theatre and film actor. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an English theatre and film actor. ... Dame Peggy Ashcroft DBE (22 December 1907 – 14 June 1991) was an acclaimed Academy Award-winning English actress. ... Anthony Quayle Sir John Anthony Quayle (7 September 1913 – 20 October 1989) was an English actor and director. ... John Edward Jack Hawkins (September 14, 1910 - July 18, 1973) was a British film actor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Stan Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson; 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965) was an English comic actor, writer and director, famous as part of the comedy double act Laurel and Hardy, whose career stretched from the silent films of the early 20th Century until post-World War II. // Stan Laurel...


Guinness continued playing Shakespearean roles throughout his career. In 1937 he played the role of Aumerle in Richard II and Lorenzo in The Merchant of Venice under the direction of John Gielgud. He starred in a 1938 production of Hamlet which won him acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic. He also appeared as Romeo in a production of Romeo and Juliet (1939), Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night and Chorus in Henry V in 1937, both opposite Laurence Olivier, and Ferdinand in The Tempest, opposite Gielgud as Prospero. Shakespeare redirects here. ... Title page of Richard II, from the fifth quarto, published in 1615. ... Shylock and Portia (1835) by Thomas Sully The Merchant of Venice is one of William Shakespeares best-known plays, written sometime between 1596 and 1598. ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an English theatre and film actor. ... The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... °Å#REDIRECT Romeo and Juliet gsgfhasfhhfdhjsehewbbshhhdbfsh ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Twelfth Night, or What You Will is a comedy by William Shakespeare, named after the Twelfth Night holiday of the Christmas season. ... Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Title page of the first quarto (1600) Henry V, also known as The Cronicle History of Henry the fift, is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... For other uses, see The Tempest (disambiguation). ... Prospero and Miranda by William Maw Egley Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Prospero Prospero is the protagonist in The Tempest, a play by William Shakespeare. ...


In 1939, he adapted Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations for the stage, playing the part of Herbert Pocket. The play was a success. One of its viewers was a young British film editor named David Lean, who had Guinness reprise his role in the former's 1946 film adaptation of the play. Dickens redirects here. ... For other uses, see Great Expectations (disambiguation). ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ... Great Expectations is a 1946 British film directed by David Lean and based on the novel by Charles Dickens. ...


Guinness served in the Royal Navy throughout World War II, serving first as a seaman in 1941 and being commissioned the following year. He commanded a landing craft taking part in the invasion of Sicily and Elba and later ferried supplies to the Yugoslav partisans. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Elba (bottom centre) from space, February 1994. ... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ...


During the war, he appeared in Terence Rattigan's West End Play for Bomber Command, Flare Path. He returned to the Old Vic in 1946 and stayed through 1948, playing Abel Drugger in Ben Jonson's The Alchemist, the Fool in King Lear opposite Laurence Olivier in the title role, DeGuiche in Cyrano de Bergerac opposite Ralph Richardson in the title role, and finally starring in an Old Vic production himself as Shakespeare's Richard II. After leaving the Old Vic, he had a success as the Uninvited Guest in the Broadway production of T. S. Eliot's The Cocktail Party (1950, revived at the Edinburgh Festival in 1968), but his second attempt at the title role of Hamlet, this time under his own direction at the New Theatre (1951), proved a major theatrical disaster. Terence Rattigan — British Playwright Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan (June 10, 1911 – November 30, 1977) was one of Englands most important 20th century dramatists. ... Bomber Command is an organizational military unit, generally subordinate to the air force of a country. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ... David Garrick as Abel Drugger in Jonsons The Alchemist by Johann Zoffany. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Cyrano de Bergerac is a play written in 1897 by Edmond Rostand based on the life of the real Cyrano de Bergerac. ... Sir Ralph David Richardson (19 December 1902 – 10 October 1983) was an English actor, one of a group of theatrical knights of the mid-20th century who, though more closely associated with the stage, did their best to make the transition to film. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Title page of Richard II, from the fifth quarto, published in 1615. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ... The Cocktail Party, a play written by T.S. Eliot was first performed at the Edinburgh Festival in 1949. ... The Edinburgh International Festival is a festival of performing arts that takes place in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, over three weeks from around the middle of August. ... Noël Coward Theatre from a postcard, circa 1905. ...

