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Encyclopedia > Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg

Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg
Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

Latin: Alma Mater Alberto-Ludoviciana

Motto Die Wahrheit wird euch frei machen ("The truth will make you free")
Established 1457
Type Public university
Rector Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Jäger
Students 22,100
Location Freiburg, Germany
Affiliations EUA
LERU
Website www.uni-freiburg.de
Location of Freiburg in Germany.
Location of Freiburg in Germany.

Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg (German Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg ) was founded 1457 in Freiburg by the Habsburgs. One of the oldest universities in Germany, it has a long tradition of teaching the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. The university is one of Germany's most prestigious and a leading research as well as teaching institution in Europe. Logo of the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, taken from University website. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Events University of Freiburg founded. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Map_Freiburg_in_Germany. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Events University of Freiburg founded. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...

Kollegiengebäude I, erected in 1913 as main building of the university.
Kollegiengebäude I, erected in 1913 as main building of the university.

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1428x1071, 590 KB) de Beschreibung: Kollegiengebäude I der Universität, 1913 als Universitäts-Hauptgebäude errichtet. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1428x1071, 590 KB) de Beschreibung: Kollegiengebäude I der Universität, 1913 als Universitäts-Hauptgebäude errichtet. ...

History

Originally Albrechts University, the university started with four faculties (theology, philosophy, medicine and law). Its establishment belongs to the second wave of German university foundings in the late Middle Ages, like the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen and the University of Basel. Established by papal privilege (papal bull) the University in Freiburg actually was - like all or most universities in the Middle Ages - a corporation of the church body and therefore belonged to the Roman Catholic Church and its hierarchy. The bishop of Basel consequently was its provost or chancellor (Kanzler), the bishop of Konstanz was its patron while the real founder of the university was the sovereign, Archduke Albert VI of Austria, being the brother of Frederick III, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. At its founding, the university was named after Albert VI of Austria. He provided the university with land and a huge amount of endowments as well as its own jurisdiction. Also he declared Albrechts University as the "county university" (German Landesuniversität) for his territory - in the past including an area from Alsace to Tyrol - until it was handed over to the Austrian House of Habsburg in 1490. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A view of the campus Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (German: Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, sometimes called the Eberhardina) is a public university located in the city of Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... The University of Basel (German: Universität Basel) is located at Basel, Switzerland. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For other uses, see Basel (disambiguation). ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ... Konstanz in 1925 seen from the lake Schnetztor, a section of the former city wall Another gate from city wall Shops in Konstanz The Konzilgebäude in Konstanz Konstanz (in English formerly known as Constance) is a university town of around 80,000 inhabitants at the western end of Lake... Generally, patronage is the act of supporting or favoring some person, group, or institution. ... Albert VI (born December 12, 1418 in Vienna, died December 2, 1463 in Vienna) was a Habsburg Archduke and son of Ernest the Iron. ... Emperor Frederick III Frederick III of Habsburg (Innsbruck, September 21, 1415 – August 19, 1493 in Linz) was elected as German King as the successor of Albert II in 1440. ... The Holy Roman Empire should not be mistaken for the Roman Empire (31 B.C.–A.D. 476). ... Albert VI (born December 12, 1418 in Vienna, died December 2, 1463 in Vienna) was a Habsburg Archduke and son of Ernest the Iron. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... (New region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² (??? mi) km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol Austria-Hungary in 1914, showing Tirol–Vorarlberg as the left-most province, coloured cream Capital Meran (Merano), until 1848 Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - Created County 1140  - Bequeathed to Habsburgs 1363 or 1369  - Joined Council of Princes 1582  - Trent, Tyrol and... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ...


