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Encyclopedia > Aldhelm, Bishop of Sherborne
Saint Aldhelm

Stained glass window showing Aldhelm, installed in Malmesbury Abbey in 1928 in memory of Rev. Canon C. D. H. McMillan, Vicar of Malmesbury from 1907 to 1919
Abbot & Bishop
Born c. 639 in Wessex
Died 25 May 709 in Doulting, Somerset
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church; Anglican Communion
Major shrine Malmesbury Abbey, now destroyed.
Feast 25 May
Attributes monk playing a harp; or bishop with staff sprouting ash leaves
Patronage Malmesbury; Sherborne; musicians; song writers
Saints Portal

Saint Aldhelm (c. 639-25 May 709), Abbot of Malmesbury, Bishop of Sherborne, Latin poet and Anglo-Saxon literature scholar, was born before the middle of the 7th century. He is said to have been the son of Kenten, who was of the royal house of Wessex. He was certainly not, as Aldhelm's early biographer Faritius asserts, the brother of King Ine. Download high resolution version (1300x1650, 273 KB) Stained glass window showing Aldhelm, installed in Malmesbury Abbey in 1928 in memory of Rev. ... Abbots coat of arms The word abbot, meaning father, has been used as a Christian clerical title in various, mainly monastic, meanings. ... Two bishops assist at the Exhumation of Saint Hubert, who was a bishop too, at the église Saint-Pierre in Liège. ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... Map of the British Isles circa 802 Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the Kingdom of England. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Events Saelred becomes king of Essex Ceolred becomes king of Mercia after his cousin Cenred abdicates to become a monk in Rome A storm separates the Channel Islands of Jethou and Herm Births Emperor Konin of Japan Deaths May 25 - Aldhelm, bishop and scholar Categories: 709 ... Doulting is a village and civil parish 1½ mile E. of Shepton Mallet, in the Mendip district of Somerset, England. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins and sees itself as the same Church founded by Jesus and maintained through Apostolic Succession from the Twelve Apostles. ... The term Anglican (from medieval Latin ecclesia Anglicana meaning the English church) is used to describe the people, institutions, and churches as well as the liturgical traditions and theological concepts developed by the established Church of England, the Anglican Communion and the Continuing Anglican Churches (a loosely affiliated group of... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Malmesbury Abbey, at Malmesbury in Wiltshire, England, was founded as a Benedictine monastery in c. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Symbology of the Saints The Catholic Church has used symbols from its very beginnings. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... Malmesbury is an old-established south Cotswold town in south west England in the county of Wiltshire. ... See also: Sherborne, Gloucestershire Sherborne is an affluent market town in north west Dorset, England, situated on the River Yeo and A30 road, on the edge of the Blackmore Vale six miles east of Yeovil. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Events Dagobert I succeeded by Clovis II as king of the Franks in Neustria and Burgundy During the Islamic conquest of Persia, Susa is destroyed Births Deaths Pippin I of Landen, father of Gertrude of Nivelles Categories: 639 ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Events Saelred becomes king of Essex Ceolred becomes king of Mercia after his cousin Cenred abdicates to become a monk in Rome A storm separates the Channel Islands of Jethou and Herm Births Emperor Konin of Japan Deaths May 25 - Aldhelm, bishop and scholar Categories: 709 ... Malmesbury is an old-established south Cotswold town in south west England in the county of Wiltshire. ... Arms of the Bishop of Salisbury The Bishop of Salisbury is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Salisbury in the Province of Canterbury. ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle, likely scribed around 1150, is one of the major sources of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Map of the British Isles circa 802 Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the Kingdom of England. ... Faritius (also known as Faricius) was Abbot of Abingdon in the 12th century. ... Ine (died 728) was the King of Wessex from 688 to 726, noted particularly for his code of laws. ...


Aldhelm received his first education in the school of an Irish scholar and monk, Maildulf (also Maeldubh or Meldun) (died c. 675), who had settled in the British stronghold of Bladon (or Bladow) on the site of the town called Mailduberi, Maldubesburg, Meldunesburg, etc., and finally Malmesbury, after him. Bladon is a village and civil parish in the West Oxfordshire district of Oxfordshire, England. ... The Market Cross, the Abbey and the main shopping street. ...


In 668, Pope Vitalian sent Theodore of Tarsus to be Archbishop of Canterbury. At the same time the African scholar Hadrian, became abbot of St Augustine's at Canterbury. Aldhelm was one of his disciples, for he addresses him as the 'venerable preceptor of my rude childhood.' He must, nevertheless, have been thirty years of age when he began to study with Hadrian. His studies included Roman law, astronomy, astrology, the art of reckoning and the difficulties of the calendar. He learned, according to the doubtful statements of the early lives, both Greek and Hebrew. He certainly introduces many Latinized Greek words into his works. Vitalianus (died January 27, 672) was Pope from 657 - 672. ... Theodore (602–September 19, 690) was the eighth archbishop of Canterbury. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Statistics Population: 42,258 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TR145575 Administration District: City of Canterbury Shire county: Kent Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Ambulance service: South East Coast Post office and... Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome. ... Hebrew redirects here. ...