A scene from The Ladykillers, with Guinness third from the left.
A scene from The Ladykillers, with Guinness third from the left.

He was initially mainly associated with the Ealing comedies, and particularly for playing eight different characters in Kind Hearts and Coronets. Other films from this period included The Lavender Hill Mob, The Ladykillers, and The Man in the White Suit. In 1952, director Ronald Neame cast Guinness in his first romantic lead role, opposite Petula Clark in The Card. Image File history File linksMetadata Katie_johnson_ladykillers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Katie_johnson_ladykillers. ... The Ladykillers is a 1955 British film. ... Ealing Studios, a TV and film production company and facilities provider at Ealing Green in West London, claims to be the oldest film studio in the world. ... Kind Hearts and Coronets is a 1949 British black comedy film produced by Ealing Studios. ... The Lavender Hill Mob is a 1951 comedy film from Ealing Studios. ... The Ladykillers is a 1955 British film. ... The Man in the White Suit is a satirical comedy movie made in 1951 by Ealing Studios. ... Ronald Neame is a British film cinematographer, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... Petula Clark and Alec Guinness in the 1952 film The Card originated as a novel by Arnold Bennett. ...


Invited by his friend Tyrone Guthrie to join in the premier season of the Stratford Festival of Canada, Guinness lived for a brief time in Stratford, Ontario. On July 13, 1953, Guinness spoke the first lines of the first play produced by the festival (Shakespeare's Richard III): "Now is the winter of our discontent/Made glorious summer by this son of York." Sir William Tyrone Guthrie (2 July 1900 - 15 May 1971) was a British theatrical director instrumental in the founding of the Stratford Festival of Canada and the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Festival Theatre The Stratford Festival of Canada is a summer-long celebration of theatre held each year in Stratford, Ontario, Canada. ... Stratford is a city on the Avon River in Perth County in southwestern Ontario, Canada with a population of 30,461, according to the 2006 census. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ...


Guinness won particular acclaim for his work with director David Lean. After appearing in Lean's Great Expectations and Oliver Twist, he was given a starring role opposite William Holden in Bridge on the River Kwai. For his performance as Colonel Nicholson, the unyielding British POW leader, Guinness won an Academy Award for Best Actor. Despite a difficult and often hostile relationship, Lean, referring to Guinness as "my good luck charm", continued to cast Guinness in character roles in his later films: Arab leader Prince Feisal in Lawrence of Arabia; the title character's half-brother, Bolshevik leader Yevgraf, in Doctor Zhivago; and Indian mystic Godbole in A Passage to India. He was also offered a role in Lean's adaptation of Ryan's Daughter (1970), but declined. Great Expectations is a 1946 British film directed by David Lean and based on the novel by Charles Dickens. ... Oliver Twist (1948) is the second of David Leans two film adaptations of Charles Dickens novels. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... The Bridge over the River Kwai taken in June 2004. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Faisal bin Husayn (Arabic:فيصل بن حسين May 20, 1883 – September 8, 1933) was for a short while king of Greater Syria in 1920 and king of Iraq from 1921 to 1933. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... Doctor Zhivago (Russian: Доктор Живаго) is a 1965 film directed by David Lean and loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. ... A Passage to India is a 1984 film directed by David Lean, based on the novel of the same name by E. M. Forster. ... Ryans Daughter is David Leans 1970 film which tells the story of an Irish girl who has an affair with a British soldier during World War I, despite opposition from her nationalist neighbours. ...


