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Encyclopedia > Alcohol laws of Missouri
Location of Missouri
Flag of the State of Missouri

Although fairly comprehensive, the alcohol laws of Missouri are among the most permissive in the United States, perhaps only behind those of Nevada and Louisiana. Missouri is widely known for this approach throughout the Midwest, in sharp contrast to some of its neighboring states, like Kansas (see Alcohol laws of Kansas), Oklahoma (see Alcohol laws of Oklahoma), Arkansas, and Nebraska. Public domain map courtesy of The General Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin, modified to highlight state boundaries. ... Public domain map courtesy of The General Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin, modified to highlight state boundaries. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Missouri. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Missouri. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Flag of the State of Kansas The alcohol laws of Kansas are among the strictest in the United States, in sharp contrast to its neighboring state of Missouri (see Alcohol laws of Missouri), but much like (though still stricter than) its other neighboring state of Oklahoma (see Alcohol laws of... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Oklahoma defines low-point beer as any beverage containing between 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ...


As discussed in this article, Missouri's lax alcohol regime includes:

  • no differentiation of liquor laws based on alcohol percentage;
  • no statewide criminal prohibition on public intoxication, as well as a provision forbidding local jurisdictions from enacting criminal public intoxication laws;
  • no prohibition on the manufacture, importation, sale, transportation, possession, or consumption of absinthe;
  • no statewide vehicle open container law, thereby allowing passengers in motor vehicles (but not drivers) to consume alcohol openly, although 31 of Missouri's smaller municipalities do have local vehicle open container laws;
  • no statewide precise locations for selling liquor off-premises (thus allowing even gas stations to sell hard liquor);
  • no alcohol blue laws;
  • no prohibition on consumption by minors (although purchase, possession, and intoxication by minors is prohibited);
  • 3:00 AM bar closing hours in St. Louis, Kansas City, and their surrounding areas;
  • a provision preempting local jurisdictions from superseding the state alcohol laws, allowing them only to pass local laws which are the same as state law;
  • a provision specifically prohibiting counties and cities from banning the retail sale of liquor;
  • a provision permitting open containers in public in Downtown Kansas City entertainment districts;
  • a provision allowing Missourians over 21 to manufacture up to 100 gallons of any alcohol for personal use each year, without any futher limitation, license, or taxation;
  • and a provision allowing parents and guardians to furnish alcohol to their children (although not to the level of neglect or abuse).

Contents

Public intoxication, also known as drunk and disorderly conduct (sometimes, incorrectly, as drunken disorderly), is a summary offence in many countries. ... A reservoir glass filled with a naturally-colored verte, next to an absinthe spoon. ... Open container laws are US laws which prohibit possessing and/or drinking from a open container of alcohol in certain areas. ... Modern gas station A filling station, gas station or petrol station is a facility that sells fuel for road motor vehicles – usually petrol (US: gas/gasoline), diesel fuel and LPG. The term gas station is mostly particular to the United States of America and Canada, where petrol is known... This article is about laws created to enforce moral standards. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... View from atop the Liberty Memorial; The Loop and Crossroads skyline, Crown Center isnt shown. ...

History of Missouri alcohol laws

1920s political boss Tom Pendergast
See also: Missouri bellwether

Nicknamed the "Show Me State" for Missourians' well-known "stalwart, conservative, noncredulous" attitude toward regulatory regimes and sumptuary laws in general,[1] Missouri has applied this tendency to its alcohol laws, both historically and today. Much of this owes itself to Missouri's position as a leading alcohol producing state, well known for wine production in areas like the Missouri Rhineland and for beer production in St. Louis by Anheuser-Busch, which produces Budweiser, a brand of beer known throughout the world. Anheuser-Busch continually lobbies to keep Missouri's alcohol laws as permissive as they are.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... Mean center of population for the United States, 1790–2000 (U.S. Census Bureau) The Missouri bellwether is a political phenomenon that notes that the state of Missouri has voted for the winner in every U.S. Presidential election since 1904 except in 1956. ... Sumptuary laws (from Latin sumptuariae leges) were laws that regulated and reinforced social hierarchies and morals through restrictions on clothing, food, and luxury expenditures. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Hermannhoff White Lady of Starkenburg wine is a German style wine made in the Missouri Rhineland. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... Budweiser, sometimes referred to as Bud, is a global pale lager brand owned by the St. ...