Ill health compelled him to leave Canterbury, and he returned to Malmesbury, where he was a monk under Maildulf for fourteen years, dating probably from 661, and including the period of his studies with Hadrian. When Maildulf died, Aldhelm was appointed in 675, according to a charter of doubtful authenticity cited by William of Malmesbury, by Leutherius, Bishop of Dorchester (671-676), to succeed to the direction of the monastery, of which he became the first abbot. William of Malmesbury (c. ... The Bishop of Dorchester was the head of the Anglo-Saxon Roman Catholic diocese of Dorchester, with his seat, or cathedra, at the cathedral in Dorchester-on-Thames in Oxfordshire. ...


Aldhelm introduced the Benedictine rule, and secured the right of the election of the abbot to the monks themselves. The community at Malmesbury increased, and Aldhelm was able to found two other monasteries as centres of learning, at Frome, Somerset and at Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire. The little church of St Lawrence at Bradford on Avon dates back to his time, and may safely be regarded as his. At Malmesbury he built a new church to replace Maildulf's modest building, and obtained considerable grants of land for the monastery. St. ... Statistics Population: 24,510 (2001 census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST775477 Administration District: Mendip Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: Somerset Ambulance: South Western... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... The Town Bridge over the river Avon. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ...

Wall plaque at the Catholic Church of St Aldhelm, Malmesbury. The inscription says 'St Aldhelm 639-709, Abbot of Malmesbury and Bishop of Sherborne, Latin Poet and Ecclesiastical Writer.'
Wall plaque at the Catholic Church of St Aldhelm, Malmesbury. The inscription says 'St Aldhelm 639-709, Abbot of Malmesbury and Bishop of Sherborne, Latin Poet and Ecclesiastical Writer.'

His fame as a scholar spread to other countries. Artwil, the son of an Irish king, submitted his writings for Aldhelm's approval, and Cellanus, an Irish monk from Peronne, was one of his correspondents. Aldhelm was the first Anglo-Saxon, so far as we know, to write in Latin verse, and his letter to Acircius (Aldfrith or Eadfrith, king of Northumbria) is a treatise on Latin prosody for the use of his countrymen. In this work he included his most famous productions, 101 riddles in Latin hexameters. Each of them is a complete picture, and one of them runs to 83 lines. Download high resolution version (1008x1365, 377 KB) Wall plaque at the Catholic Church of St Aldhelm, Malmesbury. ... Download high resolution version (1008x1365, 377 KB) Wall plaque at the Catholic Church of St Aldhelm, Malmesbury. ... Péronne is the name or part of the name of several communes in France: Péronne, in the Saône-et-Loire département Péronne, in the Somme département Péronne-en-Mélantois, in the Nord département This is a disambiguation page, a list of... Aldfrith (died December 14, 704) was a King of Northumbria (685 - 704). ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... A riddle is a form of word puzzle designed to test someones ingenuity and lateral thinking in arriving at a solution. ...


That his merits as a scholar were early recognized in his own country is shown by the encomium of Bede (Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum 5.18), who speaks of him as a wonder of erudition. His fame reached Italy, and at the request of Pope Sergius I he paid a visit to Rome, of which, however, there is no notice in his extant writings. On his return, bringing with him privileges for his monastery and a magnificent altar, he received a popular ovation. Depiction of Bede from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493. ... Folio 3v from Codex Beda Petersburgiensis (746) The Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (in English: Ecclesiastical History of the English People) is a work in Latin by the Venerable Bede on the history of the Church in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between Roman... Sergius I (d. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,500 km²  (580 sq mi...


He was deputed by a synod of the church in Wessex to remonstrate with the Britons of Dumnonia (Devon and Cornwall) on their differences from the Roman practice in the shape of the tonsure and the date of Easter. This he did in a long and rather acrimonious letter to their king Geraint (Geruntius) achieving ultimate agreement with Rome. Brython and Brythonic are terms which refer to indigenous, pre-Roman, Celtic speaking inhabitants of most of the island of Great Britain, and their cultures and languages, the Brythonic languages. ... Dumnonia was a Brythonic kingdom of sub-Roman Britain, located in the south-west peninsula of modern England and covering Cornwall, Devon, most of Somerset and possibly part of Dorset. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... Easter, also known as Pascha (Greek Πάσχα: Passover), the Feast of the Resurrection, the Sunday of the Resurrection, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christian liturgical year, observed between late March and late April (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity). ... Geraint was a King of Dumnonia who ruled in the early eighth century. ...


In 705, or perhaps earlier, Haeddi, bishop of Winchester, died, and the diocese was divided into two parts. Sherborne was the new see, of which Aldhelm reluctantly became the first bishop. He wished to resign the abbey of Malmesbury which he had governed for thirty years, but yielding to the remonstrances of the monks he continued to direct it until his death. He was now an old man, but he showed great activity in his new functions. The cathedral church which he built at Sherborne, though replaced later by a Norman church, is described by William of Malmesbury. Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... See also: Sherborne, Gloucestershire Sherborne is an affluent market town in north west Dorset, England, situated on the River Yeo and A30 road, on the edge of the Blackmore Vale six miles east of Yeovil. ...