Other famous roles of this time period included The Swan (1956) with Grace Kelly in her last film role, The Horse's Mouth (1958) in which Guinness played the part of drunken painter Gulley Jimson as well as contributing the screenplay, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium, Tunes of Glory (1960), Damn the Defiant! (1962), The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), The Quiller Memorandum (1966), Scrooge (1970), and the title role in Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973) (which he considered his best film performance). The Swan is a 1956 remake, directed by Charles Vidor, of a 1925 movie about the daughter of a minor branch of a European royal house who is being considered as a wife for her cousin, the heir to the throne. ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... The Horses Mouth is a 1944 novel by Joyce Cary, the third in a trilogy. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Tunes of Glory is a 1960 film directed by Ronald Neame, based on the novel by James Kennaway, centering on events in a Scottish military barracks in the period following World War II. Plot Spoiler warning: The plot concerns the interactions between Major Jock Sinclair (played by Alec Guinness), the... H.M.S. Defiant is a British movie released in 1962 about a mutiny aboard the fictitious ship of the title at around the time of the Spithead Mutiny, starring Alec Guinness and Dirk Bogarde. ... The Fall of the Roman Empire is a 1964 epic film made by Samuel Bronston Productions and The Rank Organisation, and released by Paramount Pictures. ... The Quiller Memorandum (1966) is a cinematic of the 1965 spy novel The Berlin Memorandum, by Adam Hall, (other pseudonyms: Trevor Dudley-Smith; Elleston Trevor), screenplay by Harold Pinter, directed by Michael Anderson, featuring Alec Guinness, George Segal, Max von Sydow, and Senta Berger. ... Scrooge was a 1970 musical film adaptation of Charles Dickens classic 1843 story, A Christmas Carol. ... Hitler: The Last Ten Days is a 1973 film depicting the days leading up to Adolf Hitlers suicide. ...


Guinness turned down roles in many well-received films - most notably The Spy Who Came in From the Cold - for ones that paid him better, although he won a Tony Award for his Broadway triumph as poet Dylan Thomas in Dylan. He followed this success up by playing the title role in Macbeth opposite Simone Signoret at the Royal Court Theatre in 1966, one of the most conspicuous failures of his career. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1965 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by John Le Carre. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Dylan Marlais Thomas (27 October 1914 – 9 November 1953) was a Welsh poet. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... Simone Signoret (March 25, 1920 - September 30, 1985), was an Academy Award-winning French actress. ... The Royal Court Theatre is a non-commercial theatre in Sloane Square, in the Chelsea area of London noted for its contributions to modern theatre. ...


From the 1970s, Guinness made regular television appearances, including the part of George Smiley in the serializations of two novels by John le Carré: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley's People. Le Carré was so impressed by Guinness's performance as Smiley that he based his characterization of Smiley in subsequent novels on Guinness. One of his last appearances was in the acclaimed BBC drama Eskimo Day. Book cover showing Sir Alec Guiness as George Smiley. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is a spy novel by John le Carré, first published in 1974. ... For the article by Neal Stephenson, see Smileys people. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Guinness received his fifth Oscar nomination for his performance in Charles Dickens' Little Dorrit in 1989. He received an honorary Oscar in 1980 "for advancing the art of screen acting through a host of memorable and distinguished performances." Dickens redirects here. ... Little Dorrit is a serial novel by Charles Dickens published originally between 1855 and 1857. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


Star Wars

Guinness in Star Wars Episode IV, 1977
Guinness in Star Wars Episode IV, 1977

Guinness' role as Obi-Wan Kenobi in the original Star Wars trilogy, beginning in 1977, brought him worldwide recognition by a new generation. Guinness agreed to take the part on the condition that he would not have to do publicity to promote the film. He was also one of the few cast members who believed that the film would be a box office hit and negotiated a deal for two percent of the gross, which made him very wealthy in later life. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Obi-Wan Kenobi is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... This article is about the series. ... The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Gross profit or sales profit or gross operating profit is the difference between revenue and the cost of making a product or providing a service, before deducting overheads, payroll, taxation, and interest payments. ...