During the height of the temperance movement in late-19th century and early-20th century America before passage of the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act in 1919, which implemented nationwide prohibition, Missouri never implemented statewide prohibition on its own.[3] Missourians actually rejected prohibition in three separate referenda in 1910,[3] 1912, and 1918.[4] In April of 1901, when temperance crusader Carrie A. Nation came to Kansas City and began to smash liquor bottles with her hatchet in bars there, she was promptly arrested, fined $500 ($11,500 in 2006 dollars[5]), and ordered by a judge to leave Missouri and never return.[6] The Missouri General Assembly was the second to last state legislature to ratify the 18th Amendment, and was the twentieth to ratify the 21st Amendment, which repealed prohibition in 1933. A cartoon from Australia ca. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Amendment XVIII in the National Archives Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... The Volstead Act is the popular name for the National Prohibition Act (1919). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Temperance advocate Carrie Nation with her bible, and her hatchet. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. ... Amendment XXI in the National Archives Amendment XXI (the Twenty-first Amendment) to the United States Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which had mandated nationwide Prohibition. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During prohibition, Kansas City's Democratic political machine run by "Boss" Tom Pendergast saw to it that the city's liquor and saloon industries would not be affected and that the national prohibition law would not be enforced.[7] Thanks to Pendergast and his ilk, prohibition simply never existed in Kansas City, and Kansas City's federal prosecutor (who was on Pendergast's payroll) never brought a single felony prosecution under the Volstead Act.[8] This led an editorial writer in the Omaha Herald to remark, "If you want to see some sin, forget about Paris. Go to Kansas City."[8] Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... The Omaha World-Herald, founded in 1885 by Gilbert M. Hitchcock, is Omahas primary local newspaper, with circulation throughout Nebraska and south-west Iowa. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


Despite the lack of statewide prohibition, by 1934 half of Missouri's counties enacted prohibition laws on their own. In that year, however, immediately after the end of nationwide prohibition, Missouri enacted its first liquor control law, which superseded and repealed those dry counties' local laws.[9][10] Until that first liquor control act, Missouri had no statewide regulation of liquor at all. Today, Missouri has no dry jurisdictions whatsoever. Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about alcohol-free counties in the U.S. For the Bon Jovi song, see Dry County (song). ...


Missouri's original 1934 liquor control law prohibited Sunday sales of beverages with more than 5% alcohol by volume, but this restriction was lifted entirely in 1975.[11] Beyond that, Missouri never has passed any blue law. Certain older establishments in St. Louis and Kansas City are grandfathered into the ability to sell liquor both "by the drink" (individually for consumption on premises) and "by the package" (by the container for consumption off premises). Effectively, these are bars which double as liquor stores. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about laws created to enforce moral standards. ... A grandfather clause is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply to all future situations. ...


Liquor sales

What constitutes "intoxicating liquor"

Unlike many states, the alcohol laws of Missouri do not differentiate between types of alcohol based on the percentage of alcohol in a given beverage. Missouri's liquor control law[12] covers any "alcohol for beverage purposes, alcohol, spiritous, vinous, fermented, malt, or other liquors, or combination of liquors, a part of which is spiritous, vinous, or fermented, and all preparations or mixtures for beverage purposes, containing in excess of one-half of one percent by volume."[13] Thus, the liquor control law covers any type of alcoholic beverage which contains more than 0.5% alcohol by volume.


