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Encyclopedia > Albert Sabin
Albert Sabin, creator of the oral polio vaccine.
Albert Sabin, creator of the oral polio vaccine.

Albert Bruce Sabin (August 26, 1906 - March 3, 1993) was a renowned American medical researcher of Jewish ancestry who is best-known for having developed the hugely successful oral vaccine for polio. Image File history File links Albert_Sabin. ... Image File history File links Albert_Sabin. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... This article is about the virus. ...


Born in 1906 in Białystok, Russia (now Poland), to Jewish parents, Jacob and Tillie Saperstein, he emigrated in 1921 to America with his family. In 1930, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States and changed his name to Sabin. Sabin received a medical degree from New York University in 1931. He trained in internal medicine, pathology and surgery at Bellevue Hospital in New York City from 1931-1933. In 1934 he conducted research at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine in England, then joined the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (now Rockefeller University). During this time he developed an intense interest in research, especially in the area of infectious diseases. In 1939 he moved to Cincinnati Children's Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. During World War II he was a lieutenant colonel in the US Army Medical Corps and helped develop vaccines against dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis. Maintaining his association with Children's Hospital, by 1946 he had also become the head of Pediatric Research at the University of Cincinnati. Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Podlachian Powiat city county Gmina BiaÅ‚ystok Established 14th century City Rights 1692 Government  - Mayor Tadeusz Truskolaski Area  - City 102 km²  (39. ... Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Bellevue Hospital is a famous hospital located in New York City, New York, United States. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... In medicine, infectious disease or communicable disease is disease caused by a biological agent (e. ... Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center is a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ... The Army Medical Department (AMEDD) of the U.S. Army comprises the six medical Special Branches of the Army. ... “Dengue Fever” redirects here. ... Red areas show the distribution of Japanese Enecphalitis in Asia 1970-1998 Japanese Encephalitis (日本脳炎 Nihon-nōen) is a disease caused by the mosquito borne Japanese Encephalitis Virus. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


With the menace of polio growing, he and other researchers, most notably Jonas Salk in Pittsburgh and Hilary Koprowski in New York and Philadelphia, sought a vaccine to prevent or to ameliorate this illness. Salk's so-called "killed" vaccine was tested and released for use in 1955 . It was effective in preventing most of the complications of polio, but did not prevent the initial, intestinal, infection from occurring. Sabin's "live" virus vaccine began international testing through the World Health Organization in 1957 when large groups of children in Russia, Holland, Mexico, Chile, Sweden and Japan received it. The United States Public Health Service endorsed his "live" virus vaccine for polio in 1961 . His product, prepared with cultures of attenuated polio viruses, could be taken orally, and prevented the actual contraction of the disease. It was this biologic which effectively eliminated polio from the United States. Jonas Edward Salk (October 28, 1914 – June 23, 1995) was an American physician and researcher best known for the development of the first successful polio vaccine (the eponymous Salk vaccine). ... Hilary Koprowski, Warsaw (Poland), September 16, 2007 Hilary Koprowski Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Hilary Koprowski Hilary Koprowski (b. ... WHO redirects here. ... Template:Higher standard // History of the United States Public Health Service The United States Public Health Service (PHS) was founded first by President John Adams in 1798 as a loose network of hospitals to support the health of American seamen. ...


See also

  • Duke Energy Center, formerly named the Albert B. Sabin Cincinnati Convention Center

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External links

  • Dr. Albert Sabin's Discovery of the Oral Polio Vaccine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
  • Obituary, NY Times, March 4, 1993
  • Sabin Vaccine Institute
Persondata
NAME Sabin, Albert
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Physician and epidemiologist
DATE OF BIRTH August 26, 1906
PLACE OF BIRTH Białystok, Russia
DATE OF DEATH March 3, 1993
PLACE OF DEATH Washington, D.C., USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
AllRefer.com - Albert Sabin Information (372 words)
Sabin was convinced that a live form would be longer-lasting and more effective, and in 1957 he succeeded in weakening the virus so that it lost its virulence.
Sabin was unable to test his new vaccine in America because, at an earlier stage of the Salk vaccine's development in 1954, a faulty batch caused paralytic polio in some children.
However, Sabin managed to interest the Russians in his vaccine, and subsequently was able to report in 1959 that 4.5 million vaccinations had been successfully carried out.
Albert Sabin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (303 words)
Albert Bruce Sabin (August 26, 1906 - March 3, 1993) is a renowned American medical researcher who is best-known for having developed the hugely successful oral vaccine for Polio.
Sabin studied medicine at New York University and developed an intense interest in research, especially in the area of infectious diseases.
Sabin's breakthrough occurred some five years later, when the United States Public Health Service endorsed his "live" virus vaccine for polio in 1961.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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