However, Guinness was never happy with being identified with the part, and expressed great dismay at the fan following the Star Wars trilogy attracted. Nevertheless, in the DVD commentary of Star Wars: A New Hope, director George Lucas mentions that Guinness was not happy about the script re-write in which Obi-Wan is killed. Guinness once said in an interview that he "shrivelled up" every time Star Wars was mentioned to him. However, despite his dislike of the films, fellow cast members Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, and Carrie Fisher (as well as Lucas) have always spoken highly of his courtesy and professionalism on and off the set; he did not let his distaste for the material show to his co-stars. In fact, Lucas credited him with inspiring fellow cast and crew to work harder, saying he was instrumental in helping to complete filming of the movies. George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist. ...


In his autobiography, Blessings In Disguise, Guinness tells an imaginary interviewer "Blessed be Star Wars!", while in the final volume of the book A Positively Final Appearance (1997), he recounts grudgingly giving an autograph to a young fan who claimed to have watched Star Wars over 100 times, on the condition that the fan promised to stop watching the film, because as Guinness put it "this is going to be an ill effect on your life." The fan was stunned at first, but later thanked him. Guinness grew so tired of modern audiences seeming to remember him only for his role of Obi-Wan Kenobi that he would throw away the fan mail he received from Star Wars fans, without reading it.[4]


Personal life

Guinness married the artist, playwright, and actress, Merula Salaman, a British Jew, in 1938, and they had a son in 1940, Matthew Guinness, who later became an actor. Matthew Guinness (June 6, 1940) is a British actor and the son of the famous actor Sir Alec Guinness. ...


Guinness consulted Tarot cards for a time, but came to the conclusion that the symbols of the cards mocked Christianity and Christ. He then burned his cards and shortly afterwards converted to Roman Catholicism.[5]


In his biography Alec Guinness: The Unknown, Garry O'Connor reveals that Guinness was arrested and fined 10 guineas for a homosexual act in a public lavatory in Liverpool in 1946. Guinness avoided publicity by giving his name as Herbert Pocket to both police and court. The name Herbert Pocket was taken from the character in Charles Dickens' Great Expectations that Guinness had played on stage in 1939 and was also about to play in the film adaptation. The incident did not become public knowledge until April 2001, eight months after his death. For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... April 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy spyplane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ...


While serving in the Royal Navy, Guinness for a while planned on becoming an Anglican minister. In 1954, however, during the shooting of the film Father Brown, Alec and Merula Guinness were formally received into the Roman Catholic Church. They would remain devout and regular church-goers for the remainder of their lives. Their son Matthew had converted to Catholicism some time earlier.[6][7] Every morning, Guinness recited a verse from Psalm 143, "Cause me to hear your loving kindness in the morning".[8] This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... A minister can mean several things: A government minister is a politician who heads a government ministry A minister of religion is a member of the clergy A minister is the rank of diplomat directly below ambassador This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages... Father Brown (The Detective in the United States) is a 1954 mystery comedy film. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi) (originally meaning songs sung to a harp, from psallein play on a stringed instrument, Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ...


Death

Guinness died on August 5, 2000, from liver cancer, at Midhurst in West Sussex.[9] He had been receiving hospital treatment for glaucoma, and had recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer. He was interred in Petersfield, Hampshire, England. Merula Guinness died of cancer two months later [10] and was interred alongside her husband of 62 years. is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Hepatic tumors are tumors or growths on or in the liver (medical terms pertaining to the liver often start in hepato- or hepatic from the Greek word for liver, hepar). ... , Midhurst is a market town in the English county of West Sussex, with a population of approximately 5000. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... HRPC redirects here. ... Petersfield is a market town in the English county of Hampshire, situated on the northern border of the South Downs. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


Encounter with James Dean

In September 1955, Guinness met with the actor James Dean, then filming Rebel Without A Cause, who was showing off his new car, a Porsche 550 Spyder. Guinness said he had a premonition that Dean would die behind its wheel;[11] later that month, Dean was killed in a collision with another car. For the film, see James Dean (film). ... Rebel Without a Cause is a 1955 film directed by Nicholas Ray that tells the story of a rebellious teenager who comes to a new town, meets a girl, defies his parents, and faces the local high school bullies. ... This article is about the auto company. ...