Shortly after that the university had a time of prosperity when numerous later famous humanists were educated there like Geiler von Kaysersberg, Johann Reuchlin or Jakob Wimpfeling. When Ulric Zasius was teaching law (until 1536), Freiburg became a centre of humanist jurisprudence. From 1529 to 1535 Erasmus of Rotterdam lived and taught in Freiburg. Since around 1559 the university was housed at the Altes Collegium ("Old College"), today called the "new town-hall". The importance of the university decreased during the time of the Counter-Reformation. To counter those tendencies, the administration of two faculties was handed over to the Roman-Catholic order of the Jesuits in 1620. (The two faculties were, of course, Theology (or Divinity) and Philosophy.) Since 1682 the Jesuits built up their college as well as the Jesuit church (nowadays the "University Church" or Universitätskirche). Humanism is a system of thought that defines a socio-political doctrine (-ism) whose bounds exceed those of locally developed cultures, to include all of humanity and all issues common to human beings. ... Johann Reuchlin (January 29, 1455 - 1522) was a German humanist and Hebrew scholar. ... Jakob Wimpfeling (July 25, 1450–November 17, 1528) was a German Renaissance humanist and theologian. ... Ulrich Zasius (1461-1536) was a famous jurist, born at Constance in 1461. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... This article deals with the Erasmus, the theologian. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... The Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation was a strong reaffirmation of the doctrine and structure of the Catholic Church, climaxing at the Council of Trent, partly in reaction to the growth of Protestantism. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Divinity is the academic study of Christian and other theology and religious ministry at a school, divinity school, university, or seminary. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ...


At times, especially during the disorders of the Thirty Years' War, the university had to move out of Freiburg temporarily, e.g. from 1686 to 1698, when French troops devastated Freiburg and the southern parts of the upper Rhine region. Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway (Until 1643) Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire ( Catholic League) Spain Austria Bavaria Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I of... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... The Upper Rhine (German: ) is the part of the Rhine that flows northbound after Basel, along the Rhine rift, and then westward to Bingen. ...


After Freiburg as the capital of Further Austria was re-conquered, a new time began for the university by the reforms of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. The requirements for admission were changed for all faculties in 1767 (before that time only Roman Catholics were allowed to study) and Natural Sciences were added as well as Public Administration. Also in 1767, the university became a governmental institution despite the Church's protests. The Church finally lost its predominant influence on the university when the Jesuits were suppressed following a decree signed by Pope Clement XIII in 1773. It also might have been the Zeitgeist and the official line of the new Emperor Joseph II (successor and son of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria) that his Patent of Tolerance which ensured Protestants the same rights as Catholics (published 1781) finally began an era of Enlightenment within the domains of the Habsburg, nowadays known as an era called "Josephinismus". Consequently Johann Georg Jacobi (brother of the more famous philosopher Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi) in 1784 was the first Protestant professor teaching at the university in Freiburg. It is said that Joseph II instructed in his will to offer the professorship in Freiburg to Johann Heinrich Jacobi, probably already guessing the shocked reaction which the citizens of Freiburg would show given the fact that the area around Freiburg was deeply devoted to Catholicism. This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Further Austria (in German: Vorderösterreich or die Vorlande) was the collective name for the old possessions of the Habsburgs in south-western Germany (Swabia), the Alsace, and in Vorarlberg after the focus of the Habsburgs had moved to Austria. ... Not to be confused with Maria Theresa of Austria (1816-1867). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ... به خاطر اعمال تخریبی یک کاربر مشخص AOLØŒ ویکی‌پدیا معمولاً proxyهای AOL را می‌بندد. متأسفانه ممکن است تعداد زیادی از کاربران AOL از یک خادم proxy واحد استفاده کنند، Ùˆ در نتیجه کاربران بی‌تقصیر AOL معمولاً ندانسته بسته می‌شوند. از دردسر ایجاد شده عذر می‌خواهیم. اگر این اتفاق برای شما افتاد، لطفاً به یکی از مدیران از یک نشانی پست الکترونیک AOL پیغام بفرستید. حتماً نشانی IPÛŒ را در فوق داده شده ذکر کنید. بازگشت به صفحهٔ اصلی. گرفته شده از «http://fa. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Clement XIII, born Carlo della Torre Rezzonico (Venice, March 7, 1693 – Rome, February 2, 1769), was Pope from 1758 to 1769. ... Joseph II may refer to either: Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II, Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Not to be confused with Maria Theresa of Austria (1816-1867). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Enlightenment (or brightening) broadly means the acquisition of new wisdom or understanding enabling clarity of perception. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Johann Georg Jacobi (September 2, 1740 - 1814), German poet, elder brother of the philosopher, Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi , was born at Düsseldorf. ... Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi (January 25, 1743 - March 10, 1819), was a German philosopher who made his mark on philosophy by coining the term nihilism and promoting it as the prime fault of Enlightenment thought and Kantianism. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Joseph II may refer to either: Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II, Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


