FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Albert the Bear
Monument commemorating Albert at Spandau Citadel, Berlin.
Monument commemorating Albert at Spandau Citadel, Berlin.

Albert the Bear (German: Albrecht der Bär; c. 110018 November 1170) was the first Margrave of Brandenburg (as Albert I) from 1157 to his death and was briefly Duke of Saxony between 1138 and 1142. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Spandau Citadel is the oldest remaining structure in Berlin. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... August 5 - Henry I becomes King of England. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Historically the Margrave of Brandenburg was one of the most powerful titles in the Holy Roman Empire in being one of the 4 temporal electors and so being one of only 7 lords in the empire with a say in who became the next emperor. ... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony was in Northern Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and Westphalia. ...

Contents

Life

Albert was the only son of Otto the Rich, Count of Ballenstedt, and Eilika, daughter of Magnus Billung, Duke of Saxony. He inherited the valuable estates in northern Saxony of his father in 1123, and on his mother's death, in 1142, succeeded to one-half of the lands of the house of Billung. Albert was a loyal vassal of his relation, Lothar I, Duke of Saxony, from whom, about 1123, he received the Margraviate of Lusatia, to the east; after Lothar became King of the Germans, he accompanied him on a disastrous expedition to Bohemia in 1126, when he suffered a short imprisonment. Otto, Count of Ballenstedt, called Otto the Rich (died 9 February 1123), was the first Ascanian prince to call himself count of Anhalt, and was also briefly named duke of Saxony. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Eilika of Saxony (c. ... Magnus (died 23 August 1106) was duke of Saxony from 1072 to 1106. ... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony comprised lands in the north-westen part of present-day Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and to Westphalia. ... The Billung Family were Saxon dukes and rulers, who can be traced back to AD 500. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Seal of Lothair III. on a deed from 1131 Lothair III of Supplinburg (1075 – 1137), was Duke of Saxony (1106), King of Germany (1125), and Holy Roman Emperor from 1133 to 1137. ... Lusatia (German Lausitz, Upper Sorbian Łužica, Lower Sorbian Łužyca, Polish Łużyce, Czech Lužice) is a historical region between the Bóbr and Kwisa rivers and the Elbe river in the eastern German states of Saxony and Brandenburg, south-western Poland (Lower Silesian Voivodeship) and the northern... The following list of German monarchs is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ...


Albert's entanglements in Saxony stemmed from his desire to expand his inherited estates there. After the death of his brother-in-law, Henry II, margrave of a small area on the Elbe called the Saxon Northern March, in 1128, Albert, disappointed at not receiving this fief himself, attacked Udo, the heir, and was consequently deprived of Lusatia by Lothar. In spite of this, he went to Italy in 1132 in the train of the king, and his services there were rewarded in 1134 by the investiture of the Northern March, which was again without a ruler. The Northern March within the Empire, 10th century. ...


Once he was firmly established in the Northern March, Albert's covetous eye lay also on the thinly populated lands to the north and east. Three years he was occupied in campaigns against the Slavic Wends, who as pagans were considered fair game, and whose subjugation to Christianity was the aim of the Wendish Crusade of 1147 in which Albert took part; diplomatic measures were more successful, and by an arrangement made with the last of the Wendish princes of Brandenburg, Pribislav of the Hevelli, Albert secured this district when the prince died in 1150. Taking the title "Margrave of Brandenburg", he pressed the "crusade" against the Wends, extended the area of his mark, encouraged German migration, established bishoprics under his protection, and so became the founder of the Margraviate of Brandenburg in 1157, which his heirs — the House of Ascania — held until the line died out in 1320. Vend redirects here. ... The Northern Crusades, or Baltic Crusades, were undertaken by Western Europeans against the still heathen people of North Eastern Europe around the Baltic Sea. ... Pribislav Henry (German: ; ca. ... Lands of the Hevelli (Heveller), ca. ... Coat of arms Capital Brandenburg Berlin (from 1417) Religion Roman Catholic Lutheran Calvinist Government Monarchy Margrave  - 1157–70 Albert I  - 1797–1806 Frederick William III History  - Margraviate established 3 October, 1157  - Electorate established 25 December 1356  - Brandenburg-Prussia 27 August 1618  - Kingdom of Prussia 1 January 1701  - Dissolution of the... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

The seal of Albert the Bear.
The seal of Albert the Bear.

In 1137 Conrad III, the Hohenstaufen King of the Germans, deprived Albert's cousin and nemesis, Henry the Proud of his Saxon duchy, which was awarded to Albert if he could take it. After some initial success in his efforts to take possession, Albert was driven from Saxony, and also from his Northern march by Henry, and compelled to take refuge in south Germany. When peace was made with Henry in 1142, Albert renounced the Saxon duchyand received the Counties of Weimar and Orlamünde. It was possibly at this time that Albert was made Arch-Chamberlain of the Empire, an office which afterwards gave the Margraves of Brandenburg the rights of a prince-elector. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... King Conrad III (Cunradus rex) in a 13th-century miniature. ... Henry, known as the Proud (around 1108 – October 20, 1139), was Duke of Bavaria (Henry X, 1126-1139), Duke of Saxony (Henry II, 1138-1139), and Margrave of Tuscany (1137-1139). ... For other uses, see Weimar (disambiguation). ... Orlamünde is a town in the Saale-Holzland district, in Thuringia, Germany. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ...


In 1158 a feud with Henry's son, Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony, was interrupted by a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. In 1162 Albert accompanied Emperor Frederick Barbarossa to Italy, where he distinguished himself at the storming of Milan. Henry the Lion (statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Land (Biblical). ... Frederick Barbarossa in a 13th century chronicle. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN...