Awards and honours

Guinness won the Academy Award as Best Actor in 1957 for his role in Bridge on the River Kwai. He was nominated in 1958 for his screenplay adapted from Joyce Cary's novel The Horse's Mouth and for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Obi-Wan Kenobi in 1977. He also received an Academy Honorary Award for lifetime achievement in 1980. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Bridge over the River Kwai taken in June 2004. ... Time magazine cover featuring Joyce Cary, October 20, 1952 This article is about the male author Joyce Cary. ... The Horses Mouth is a 1944 novel by Joyce Cary, the third in a trilogy. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ...


He was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1955, and was knighted in 1959. He became a Companion of Honour in 1994 at the age of 80. Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ...


He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1559 Vine Street. Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ...


Writings

Guinness wrote three volumes of a bestselling autobiography, beginning with Blessings in Disguise in 1985, followed by My Name Escapes Me in 1996, and A Positively Final Appearance in 1999. His authorised biography was written by his close friend, British novelist Piers Paul Read. It was published in 2003. Piers Paul Read (born March 7, 1941 in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, UK) is a novelist and non-fiction British writer and author. ...


Filmography

Year Title Role Notes
1934 Evensong Extra (WWI soldier in audience) uncredited
1946 Great Expectations Herbert Pocket
1948 Oliver Twist Fagin
1949 Kind Hearts and Coronets The Duke, The Banker, The Parson, The General, The Admiral, Young Ascoyne, Young Henry, Lady Agatha
A Run for Your Money Whimple
1950 Last Holiday George Bird
The Mudlark Benjamin Disraeli
1951 The Lavender Hill Mob Henry Holland
The Man in the White Suit Sidney Stratton
1952 The Card Edward Henry ‘Denry’ Machin
1953 The Square Mile narrator short subject
Malta Story Flight Lt. Peter Ross
The Captain's Paradise Capt. Henry St. James
1954 Father Brown Father Brown
The Stratford Adventure narrator short subject
1955 Rowlandson's England narrator short subject
To Paris with Love Col. Sir Edgar Fraser
The Prisoner The Cardinal
The Ladykillers Professor Marcus
1956 The Swan Prince Albert
1957 The Bridge on the River Kwai Col. Nicholson Academy Award for Best Actor
Barnacle Bill Captain William Horatio Ambrose released in the US as All at Sea
1958 The Horse's Mouth Gulley Jimson also writer
1959 Our Man in Havana Jim Wormold
The Scapegoat John Barratt/Jacques De Gue
1960 Tunes of Glory Maj. Jock Sinclair, D.S.O., M.M.
1962 A Majority of One Koichi Asano
HMS Defiant Captain Crawford
Lawrence of Arabia Prince Feisal
1964 The Fall of the Roman Empire Marcus Aurelius
1965 Pasternak Himself short subject
Situation Hopeless... But Not Serious Wilhelm Frick
Doctor Zhivago Gen. Yevgraf Zhivago
1966 Hotel Paradiso Benedict Boniface
The Quiller Memorandum Pol
1967 The Comedians in Africa Himself uncredited, short subject
The Comedians Major H.O. Jones
1970 Cromwell King Charles I
Scrooge Jacob Marley’s ghost
1972 Brother Sun, Sister Moon Pope Innocent III
1973 Hitler: The Last Ten Days Adolf Hitler
1976 Murder by Death Jamesir Bensonmum
1978 Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope Ben Obi-Wan Kenobi
The Star Wars Holiday Special Ben Obi-Wan Kenobi (stock footage from A New Hope)
1980 Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back Ben Obi-Wan Kenobi
Raise the Titanic John Bigalow
Little Lord Fauntleroy Earl of Dorincourt
1983 Lovesick Sigmund Freud
Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Ben Obi-Wan Kenobi
1984 A Passage to India Professor Godbole
1988 'Little Dorrit William Dorrit
A Handful of Dust Mr. Todd
1991 Kafka The Chief Clerk
1993 A Foreign Field Amos
1994 Mute Witness The Reaper