The only separate regulation is for beer containing at least 0.5% alcohol by volume and at most 3.2% alcohol by weight, which is classified as "nonintoxicating beer" (rather than a liquor) and is subject to a separate law from the liquor control law.[14][15] The nonintoxicating beer law exempts covered beverages from many of the liquor control law's regulations on sale, transportation, and consumption, including local control, as nonintoxicating beer permits and licenses are issued only by the state.[16] No nonintoxicating beer permitee or licensee may hold a liquor license, and vice-versa.[17] The same restrictions on sale to minors (and the same family furnishing exception discussed below) and hours for on-premises sale which are in the liquor control law apply to nonintoxicating beer.[18] Today, for the most part, the nonintoxicating beer law is rarely invoked, as the liquor control law's permissive sale provisions for any alcoholic beverage makes so-called "three-two beer" a rarity in Missouri. For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Low-point beer, also known as 3. ...


Any beverage containing less than 0.5% alcohol by volume (including low alcohol beer) is expressly exempt from all alcohol regulation in Missouri (including age restrictions), subject only to ordinary food safety laws.[13][15] Hoppy, a low alcohol beer Low alcohol beer (also, non-alcoholic beer, small beer, or small ale or near-beer) is beer with very low or no alcohol content. ... Food safety is a scientific discipline describing the handling, preparation, and storage of food in ways that prevent Foodborne illness. ...


Manufacturing

The packaging plant at the Anheuser-Busch headquarters in St. Louis

Missourians over the age of 21 may manufacture up to 100 gallons per person each year of any alcoholic beverage for personal use, without further limitation, without taxation, and without any license.[19] Besides that, the only alcohol which is illegal for sale or possession in Missouri is that which has been manufactured without a license and/or that on which the required taxes have not been paid.[20] This is the packaging plant building at the Anheuser-Busch brewery and headquarters in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... This is the packaging plant building at the Anheuser-Busch brewery and headquarters in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...


As a result, Missouri does not prohibit the manufacture, importation, sale, transportation, possession, or consumption of absinthe. Missouri's drug laws also contain no provision prohibiting Absinthe's essential ingredient, wormwood, or its underlying chemical substance, thujone.[21] A reservoir glass filled with a naturally-colored verte, next to an absinthe spoon. ... Binomial name L. <3Artemisia absinthium (Absinthium, Absinthe Wormwood, Wormwood or Grand Wormwood) is a species of wormwood, native to temperate regions of Europe, Asia and northern Africa. ... Thujone is a ketone and a monoterpene that exists in two stereoisomeric forms: (+)-3-thujone or α-thujone and (-)-3-thujone or β-thujone. ...


Off-premises sales

Missouri has no specific state limitations on the places where alcohol may be sold "off-premises" (i.e. for consumption elsewhere). As a result, Missouri is famous in the region for grocery stores, drug stores, and even gas stations throughout the state which sell a wide variety of beer, wine, and liquor. As long as it is not located within 100 feet of a school or church,[22] virtually any retail business (including a vague and undefined "general merchandise store") which obtains the proper licenses from the Division of Alcohol and Tobacco Control and local authorities may sell any type of alcohol.[23] State law even prohibits cities and counties from banning the off-premises sale of alcohol.[24] For a large scale grocery store, see supermarket. ... Pharmacy (from the Greek &#966;&#940;&#961;&#956;&#945;&#954;&#959;&#957; = drug) is the profession of compounding and dispensing medication. ... Modern gas station A filling station, gas station or petrol station is a facility that sells fuel for road motor vehicles &#8211; usually petrol (US: gas/gasoline), diesel fuel and LPG. The term gas station is mostly particular to the United States of America and Canada, where petrol is known...


Missouri does, however, limit the hours of retail alcohol sales to between 6:00 AM and 1:30 AM Monday through Saturday,[25] and - for an additional license fee - between 9:00 AM and midnight on Sunday.[26] Sales are allowed until closing (often 3:00 AM) in the few bars in St. Louis and Kansas City which are grandfathered into the ability to double as retail liquor stores, as mentioned above.


Most municipalities, including St. Louis[27] and Kansas City[28] have enacted local laws following the state law, which prohibit the retail sale of liquor between 1:30 AM and 6:00 AM Tuesday through Saturday, and between midnight on Sunday and 9:00 AM the following morning.