Aldhelm was on his rounds in his diocese when he died in the church of Doulting on May 25, 709. The body was taken to Malmesbury, and crosses were set up by his friend, Bishop Ecgwine of Worcester, at the various stopping-places. He was buried in the church of St Michael. His biographers relate miracles due to his sanctity worked during his lifetime and at his shrine. Doulting is a village and civil parish 1½ mile E. of Shepton Mallet, in the Mendip district of Somerset, England. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... The city of Worcester (pronounced Wuh-ster) is the county town of Worcestershire in England; the river Severn runs through the middle, with the citys large Worcester Cathedral overlooking the river. ...


According to William of Malmesbury, Aldhelm wrote poetry in Anglo-Saxon also, and set his own compositions to music, but none of his songs, which were still popular in the time of Alfred, have come down to us. Finding his people slow to come to church, he is said to have stood at the end of a bridge singing songs in the vernacular, thus collecting a crowd to listen to exhortations on sacred subjects. Aldhelm wrote in elaborate and grandiloquent and very difficult Latin, which became the dominant Latin style for centuries, though eventually came to be regarded as barbarous. His works became standard school texts in monastic schools, until his influence declined around the time of the Norman Conquest. William of Malmesbury (c. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Aldhelm's collected works were edited by R. Ehwald, Aldhelmi opera omnia (Berlin, 1919). An earlier edition by J. A. Giles, Patres eccl. Angl. (Oxford, 1844) was reprinted by JP Migne in his Patrologiae Cursus, vol. 89 (1850). The letter to Geraint, king of Domnonia, was supposed to have been destroyed by the Britons (William of Malmesbury, Gesta Pontificum, p. 361), but was discovered with others of Aldhelm's in the correspondence of St Boniface, archbishop of Mainz. A long letter to Eahfrid, a scholar just returned from Ireland (first printed in Usher, Veterum Epistt. Hiber. Sylloge, 1632), is of interest as casting light on the relations between English and Irish scholars. Jacques Paul Migne (25 October 1800 - 25 October 1875) was a French priest who published inexpensive and widely-distributed editions of theological works, encyclopedias and the texts of the Church Fathers. ... The Patrologia Latina is an enormous work published by Jacques-Paul Migne between 1844 and 1855, with indices published between 1862 and 1865. ... For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. ...


Aldhelm's best-known work is the De Laude Virginitatis, a Latin treatise on virginity addressed to the nuns of the double monastery at Barking. After a long preface extolling the merits of virginity, he commemorates a great number of male and female saints. Aldhelm later wrote a poetic version, which closes with a battle of the virtues against the vices, the De octo principalibus vitiis(first printed by Delrio, Mainz, 1601).


The chief source of his Epistola ad Acircium sive liber de septenario, et de metris, aenigmatibus ac pedum regulis (ed. A. Mai, Class. Auct. vol. v.) is Priscian. For the riddles included in it, his model was the collection known as Symposii aenigmata. The acrostic introduction gives the sentence, 'Aldhelmus cecinit millenis versibus odas,' whether read from the initial or final letters of the lines. His minor Latin poems include one on the dedication of a basilica built by Bugge (or Edburga of Minster), a royal lady of the house of Wessex. Priscian (Priscianus Caesariensisi), the celebrated Latin grammarian, lived about A.D. 500, i. ...


Reference

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External link

  • Early British Kingdoms: St. Aldhelm, Bishop of Sherborne
Religious Posts
Preceded by
"Diocese created"
Bishop of Sherborne
705–710
Succeeded by
Fordhere

  Results from FactBites:
 
St. Aldhelm (950 words)
Aldhelm himself attributes his progress in letters to the famous Adrian, a native of Roman Africa, but formerly a monk of Monte Cassino, who came to England in the train of Archbishop Theodore and was made Abbot of St. Augustine's, Canterbury.
This treatise, in imitation of Sedulius, Aldhelm afterwards versified.
We are struck by the writer's earnest devotion to the Mother of God, by the veneration paid to the saints, and notably to St. Peter, "the key-bearer," by the importance attached to the holy sacrifice of the Mass, and to prayer for the dead, and by the esteem in which he held the monastic profession.
Aldhelm, Bishop of Sherborne (1154 words)
When Maildulf died, Aldhelm was appointed in 675, according to a charter of doubtful authenticity cited by William of Malmesbury, by Leutherius, bishop of Dorchester from 671 to 676, to succeed to the direction of the monastery, of which he became the first abbot.
Aldhelm was the first Anglo-Saxon, so far as we know, to write in Latin verse, and his letter to Acircius (Aldfrith[?] or Eadfrith, king of Northumbria) is a treatise on Latin prosody for the use of his countrymen.
Aldhelm was on his rounds in his diocese when he died in the church of Doulting on May 25, 709.
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