See also: 1933 in film 1934 1935 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 26 - Samuel Goldwyn (of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) finally purchased the film rights to The Wizard of Oz from Frank J. Baum for $40,000. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... Great Expectations is a 1946 British film directed by David Lean and based on the novel by Charles Dickens. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Oliver Twist (1948) is the second of David Leans two film adaptations of Charles Dickens novels. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... Kind Hearts and Coronets is a 1949 British black comedy film produced by Ealing Studios. ... A Run for Your Money is a 1949 Ealing Studios comedy film starring Donald Houston and Meredith Edwards as two Welshmen visiting London for the first time. ... See also: 1949 in film 1950 1951 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events February 15 - Walt Disney Studios animated film Cinderella debuts. ... Last Holiday is a 1950 British film featuring Alec Guinness in his sixth starring role. ... The Mudlark, made in England in 1950 by 20th Century Fox, is a completely fictionalized account of how Queen Victoria was eventually brought out of her mourning for Prince Albert. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... The Lavender Hill Mob is a 1951 comedy film from Ealing Studios. ... The Man in the White Suit is a satirical comedy movie made in 1951 by Ealing Studios. ... // Events February 20 - The film The African Queen opens (Capitol Theater in New York City). ... Petula Clark and Alec Guinness in the 1952 film The Card originated as a novel by Arnold Bennett. ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ... // Film Malta Story (1953) Malta Story is a B/W war film on the heroic defense of Malta, the island itself its people and the RAF aviators who fought to defend it. ... The Captains Paradise is a 1953 British film comedy starring Alec Guinness and directed by Anthony Kimmins. ... The year 1954 in film involved some significant events. ... Father Brown (The Detective in the United States) is a 1954 mystery comedy film. ... The year 1955 in film involved some significant events. ... The Ladykillers is a 1955 British film. ... The year 1956 in film involved some significant events. ... The Swan is a 1956 remake, directed by Charles Vidor, of a 1925 movie about the daughter of a minor branch of a European royal house who is being considered as a wife for her cousin, the heir to the throne. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Barnacle Bill (released in the U.S. as All at Sea) is a 1957 Ealing Studios comedy film, starring Alec Guinness as an unsuccessful navy man as well as six of his maritime ancestors. ... The year 1958 in film involved some significant events. ... The Horses Mouth is a 1958 film about a London artist trying to paint his grand vision. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... Our Man in Havana is a 1959 film directed by Carol Reed and starring Alec Guinness, Burl Ives, Maureen OHara and Ernie Kovacs. ... The Scapegoat is a 1959 crime film based on the novel of the same name by Daphne du Maurier, and starring Alec Guinness, Nicole Maurey and Bette Davis. ... See also: 1959 in film 1960 1961 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film // Events April 20 - for the first time since coming home from military service in Germany, Elvis Presley returns to Hollywood, California to film G.I. Blues August 10 - Filming of West... Tunes of Glory is a 1960 film directed by Ronald Neame, based on the novel by James Kennaway, centering on events in a Scottish military barracks in the period following World War II. Plot Spoiler warning: The plot concerns the interactions between Major Jock Sinclair (played by Alec Guinness), the... // Events Dr. No launches the James Bond film series, the longest-running motion picture franchise of all time, running more than 40 years. ... A Majority of One is a play by Leonard Spigelgass. ... HMS Defiant is a British movie released in 1962 about a general mutiny in the British Grand Fleet, starring Alec Guiness and Dirk Bogarde. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... The Fall of the Roman Empire is a 1964 epic film made by Samuel Bronston Productions and The Rank Organisation, and released by Paramount Pictures. ... // Events Top grossing films North America Mary Poppins The Sound of Music, starring Julie Andrews Goldfinger My Fair Lady Whats New Pussycat? Shenandoah The Sandpiper Father Goose Academy Awards Best Picture: The Sound of Music - Argyle, Twentieth Century-Fox Best Actor: Lee Marvin - Cat Ballou Best Actress: Julie Christie... Pasternak (Пастернак: Russian, means Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa Linn. ... Situation Hopeless. ... Doctor Zhivago (Russian: Доктор Живаго) is a 1965 film directed by David Lean and loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. ... // Events Top grossing films North America Thunderball Dr. Zhivago Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? That Darn Cat! The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming Academy Awards Best Picture: A Man for All Seasons - Highland, Columbia Best Actor: Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons Best Actress: Elizabeth Taylor... The Quiller Memorandum (1966) is a cinematic of the 1965 spy novel The Berlin Memorandum, by Adam Hall, (other pseudonyms: Trevor Dudley-Smith; Elleston Trevor), screenplay by Harold Pinter, directed by Michael Anderson, featuring Alec Guinness, George Segal, Max von Sydow, and Senta Berger. ... Lauren steiger, born in 1992 at Royal Womens hospital started acting and modelling at the age of 2 and is now currently 15 working in Milan on the catwalks. ... The Comedians is a novel by Graham Greene, first published in 1966. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... Cromwell is a 1970 film, based on the life of Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector of Great Britain. ... Scrooge was a 1970 musical film adaptation of Charles Dickens classic 1843 story, A Christmas Carol. ... // Top grossing films The Godfather Fiddler on the Roof Diamonds Are Forever Whats Up, Doc?, starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan ONeal Dirty Harry The Last Picture Show A Clockwork Orange Cabaret, starring Liza Minnelli The Hospital Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex Academy Awards Best Picture... Graham Faulkner as Francesco, or Francis Franco Zeffirellis Brother Sun, Sister Moon (1972), conceived and executed in much the same visual manner as his Oscar winning Romeo and Juliet (1968), attempts to draw parallels between the work and philosophy of Francis of Assisi and the ideology that underpinned the... // Events The Marx Brothers Zeppo Marx divorces his second wife, Barbara Blakely. ... Hitler: The Last Ten Days is a 1973 film depicting the days leading up to Adolf Hitlers suicide. ... // Events March 22 - Filming begins on George Lucas Star Wars science fiction film. ... Murder by Death is a 1976 ensemble comedy movie, written by Neil Simon and directed by Robert Moore. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... The Star Wars Holiday Special was a two-hour television special (including commercials) set in the Star Wars galaxy. ... The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... Clive Cussler is an American adventure novelist. ... Little Lord Fauntleroy is a sentimental childrens novel by American (English-born) author Frances Hodgson Burnett, serialized in St. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Lovesick is a movie filmed in 1983. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... A Passage to India is a 1984 film directed by David Lean, based on the novel of the same name by E. M. Forster. ... // Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun... Little Dorrit is a serial novel by Charles Dickens published originally between 1855 and 1857. ... A Handful of Dust is a novel by Evelyn Waugh published in 1934. ... The year 1991 in film involved many significant films. ... Kafka is a film based on the life of writer Franz Kafka. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... A Foreign Field (1993) is a motion picture about British and American World War II veterans returning to the beaches of Normandy as old men. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ...