On-premises sales

Generally, the hours for sales of liquor by the drink (for consumption on the premises) are the same as liquor by the package: between 6:00 AM and 1:30 AM Monday through Saturday,[25] and - again for an additional fee - between 9:00 AM and midnight on Sunday.[26] State law allows incorporated cities to prohibit the on-premises sale of liquor by public referendum,[29] although no city in Missouri ever has held such a referendum. The on-premises sale of liquor is allowed throughout the state, without any limitation except for the hours when sale is permitted.


Since 1981, properly licensed establishments with certain (low) levels of annual revenue in Kansas City,[30] Jackson County,[30] North Kansas City,[30] St. Louis,[31] and St. Louis County[32] have been permitted to sell liquor by the drink between 6:00 AM and 3:00 AM Monday through Saturday, and between 11:00 AM and 3:00 AM on Sunday. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... North Kansas City is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... St. ...


Open container

Driving

Although a driver is prohibited from consuming alcohol while driving,[33] Missouri has no general open container law for vehicles.[34] Any non-driving vehicle passenger thus is permitted to possess an open container and consume alcohol in Missouri while the vehicle is in motion, although 31 smaller municipalities, the largest being Independence and Columbia, have local open container laws.[35] The metropolises of St. Louis and Kansas City have no local open container laws, and thus the state law (or lack thereof) governs.[35] This makes it possible for a passenger to drink legally through the entire 250-mile trip across Missouri on Interstate 70 between Downtown Kansas City and Downtown St. Louis, only closing his container while passing through the city limits of Independence, Bates City, Columbia, Foristell, and St. Charles.[35] Open container laws are US laws which prohibit possessing and/or drinking from a open container of alcohol in certain areas. ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... View from atop the Liberty Memorial; The Loop and Crossroads skyline, Crown Center isnt shown. ... Downtown St. ... Bates City is a city located in Lafayette County, Missouri. ... Foristell is a city located in St. ... St. ...


As a result of having no state open container laws, under the federal Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century of 1999, a percentage of Missouri's federal highway funds is transferred instead to alcohol education programs each year.[35][36] Since 1999, the Missouri General Assembly has considered several bills which would have created open container regimens satisfying the federal law, but each one "failed due to weak legislative support."[35] Anheuser-Busch leads opposition to enacting a passenger open container law.[2] This article is about the year. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ...


In public

Missouri also has no state public intoxication law, unlike many other states, and state law expressly prohibits local jurisdictions from enacting any law "which authorizes or requires arrest or punishment for public intoxication or being a common or habitual drunkard or alcoholic."[37] Missouri also has no state law prohibiting drinking in public, although an establishment selling liquor by the drink ordinarily may not permit a patron to take unfinished liquor off the premises.[38] Restaurant and winery patrons, though, may take unfinished bottles of wine out of the restaurant or winery, provided that the containers are closed and placed in sealed bags.[38] Public intoxication, also known as drunk and disorderly conduct (sometimes, incorrectly, as drunken disorderly), is a summary offence in many countries. ...


It is a misdemeanor in Missouri, however, to be both intoxicated and disorderly or to consume or offer any alcoholic beverage specifically in any school, church, or courthouse.[39] Consumption and offering in courthouses is permitted, though, at social functions after business hours when authorized by the court.[39]


Additionally, despite the lack of a general state law prohibiting drinking in public, nearly all municipalities, including both St. Louis[40] and Kansas City,[41] do prohibit drinking in public. St. Louis, however, does allow picknickers in public parks to consume alcohol without limitation,[42] and Kansas City allows the same as long as the picknicker obtains the necessary contract or permit from the city's liquor control board.[43]

Logo of the Power & Light District in Kansas City, where open containers of alcohol will be allowed in public

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Power & Light District is the new nine city block entertainment district on the south end of Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA. The district is located on Main Street to Grand Boulevard from west to east and on 13th Street to Interstate 670 from north to south. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...