When Freiburg became a part of the newly established Grand Duchy of Baden (in German "Großherzogtum Baden") in 1805 (after Napoleon occupied the area of the formerly Further Austria), a crisis began for the university in Freiburg. Indeed there were considerations by Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden and Karl, Grand Duke of Baden to close down the university in Freiburg while both of them thought that the Grand Duchy could not afford to run two universities at the same time (the Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg also already existed since 1386). The university had enough endowments and earnings to survive until the beginning of the regency of Ludwig I, Grand Duke of Baden in 1818. Finally in 1820 he saved the university with an annual contribution. Since then the university has been named Albert Ludwigs University Freiburg (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg) as an acknowledgement of gratitude by the university and the citizens of Freiburg. This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... A grand duchy is a territory whose head of state is a Grand Duke or Grand Duchess. ... Baden is a historical state in the southwest of Germany, on the right bank of the Rhine. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Further Austria (in German: Vorderösterreich or die Vorlande) was the collective name for the old possessions of the Habsburgs in south-western Germany (Swabia), the Alsace, and in Vorarlberg after the focus of the Habsburgs had moved to Austria. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden (November 22, 1728 in Karlsruhe--June 10, 1811 in Karlsruhe) was the son of Margrave Friedrich of Baden and Anna of Nassau-Dietz-Orange (October 13, 1710--September 17, 1777), the daughter of William Friso of Nassau-Dietz-Orange. ... ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... A grand duchy is a territory whose head of state is a Grand Duke or Grand Duchess. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (also known as simply University of Heidelberg) is the oldest German university. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ...


In the 1880s the population of the student body and faculty started to grow quickly. The excellent scientific reputation of Albert Ludwigs University attracted several researchers like economist Adolph Wagner, historians Georg von Below and Friedrich Meinecke, or jurists Karl von Amira and Paul Lenel. In 1899 Freiburg became the first German university to accept a female student. Just before World War I the university counted 3,000 students. After World War I the highly distinguished philosophers Edmund Husserl and (since 1928) Martin Heidegger taught at Albert Ludwigs University, as well as Edith Stein (she was the assistant of Edmund Husserl, the predecessor of Martin Heidegger). On the field of social sciences, Walter Eucken developed the idea of ordoliberalism, which consequently is also known as the "Freiburg School". // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Adolph Wagner (25 March 1835 - 1917) was a German economist and social reformer, a leading Kathedersozialist and public finance scholar; Wagners Law of increasing state activity is named after him. ... Fridrich Meinecke (October 30, 1862-February 6, 1954) was a liberal German historian. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859, Prostějov – April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the father of phenomenology. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Edith Stein (October 12, 1891 – August 9, 1942) was a German philosopher, a Carmelite nun, martyr, and saint of the Catholic Church, who died at Auschwitz. ... Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859, Prostějov – April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the father of phenomenology. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Walter Eucken (* 17 January 1891 Jena, Germany; † 20 March 1950 London, UK) was a German economist and father of ordoliberalism. ... This article is about political philosophy of Ordoliberalism. ... The Freiburg School is a school of economic thought founded in the early years of Nazi Germany at the University of Freiburg. ...