Notes

  1. ^ GRO Register of Births: JUN 1914 1a 39 PADDINGTON - Alec Guinness De Cuffe, mmn = De Cuffe
  2. ^ Alec Guinness biography at MSN Movies. Retrieved on 2007-07-29.
  3. ^ On June 3, 1961, Alec Guinness sent a letter to Stan Laurel,[1] acknowledging that he had unconsciously modeled his portrayal of Sir Andrew Aguecheek as he imagined Laurel might have done. Guinness was 23 at the time he was performing in Twelfth Night, so this would have been around 1937, by which time Laurel had become an international movie star.
  4. ^ The shy introvert who shone on screen. The Guardian (Monday August 7, 2000).
  5. ^ X-Rated: The Paranormal Experiences of The Movie Star Greats by Michael Munn, pg. 93., Robson Books, 1999
  6. ^ Rita Reichardt (Monday August 7, 2000). How Father Brown Led Sir Alec Guinness to the Church. Catholic Answers, Inc..
  7. ^ Tom Sutcliffe (Monday August 7, 2000). Sir Alec Guinness (1914-2000). The Guardian.
  8. ^ The invisible man, by Hugh Davies, originally published in the Telegraph and reprinted in The Sunday Age, 13 August 2000.
  9. ^ GRO Register of Deaths: AUG 2000 1DD 21 CHICHESTER - Alec Guinness, DoB = 2 Apr 1914 aged 86
  10. ^ GRO Register of Deaths: OCT 2000 38C 104 PETERSFIELD - Merula Sylvia (Lady) Guinness, DoB = 16 Oct 1914 aged 86
  11. ^ Olga Craig (September 24, 2005). Revealed: the truth behind the crash that killed James Dean. telegraph.co.uk.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Stan Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson; 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965) was an English comic actor, writer and director, famous as part of the comedy double act Laurel and Hardy, whose career stretched from the silent films of the early 20th Century until post-World War II. // Stan Laurel... Twelfth Night has at least three meanings: Twelfth Night (holiday), celebrated by some Christians Twelfth Night, or What You Will, a comedic play by William Shakespeare Twelfth Night (band), a progressive rock band This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Catholic Answers, based in El Cajon, California, is one of the largest lay-run apostolates of Catholic apologetics and evangelization in the United States. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Awards
Preceded by
Yul Brynner
for The King and I
Academy Award for Best Actor
1957
for The Bridge on the River Kwai
Succeeded by
David Niven
for Separate Tables
Preceded by
Kirk Douglas
for Lust for Life
NYFCC Award for Best Actor
1957
for The Bridge on the River Kwai
Succeeded by
David Niven
for Separate Tables
Preceded by
Arthur Hill
for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play
1964
for Dylan
Succeeded by
Walter Matthau
for The Fortune Cookie
Persondata
NAME Guinness, Alec
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Sir Alec Guiness; Alec Guinness de Cuffe
SHORT DESCRIPTION English actor
DATE OF BIRTH April 2, 1914
PLACE OF BIRTH Marylebone, London, England
DATE OF DEATH August 5, 2000
PLACE OF DEATH Midhurst, Sussex, England

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alec Guinness (956 words)
Alec Guinness With Grace Kelly in "The Swan" (From "Alec Guinness")
Whether this is all merely a matter of the higher gossip or points to things deep in Guinness cannot be known, and indeed no one appears to have claimed to have had a homosexual encounter or relationship with him.
It was my good fortune to be in London in the winter of 1989 and to acquire a ticket for "A Walk in the Woods," the two-character play in which he and Edward Herrmann starred.
Alec Guinness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1327 words)
Sir Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (April 2, 1914 – August 5, 2000) was an Oscar-winning English actor who became one of the most versatile and best-loved performers of his generation.
Guinness was also a talented dramatic and character actor, and won particular acclaim for his work with director David Lean.
Sir Alec Guinness died on August 5, 2000, at the age of 86, from liver cancer, at Midhurst in West Sussex.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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