In 1164 Albert joined a league of princes formed against Henry the Lion, and peace being made in 1169, Albert divided his territories among his six sons. He died on November 13, 1170, possibly in Stendal, and was buried at Ballenstedt. is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Stendal is a town in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Cognomen

Albert's personal qualities won for him the cognomen of the Bear, "not from his looks or qualities, for he was a tall handsome man, but from the cognisance on his shield, an able man, had a quick eye as well as a strong hand, and could pick what way was straightest among crooked things, was the shining figure and the great man of the North in his day, got much in the North and kept it, got Brandenburg for one there, a conspicuous country ever since," says Carlyle, who called Albert "a restless, much-managing, wide-warring man." He is also called by later writers "the Handsome." The cognomen (name known by in English) was originally the third name of a Roman in the Roman naming convention. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... The most familiar view of Carlyle is as the bearded sage with a penetrating gaze. ...


Family and children

Foundation of the memorial to Albert at Spandau Citadel.
Foundation of the memorial to Albert at Spandau Citadel.

Albert was married in 1124 to Sofie of Winzenburg (died 25 March 1160) and they had the following children: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Spandau Citadel is the oldest remaining structure in Berlin. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ...

  1. Otto I, Margrave of Brandenburg (1126/1128–7 March 1184)
  2. Count Hermann I of Orlamünde (died 1176)
  3. Siegfried (died 24 October 1184), Bishop of Brandenburg from 1173-1180, Archbishop of Bremen from 1180-1184
  4. Heinrich (died 1185), a canon in Magdeburg
  5. Count Albrecht of Ballenstedt (died after 6 December 1172)
  6. Count Dietrich of Werben (died after 5 September 1183)
  7. Count Bernhard of Anhalt (1140–9 February 1212), Duke of Saxony from 1180-1212 as Bernard III
  8. Hedwig (d. 1203), married to Otto, Margrave of Meißen
  9. Daughter, married c. 1152 to Vladislav of Bohemia
  10. Adelheid (died 1162), a nun in Lamspringe
  11. Gertrude, married in 1155 to Duke Diepold of Moravia
  12. Sybille (died c. 1170), Abbess of Quedlinburg
  13. Eilika

Otto I (c. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Abbeville receives its commercial charter. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Abbeville receives its commercial charter. ... The Bishopric of Brandenburg was a Roman Catholic diocese established by Otto the Great in 948, including the territory between the Elbe on the west, the Oder on the east, and the Black Elster on the south, and taking in the Uckermark to the north. ... The Archbishopric of Bremen was an ecclesiastical state in the Holy Roman Empire. ... This article is about the German city. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Duke Richard of Aquitaine becomes Duke of Poitiers. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The first Great Fire of London burns most of the city to the ground Battle of Navas de Tolosa Childrens crusade Crusaders push the Muslims out of northern Spain In Japan, Kamo no Chōmei writes the Hōjōki, one of the great works of classical Japanese... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony was in Northern Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and Westphalia. ... Lamspringe is a village and a municipality in the district of Hildesheim, in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Former abbey church of St. ...

External links

Preceded by
Henry II
Duke of Saxony
11381142
Succeeded by
Henry III
Preceded by
New creation
Margrave of Brandenburg
11571170
Succeeded by
Otto I

Henry II, known as the Proud (1108 - October 20, 1139) was Duke of Saxony (1138-1139) and Duke of Bavaria (1126-1139) as Henry X. He was the son of Henry the Black Duke of Bavaria, and Wulfhild, daughter of Magnus Billung, Duke of Saxony, and thus a member of... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony comprised lands in the north-westen part of present-day Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and to Westphalia. ... Events Robert Warelwast becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Sutoku, emperor of Japan Emperor Konoe ascends to the throne of Japan Henry the Lion becomes Duke of Saxony Births Farid od-Din Mohammad ebn Ebrahim Attar, Persian mystical poet (died 1220) Hugh III, Duke of Burgundy (died 1192) Bornin1142, a GameFAQs user... Henry the Lion (statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral). ... The Margrave of Brandenburg was one of the seven Electors of the Holy Roman Empire created by the Golden Bull of 1356. ... Events Births September 8 - King Richard I of England (died 1199) Leopold V of Austria (died 1194) Hojo Masako, wife of Minamoto no Yoritomo (died 1225) Deaths August 21 - King Alfonso VII of Castile (born 1105) Agnes of Babenberg, daughter of Leopold III of Austria Sweyn III of Denmark Yury... December 29: Assassination of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Otto I (c. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Brandenburg - LoveToKnow 1911 (8150 words)
Many monasteries and towns were founded, among them Berlin; the work of Albert the Bear was continued, and the prosperity of Brandenburg formed a marked contrast to the disorder which prevailed elsewhere in Germany.
He died childless in 1319, and was succeeded by his nephew Henry II., who died in 1320, when the Ascanian family, as the descendants of Albert the Bear were called, from the Latinized form of the name of their ancestral castle of Aschersleben, became extinct.
This independence was enhanced by the fact that few great nobles had followed Albert the Bear in his work of conquest, and that consequently there were few large lordships with their crowd of dependents.
Anhalt (1669 words)
Albert was descended from Albert, count of Ballenstedt[?], whose son Esico[?] (d.
Esico's grandson, Otto the Rich[?], count of Ballenstedt, was the father of Albert the Bear, by whom Anhalt was united with the mark of Brandenburg.
When Albert died in 1170, his son Bernard, who received the title of duke of Saxony[?] in 1180, became count of Anhalt.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m