In the beginning of the 20th century several new university buildings were built in the centre of Freiburg, such as in 1911 the new main building. During the "Third Reich" the university went through the process of Gleichschaltung like the rest of the German universities. This means that most of the non-governmental or non-state-controlled institutions, unions, clubs and associations of students were illegal (e.g. Catholic student fraternities were declared illegal). Under the rector Martin Heidegger all Jewish faculty members, among them many excellent and renowned Jewish scientists and professors, were forced to leave the university in accordance with the "‘Law for the Reintroduction of Professional Civil Service". After World War II the university was re-opened. New buildings for natural sciences were erected in the Institutsviertel ("institute quarter"). (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... The German word Gleichschaltung â’½ â’¾ (literally synchronising, synchronization) is used in a political sense to describe the process by which the Nazi regime successively established a system of totalitarian control over the individual, and tight coordination over all aspects of society and commerce. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ...


In the late 20th century, the university was part of a mass education campaign and expanded rapidly. The student body grew to 10,000 by the 1960s, and doubled to 20,000 students by 1980. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the 1970s, the faculty structure was changed to 14 departments, with the Faculty of Applied Sciences becoming the 15th faculty in 1994. In 2002, the number of faculties was reduced to eleven. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For the song by 311, see Grassroots Applied science is the exact science of applying knowledge from one or more natural scientific fields to practical problems. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


In 2003, the university opened a memorial dedicated to the victims of National Socialism among the students, staff, and faculty.


The Albert Ludwigs University Freiburg has many partnerships with universities all around the world, especially the "Sokrates/Erasmus" partnership - a system mainly throughout Europe with an exchange-programme that is very popular with foreign students.


Since March, 2006 the Albert Ludwigs University (ALU) Freiburg is a member of the League of European Research Universities (LERU). According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ...


As of October, 2007 the University of Freiburg is one of nine "elite universities" in Germany.


Campus

Kollegiengebäude I as viewed from the library.

Having grown with the city since the 15th century, the university's buildings are deeply intertwined with the city of Freiburg. There are three large campuses scattered throughout the city (the university centre next to the historical city of Freiburg, the institutes quarter and the applied sciences campus), but other buildings can be found all over Freiburg. Picture of Freiburg University, made by Till Westermayer User:Tillwe File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Picture of Freiburg University, made by Till Westermayer User:Tillwe File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The University Medical Center Freiburg (Universitätsklinikum Freiburg) is one of Germany's largest medical centers. It boasts nearly 1,800 beds and handles 54,000 in-patients a year, with another 300,000 being treated ambulatorily. It consists of 13 specialized clinics, 5 clinical institutes, and 5 centers (e.g. Center for Transplantation Medicine). Many of the University Medical Center's achievements are ground-breaking, such as the first implantation of an artificial heart (2002) and so help to make the university clinic one of Germany's most distinguished. The University Medical Center Freiburg (Universitätsklinikum Freiburg) is one of the largest medical centers in Germany, as well as one of the most reputable. ...


Students

Prospective students

Today the university has a student population of around 22,100, including both undergraduate and graduate students. Approximately 16% of these students are foreigners.


The university features a student-run radio station (echo-fm [1]) and a student television program, alma* [2], which is also available as a podcast.


Faculty

Today, there are about 430 professors, 3,695 scientific employees and 8,644 non-scientific employees working for the Albert Ludwigs University, making it Freiburg's and the region's biggest employer. The university's reputation attracts world-class professors and researchers to Freiburg, leading to an excellent position in the 2005 Humboldt Ranking[3], which measures the number of research stays by foreign fellows and award winners sponsored by the Humboldt Foundation. Freiburg achieved a particularly high rank in the life sciences, finishing second. The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (in German Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung) is a foundation of the German government for the promotion of international cooperation in the field of scientific research. ...


Current affairs and Academics

In university rankings of German magazines and periodicals (Der Spiegel, Zeit, Focus, etc. [4], [5]) the Albert Ludwigs University has established itself as one of Germany's top universities. The faculties for law, medicine, history, English studies, biology, and pharmacology achieve especially high scores. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The European Commission compiled a list of the 22 European universities with the highest scientific impact [6] (measured in terms of the impact factor of their scientific output), taking several years of specialist effort to evaluate. The ranking focuses on the scientific quality of an institution, as opposed to its size or perceived prestige. The University of Freiburg ranked 6th highest in Europe and 2nd highest in Germany.