Special allowance for open containers in public in Kansas City

In 2005, anticipating Kansas City's new Power & Light District, a nine-block shopping, bar, and restaurant entertainment district in Downtown Kansas City, and after lobbying by the Cordish Company of Baltimore (the District's developer), the Missouri General Assembly passed a new law pertaining to any "entertainment district" in Downtown Kansas City which will allow patrons to remove any alcoholic beverage from any establishment in the district and carry it openly throughout the portions of the district not open to vehicular traffic, provided that the beverage is in a plastic cup marked with the logo of the establishment at which it was purchased.[44][45][46] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Power & Light District is the new nine city block entertainment district on the south end of Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA. The district is located on Main Street to Grand Boulevard from west to east and on 13th Street to Interstate 670 from north to south. ... View from atop the Liberty Memorial; The Loop and Crossroads skyline, Crown Center isnt shown. ... The Cordish Company is a real estate development and entertainment operating company based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Baltimore redirects here. ...


Although it remains unclear how this will be interpreted or enforced once the Power & Light District opens in the fall of 2007 through the spring of 2008, for now the provision widely has been accepted as allowing drinking "in the street."[46] If so, the Power & Light District's open container allowance would be akin to that of the French Quarter in New Orleans. The City Council of Kansas City has extended this provision to include any portion not open to vehicular traffic of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, the Crossroads Arts District, the 18th and Vine Historic District, the Liberty Memorial, Crown Center, and the Union Hill neighborhood.[47] Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Once completed, the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts will be a 316,000 square-foot performing arts center. ... The Crossroads Arts District is an historic registered neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA, centered at approximately 20th Street and Main Street, between Downtowns Central Business District and Crown Center. ... The 18th and Vine District is a center of African American culture in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Liberty Memorial Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, is dedicated to the victory of liberty over oppression, in World War I against the Triple Alliance. ... Crown Center is a shopping and entertainment complex operated by the Hallmark corporation and located adjacent to the companys headquarters in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ...


DUI

Like every other state in the United States, driving under the influence is a crime in Missouri, and is subject to a great number of regulations outside of the liquor control law.[48] Missouri's maximum blood alcohol level for driving is .08% for persons over the age of 21[49] and .02% for minors.[50] For other uses, see Under the influence. ...


Ordinarily, DUI is a misdemeanor in Missouri, although the third DUI conviction becomes a felony.[51] Refusal to take a chemical test (i.e. breathalyzer) when so requested by a law enforcement officer who has probable cause will result in a one-year suspension of the suspect's driver's license.[52] A breathalyzer (or breathalyser) is a device for estimating blood alcohol content (BAC) from a breath sample. ... In United States criminal law, probable cause refers to the standard by which a police officer may make an arrest, conduct a personal or property search or obtain a warrant. ...


Minors and alcohol in Missouri

Drinking age

Missouri's drinking age has been 21 since 1945.[53] That is, Missouri law prohibits minors from possessing or purchasing alcohol. Thus, when the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 came into effect on January 1, 1985, Missouri was in no danger of losing federal highway funds. Many nations have a legal drinking age, or the minimum age one must be to drink alcohol. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... In the United States, a minor in possession, or an MIP, (also referred to as a PAULA, Posession of Alcohol Under the Legal Age) is a civil infraction, and subject to civil penalty. ... The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 (Title 23 U.S.C. §158) was passed on July 17, 1984 by the United States Congress as a mechanism whereby all states would become thereafter required to legislate and enforce the age of 21 years as a minimum age for purchasing... This article is about the year. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


A minor in possession of alcohol or a business or person which furnishes alcohol to a minor is guilty of a misdemeanor, although for sellers there are numerous defenses and exceptions.[54] Missouri is one of six states, however, with a unique exception which allows a minor to be furnished alcohol by his or her parent or guardian.[54] Of course, if a parent or guardian purposefully intoxicated his or her child, it would be a form of child abuse. Rather, this sort of law allows parents to let their children have a small amount of liquor with a meal, at social gatherings, in religious services (such as the eucharist in Christianity or kiddush in Judaism), or otherwise use alcohol in moderation. Additionally, although Missouri prohibits minors from possessing or purchasing alcohol, it is one of nineteen states (and the District of Columbia) which have no specific law prohibiting the consumption of alcohol by minors. For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Shabbat, or Shabbos (Ashkenazic pronunciation) (&#1513;&#1489;&#1514; shabb&#257;&#7791;, rest), is a day of rest that is observed once a week, from sundown on Friday until nightfall on Saturday, by practitioners of Judaism, as well as by many secular Jews. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ...


