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Encyclopedia > Aldhun of Durham

Aldhun of Durham (died 1018) was the last Bishop of Lindisfarne and the first Bishop of Durham. Events Bulgaria becomes part of the Byzantine Empire. ... The episcopal see of Lindisfarne was founded in 635 by Saint Aidan. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ...


Since the late 9th century the See of Lindisfarne was based in Chester-le-Street because of constant attacks from invading Danes. However in 994 the King of England had paid a Danegeld (protection money) to the King of Denmark and the King of Norway in return for peace. The pay-off worked and there followed a period of freedom from Viking raids. This encouraged Aldhun to return the remains of Saint Cuthbert to their original resting place at Lindisfarne, and to reinstate the See there. As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Lindisfarne Castle Lindisfarne (Grid reference NU125421, , ), also called Holy Island (variant spelling, Lindesfarne), is a tidal island off the north-east coast of England, which is connected to the mainland of Northumberland by a causeway and is cut off twice a day by tides — something well described by Sir Walter... Chester-le-Street is a market town in County Durham, England with a history going back to Roman times. ... Events Otto III reaches his majority and begins to rule Germany in his own right. ... Ethelred II or Æþelræd Unræd (c. ... The Danegeld was an English tax raised to pay off Viking raiders (usually led by the Danish king) to save the land from being ravaged by the raiders. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Olaf Tryggvason has been elected king, a painting by Peter Nicolai Arbo Olaf Tryggvason (969–September 9? 1000) (Old Norse: Óláfr Tryggvason, Norwegian: Olav Tryggvason) was son of Tryggve Olafsson, king of Viken (Vingulmark and Ranrike), and great-grandson of Harald Fairhair. ... Vikings were a Norwegian, Icelandic, Danish and Swedish people who lived around the coasts of Scandinavia and raided, besides others in their very homelands, the coasts of the British Isles, and other parts of Europe from the late 8th century to the 11th century. ... Cuthbert of Lindisfarne (ca. ...


En route to their destination however Aldhun claimed to have received a vision from Saint Cuthbert saying that the saint's remains should be laid to rest at Durham. The monks detoured then to Durham, and the title Bishop of Lindisfarne was transferred to Bishop of Durham. Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ...

Preceded by:
Elfdig
Bishop of Lindisfarne
990 - 995
Succeeded by:
--
Preceded by:
--
Bishop of Durham
995 - 1018
Succeeded by:
Eadmund

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aldhun of Durham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (186 words)
Aldhun of Durham (died 1018) was the last Bishop of Lindisfarne and the first Bishop of Durham.
En route to their destination however Aldhun claimed to have received a vision from Saint Cuthbert saying that the saint's remains should be laid to rest at Durham.
The monks detoured then to Durham, and the title Bishop of Lindisfarne was transferred to Bishop of Durham.
Durham (Dunelmum) (2088 words)
The council was in origin a feudal body, chosen from the bishop's immediate followers and officials, the functions entrusted to it being the general administration of the palatinate, financial affairs, and the duty of advising the bishop.
The Benedictines held Durham Abbey, with the dependent houses of Jarrow, Wearmouth, and Finchale.
Durham College (now Trinity), at Oxford, was greatly protected and helped by various bishops and priors of Durham, and possibly was originally a Durham foundation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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