The genetically engineered golden rice was developed by the University of Freiburg and the ETH Zurich from 1992 to 2000. It was considered a breakthrough in biotechnology at the time of the publication and now helps to provide people with vitamin A in areas with a dietary lack thereof. White rice and golden rice Golden rice is a variety of rice (Oryza sativa) produced through genetic engineering to biosynthesize the precursors of beta-carotene (pro-vitamin A) in the edible parts of rice. ... The ETH Zurich, often called Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, is a science and technology university in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. ...


The Alberto-Ludoviciana further demonstrated its position as one of the best German universities during the Excellence Initiative by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (Germany), which intends to improve German university funding and create a group of internationally visible excellence universities. The University of Freiburg received funding for the new graduate school Spemann Graduate School of Biology and Medicine, the excellence cluster Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, and was selected for funding at the highest level of the Excellence Initiative, making Freiburg one of nine elite universities in Germany. The university will be able to realize its concept for the future, called "Windows for Research", which aims to promote a high level of interdisciplinarity between the research fields and attract scientists from all over the world. The University of Freiburg intends to found a Freiburg Institute of Advanced Studies (FRIAS) with four main schools: School of Historical Studies, School of Language and Literature, School of Life Sciences, and School of Soft Matter Science and Functional Systems. Members of this institute will be top researchers of international renown to be invited as fellows. The Federal Ministry for Education and Research (German: Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF) is a ministry in the German cabinet; it is headquartered in Bonn, but also has an office in Berlin. ...


After having selected three "elite universities" in the first round in 2006, the Excellence Initiative jury announced on October 19, 2007 that they had chosen a further six elite universities in the second round which will receive funding for their future concepts. This increases the number of future concepts funded to a total of nine. As one of the institutions selected, the University of Freiburg can now refer to itself as an excellence university and look forward to over EUR 130 million in extra funds over the next five years. ([7], [8]) Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


In 2007, the Albert Ludwigs University celebrates its 550th anniversary. Speakers at the festivities included: President of the European Commission, José Manuel Barroso, Federal Minister of Education and Research, Annette Schavan, and Minister-President of the State of Baden-Württemberg, Günther Oettinger. François-Xavier Ortoli, Romano Prodi, José Manuel Barroso and Jacques Delors The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union bureaucracy. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, ) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician. ... The Federal Ministry for Education and Research (German: Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF) is a ministry in the German cabinet; it is headquartered in Bonn, but also has an office in Berlin. ... Annette Schavan (born June 10, 1955 in Jüchen) is a German politician (CDU). ... A minister-president (Ministerpräsident) is the head of government of a German federal state; the office corresponds to the governorship of a state in the United States. ... Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE1 Capital Stuttgart Minister-President Günther Oettinger (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  35,752 km² (13,804 sq mi) Population 10,741,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density... Günther Oettinger (born October 15, 1953 in Stuttgart) is a German politician from the Christian Democratic Union (CDU). ...


The moot court team of the Faculty of Law won the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot, a prestigious international moot court competition, for the second time in 2007. Vis Moot The Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot[1] is a prestigious annual international moot court competition held in Vienna, Austria. ...


The university's humanoid robot team (NimbRo) [9] of the Faculty for Applied Sciences regularly competes very successfully in international tournaments. Team NimbRo are the currently reigning world champions in the TeenSize and KidSize categories of the humanoid league.


Organization

Students eating in the central mensa (cafeteria) on Rempartstraße.
"Die Wahrheit wird euch frei machen" (The truth will make you free).
"Die Wahrheit wird euch frei machen" (The truth will make you free).

The university is headed by a rector and divided into 11 faculties: Studentings eating in the central mensa, photograph made by Till Westermayer User:Tillwe File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1388 KB) de Beschreibung: Epitaph an der Universität Freiburg Quelle: eigene Aufnahme Fotograf: AlterVista Datum: Juli 2004 Hinweis: Zuerst hochgeladen von AlterVista am 8. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1388 KB) de Beschreibung: Epitaph an der Universität Freiburg Quelle: eigene Aufnahme Fotograf: AlterVista Datum: Juli 2004 Hinweis: Zuerst hochgeladen von AlterVista am 8. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ...