In 2005, though, the Missouri General Assembly amended the liquor control law to prohibit any minor from having a blood alcohol level higher than .02%.[54] It remains unclear how the provision permitting family consumption, the lack of a specific consumption prohibition, and the new "minor under the influence" law will work together. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


2008 movement to lower Missouri's drinking age to 18

In June of 2007, the Missouri Secretary of State approved the circulation of a ballot initiative to lower the drinking age in Missouri to 18.[55] A grassroots political action group calling itself "Missouri 18 to Drink" is trying to collect the nearly 100,000 signatures needed to get this question on the ballot for the November, 2008, general election.[56][55] For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


If the measure gets on the ballot and passes, the Missouri State Auditor estimates that it would "generate an estimated $6.91 million in state sales taxes, $1.89 million in state excise taxes, and $4.10 million in local sales taxes," but "would cost state and local governmental entities an estimated $50 million in federal transportation funds" under the National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984.[57][55] It also would make Missouri the only state in the United States with a drinking age of less than 21.[55]


Fake ID

In Missouri, it is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a $500 fine for a person under 21 to represent by virtue of displaying a fake ID that he or she is over 21 for the purposes of purchasing or possessing alcohol.[58] Additionally, it constitutes a separate misdemeanor under the liquor control law if the minor reproduced or altered the ID himself,[59] punishable by up to one year in prison[60] and/or a fine of up to $1,000.[61] Identity document forgery is the process by which identity documents issued by governing bodies are copied and/or modified by persons not authorized to create such documents or engage in such modifications, for the purpose of deceiving those who would view the documents about the identity or status of the...


The forgery of an identity document is a separate felony in Missouri,[62] punishable by up to seven years in prison[63] and/or a fine of up to $5,000 (or if financial gain was made, up to the amount of that financial gain).[64] Possession of forgery instruments also is a felony with the same prospective punishments as that of ordinary forgery.[65]