  1. Faculty of Theology
  2. Faculty of Law
  3. Faculty of Medicine
  4. Faculty of Economics and Behavioural Sciences
  5. Faculty of Philology
  6. Faculty of Philosophy (history, sociology, etc.)
  7. Faculty of Mathematics and Physics
  8. Faculty of Chemistry, Pharmacy and Geo-sciences
  9. Faculty of Biology
  10. Faculty of Forestry and Environmental science
  11. Faculty of Applied Science (MEMS, computer science)

The University is part of the regional EUCOR federation with Karlsruhe, Basel, Mulhouse and Strasbourg, the League of European Research Universities, the European University Association, ASEA-Uninet, AC21, and the International Forum of Public Universities (IFPU). Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The University Medical Center Freiburg (Universitätsklinikum Freiburg) is one of the largest medical centers in Germany, as well as one of the most reputable. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Philology, etymologically, is the love of words. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth Sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... For the song by 311, see Grassroots Applied science is the exact science of applying knowledge from one or more natural scientific fields to practical problems. ... A mite next to a gear set produced using MEMS. Courtesy Sandia National Laboratories, SUMMiTTM Technologies, www. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Karlsruhe (population 285,812 in 2006) is a city in the south west of Germany, in the Bundesland Baden-Württemberg, located near the French-German border. ... The University of Basel (German: Universität Basel) is located at Basel, Switzerland. ... Mulhouse (French: Mulhouse, pronounced ; Alsatian: Milhüsa; German: Mülhausen) is a town and commune in eastern France close to Swiss and German border. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ...


There are numerous scientific institutions located in Freiburg, which also cooperate with the university, adding on to the formidable scientific repertoire of Freiburg.


They include, among others:

The Leibniz-Gemeinschaft (complete title: Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz . ... The Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology is a research institute of the Max Planck Society located in Freiburg. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... The Max Planck Society (MPG) started in 2000 an initiative to attract more international students to Germany to pursue their PhD studies. ... The Fraunhofer Society (German: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft) is a German research organization with 58 institutes spread throughout Germany, each focusing on different fields of applied science (as opposed to the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, which works primarily on basic science). ... The Fraunhofer Society (German: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft) is a German research organization with 58 institutes spread throughout Germany, each focusing on different fields of applied science (as opposed to the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, which works primarily on basic science). ... The Fraunhofer Society (German: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft) is a German research organization with 58 institutes spread throughout Germany, each focusing on different fields of applied science (as opposed to the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, which works primarily on basic science). ... The Fraunhofer Society (German: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft) is a German research organization with 58 institutes spread throughout Germany, each focusing on different fields of applied science (as opposed to the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, which works primarily on basic science). ... The Fraunhofer Society (German: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft) is a German research organization with 58 institutes spread throughout Germany, each focusing on different fields of applied science (as opposed to the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, which works primarily on basic science). ...

Notable alumni and professors

Humanities & Social Sciences

Politics & Law Günther Anders (Günther Stern) (WrocÅ‚aw, July 12th, 1902 - Vienna, December 17th, 1992) was a German philosopher. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... Götz Briefs (b. ... Rudolf Carnap (May 18, 1891, Ronsdorf, Germany – September 14, 1970, Santa Monica, California) was an influential philosopher who was active in central Europe before 1935 and in the United States thereafter. ... Davor Dzalto (Davor Džalto, Давор Џалто) is an artist, art historian and theoretician, born in Travnik (Bosnia and Herzegovina) on May 17th 1980. ... Alfred Döblin (August 10, 1878 – June 26, 1957) was a German expressionist novelist, best known for Berlin Alexanderplatz. ... Desiderius Erasmus in 1523 Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... Hans Friedrich Karl Günther (born February 16, 1891 in Freiburg; died September 25, 1968 also in Freiburg) was a German race researcher and eugenicist in the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich. ... Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859, ProstÄ›jov – April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the father of phenomenology. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Emmanuel Lévinas (IPA: , January 12, 1906 Kaunas, Lithuania - December 25, 1995 Paris) was a French philosopher and Talmudic commentator. ... Karl Löwith (9 January 1897 in Munich – 26 May 1973 in Heidelberg) was a German-Jewish philosopher, a student of Heidegger. ... Niklas Luhmann (December 8, 1927 - November 6, 1998) was a German sociologist, administration expert, and social systems theorist, as well as one the most prominent modern day thinkers in the sociological systems theory. ... Karl Mannheim (March 27, 1893, Budapest - January 9, 1947, London) was a Jewish Hungarian-born sociologist, influential in the first half of the 20th century and one of the founding fathers of classical sociology. ... Herbert Marcuse (July 19, 1898 – July 29, 1979) was a German-born philosopher, sociologist and a member of the Frankfurt School. ... Fridrich Meinecke (October 30, 1862-February 6, 1954) was a liberal German historian. ... Wilfred Harold Munro (August 20, 1849–August 9, 1934) was an American historian, brother of Dana C. Munro. ... Heinrich John Rickert ( 25 May 1863 - 25 July 1936) was a German philosopher of the Baden School. ... Gerhard Albert Ritter (April 6, 1888-July 1, 1967) was a well-known German conservative historian. ... James Harvey Robinson (1863–1936) was an American historian. ... Franz Rosenzweig (December 25, 1886 – December 10, 1929) was an influential Jewish theologian and philosopher. ... Humphrey Spender was born in 1910 and is a photographer, painter, architect, designer and mural painter. ... Edith Stein (October 12, 1891 – August 9, 1942) was a German philosopher, a Carmelite nun, martyr, and saint of the Catholic Church, who died at Auschwitz. ... Leo Strauss (September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973), was a German-born political philosopher who specialized in the study of classical political philosophy. ... Gerd Tellenbach (1903–1999) was a German historian and scholar of medieval social and religious history, particularly of the Papacy and German church during the Investiture Controversy and reform movements of the eleventh and twelfth centuries. ... Martin Waldseemüller (19th century painting). ... For the politician, see Max Weber (politician). ...

Economics For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ... Richard V. Allen was the United States National Security Advisor to President Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1982. ... Hildegard Behrens (1941 - ) is a German soprano known for her wide repertory including Wagner, Weber, Mozart and Richard Strauss roles. ... Karl Binding Karl Ludwig Lorenz Binding was born on April 6, 1841 as the third child of Georg Christoph Binding and Dorothea Binding in Frankfurt(Main), Germany. ... Jürgen Chrobog (1995) Jürgen Chrobog (born February 28, 1940) is a German jurist and diplomat. ... Konstantin Fehrenbach (January 11, 1852–March 26, 1926) was a German Catholic politician who was one of the major leaders of the Catholic Center Party. ... Dr. Hans Karl Filbinger (born September 15, 1913 in Mannheim died April 1, 2007) was a conservative German politician (CDU). ... Paul Joseph Goebbels (German pronunciation: IPA: ) (October 29, 1897 – May 1, 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ... Julius Leber (born 16 November 1891 in Biesheim, Alsace), died 5 January 1945 in Berlin) was a German politician and resistance fighter against the Nazi régime. ... Jutta Limbach Jutta Limbach (born March 27, 1934 in Berlin) is a German jurist and politician. ... Panagiotis Pipinelis (Παναγιώτης Πιπινέλης) was a Greek politician and diplomat. ... Wolfgang Schäuble Wolfgang Schäuble (born September 18, 1942 in Freiburg im Breisgau as the son of a tax finance advisor) is a German politician. ... Peter Schlechtriem (born March 2, 1933 in Jena; died April 23, 2007 in Freiburg im Breisgau) was a German jurisprudential scholar. ... Ulrich Zasius (1461 - November 24, 1536) was a German jurist. ...