See also

This list of alcohol laws of the United States by state provides an overview of alcohol-related laws by state throughout the United States. ... Flag of the State of Kansas The alcohol laws of Kansas are among the strictest in the United States, in sharp contrast to its neighboring state of Missouri (see Alcohol laws of Missouri), but much like (though still stricter than) its other neighboring state of Oklahoma (see Alcohol laws of... Oklahoma defines low-point beer as any beverage containing between 0. ... The alcohol laws of North Carolina prohibit the sale of alcohol from 2 a. ... The History of Kansas City of Missouri and Kansas (and surrounding communities) dates back to the 1800s. ... Prior to the arrival of French explorers in 1673 the area that would become St. ... Social changes in the twentieth century influenced radically the sorts of people who live in St. ... State-wide smoking bans, both active and scheduled. ... Sumptuary laws (from Latin sumptuariae leges) were laws that regulated and reinforced social hierarchies and morals through restrictions on clothing, food, and luxury expenditures. ... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Missouri Secretary of State - State Archives - Origin of "Show Me" slogan
  2. ^ a b "Anheuser ends opposition to .08 in Missouri," Modern Brewery Age, January 22, 2001
  3. ^ a b Kenneth H. Winn, "It All Adds Up: Reform and the Erosion of Representative Government in Missouri, 1900-2000," published by the Missouri Secretary of State
  4. ^ Ira M. Wasserman, "Prohibition and Ethno-Cultural Conflict: the Missouri Prohibition Referendum of 1918," Social Science Quarterly, Volume 70, pp. 886-901.
  5. ^ The Inflation Calculator
  6. ^ "Mrs. Nation Barred from Kansas City," The New York Times, April 16, 1901
  7. ^ Allan May, "The History of the Kansas City Family," Crime Magazine, October 10, 2002
  8. ^ a b Ken Burns, "Kansas City, a Wide Open Town," from Jazz, PBS, 1997
  9. ^ 11 CSR 70-1.010(1) (Missouri Secretary of State - Code of State Regulations)
  10. ^ Annotations to Section 311.010, Revised Statutes of Missouri (R.S.Mo.)
  11. ^ Missouri Attorney General's Opinion 39-77
  12. ^ Chapter 311, R.S.Mo.
  13. ^ a b Section 311.020, R.S.Mo.
  14. ^ Chapter 312, R.S.Mo.
  15. ^ a b Section 312.020, R.S.Mo.
  16. ^ Section 312.030, R.S.Mo.
  17. ^ Section 312.050, R.S.Mo.
  18. ^ Section 312.400, R.S.Mo.
  19. ^ Section 311.055, R.S.Mo.
  20. ^ Section 311.580, R.S.Mo.
  21. ^ Chapter 195, R.S.Mo.
  22. ^ Section 311.080, R.S.Mo.
  23. ^ Section 311.200, R.S.Mo.
  24. ^ Section 311.170, R.S.Mo.
  25. ^ a b Section 311.290, R.S.Mo.
  26. ^ a b Section 311.293, R.S.Mo.
  27. ^ Sections 14.03.030-040, St. Louis City Revised Code
  28. ^ Sections 10-333 and 10-104, Kansas City Code of Ordinances
  29. ^ Section 311.110, R.S.Mo.
  30. ^ a b c Section 311.174, R.S.Mo.
  31. ^ Section 311.176, R.S.Mo.
  32. ^ Section 311.178, R.S.Mo
  33. ^ Section 577.071, R.S.Mo.
  34. ^ United States Department of Transportation - Open Container Law Conformance
  35. ^ a b c d e Justin Roberts, "Missouri State and Local Open Container Laws," University of Missouri Institute of Public Policy, June 2005
  36. ^ 23 U.S.C. Section 154
  37. ^ Section 67.305, R.S.Mo.
  38. ^ a b Section 311.101, R.S.Mo.
  39. ^ a b Section 574.075, R.S.Mo.
  40. ^ Section 14.05.010, St. Louis City Revised Code
  41. ^ Section 50-152, Kansas City Code of Ordinances
  42. ^ Section 14.05.010(a), St. Louis City Revised Code
  43. ^ Section 50-152, Kansas City Code of Ordinances
  44. ^ Section 311.086, R.S.Mo.
  45. ^ Sections 10-134 and 10-135, Kansas City Code of Ordinances
  46. ^ a b Rick Alm, "Drinking to be allowed on street in Power & Light District," The Kansas City Star, July 27, 2005
  47. ^ Section 10-134(c), Kansas City Code of Ordinances
  48. ^ Chapter 577, R.S.Mo.
  49. ^ Section 577.012, R.S.Mo.
  50. ^ Section 311.325, R.S.Mo.
  51. ^ Section 577.023, R.S.Mo.
  52. ^ Section 577.041, R.S.Mo.
  53. ^ Section 311.325, R.S.Mo.
  54. ^ a b c Section 311.310, R.S.Mo.
  55. ^ a b c d "Drink-at-18 movement makes a comeback," The Kansas City Star, September 14, 2007
  56. ^ Missouri 18 To Drink
  57. ^ Missouri Secretary of State - 2008 Initiative Petitions Approved for Circulation in Missouri
  58. ^ Section 311.320, R.S.Mo.
  59. ^ Section 311.329, R.S.Mo.
  60. ^ Section 558.011, R.S.Mo
  61. ^ Section 560.016, R.S.Mo.
  62. ^ Section 570.090, R.S.Mo.
  63. ^ Section 558.011, R.S.Mo.
  64. ^ Section 560.011, R.S.Mo.
  65. ^ Section 570.100, R.S.Mo.

 
 

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