Theology Walter Eucken (* 17 January 1891 Jena, Germany; † 20 March 1950 London, UK) was a German economist and father of ordoliberalism. ... Friedrich Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek (May 8, 1899 – March 23, 1992) was an economist and social scientist of the Austrian School, noted for his defense of free-market capitalism against a rising tide of socialist thought in the mid-20th century. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adolph Wagner (25 March 1835 - 1917) was a German economist and social reformer, a leading Kathedersozialist and public finance scholar; Wagners Law of increasing state activity is named after him. ...

Medicine & Sciences Johann Eck (November 13, 1486 – February 13, 1543) was a 16th century theologian and defender of Catholicism during the Protestant Reformation. ... Sculpture of Frings in Cologne. ... Karl Cardinal Lehmann (born May 16, 1936 in Sigmaringen) is a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, Bishop of Mainz and chairman of the Congregation of the German Bishops (German: Deutsche Bischofskonferenz). ... Gregor Reisch (born at Balingen in Wurtemberg, about 1467; died at Freiburg, Baden, 9 May 1525) was a German Carthusian humanist writer. ... Franz Anton Staudenmaier (September 11, 1800 - January 19, 1856) was a Catholic theologian. ...

  • Hermann Staudinger , professor (Nobel Prize 1953, Chemistry)
  • Otto Heinrich Warburg , student (Nobel Prize 1931, Physiology or Medicine; Nobel Prize 1944 in Physiology or Medicine offered, was forced to decline due to political reasons)
  • August Weismann
  • Heinrich Otto Wieland , professor (Nobel Prize 1927, Chemistry)
  • Adolf Windaus , student (Nobel Prize 1928, Chemistry)
  • Georg Wittig , professor (Nobel Prize 1979, Chemistry)
  • Ernst Zermelo

Karl Albert Ludwig Aschoff (January 10 in Berlin, Germany, 1866 – June 24, 1942 in Freiburg, Germany) was a German physician and pathologist. ... Robert Bárány Robert Bárány (April 22, 1876 – April 8, 1936) was an Austrian physician of Hungarian-Jewish descent. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Erwin Baur (1875 - 1933) was a German geneticist and botanist. ... Theodor Bilharz (March 23, 1825 – May 9, 1862) was a German physician and an important pioneer in the field of parasitology. ... Vincenz Czerny (Trutnov, 19 November 1842 - Heidelberg, 3 October 1916) was a German surgeon whose main contributions were in the fields of oncological and gynecological surgery. ... Eugen Fischer, circa 1938. ... Otfrid Foerster Otfrid Foerster (b. ... Paul Ehrlich Paul Ehrlich in his workroom Paul Ehrlich (March 14, 1854 – August 20, 1915) was a German scientist who won the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Felix Hausdorff Felix Hausdorff (November 8, 1868 – January 26, 1942) was a German mathematician who is considered to be one of the founders of modern topology and who contributed significantly to set theory and functional analysis. ... Philip Showalter Hench (February 28, 1896 – March 30, 1965) was an American physician who, with E. C. Kendall, in 1948 successfully applied an adrenal hormone (later known as cortisone) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Karl Herxheimer (June 26, 1861 - December 6, 1942) was a German dermatologist who was a native of Wiesbaden. ... George Charles de Hevesy (born as Hevesy György, also known as Georg Karl von Hevesy) (August 1, 1885 in Budapest – July 5, 1966) was a Hungarian chemist who was important in the development of the tracer method where radioactive tracers are used to study chemical processes, e. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alfred Erich Hoche (August 1, 1865 - May 16, 1943) was a German psychiatrist well-known for his writings about eugenics. ... Karen Horney Karen Horney (horn-eye), born Danielsen (September 16, 1885 – December 4, 1952) was a German Freudian psychoanalyst of Norwegian and Dutch descent. ... Johannes Hans Daniel Jensen (June 25, 1907 – February 11, 1973) was a German physicist who shared half of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physics with Maria Goeppert-Mayer for their proposal of the shell nuclear model. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Georges Jean Franz Köhler (Munich, March 17, 1946 – March 1, 1995 in Freiburg im Breisgau) was a German biologist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sir Hans Adolf Krebs (August 25, 1900 – November 22, 1981) was a German, later British medical doctor and biochemist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adolph Kussmaul (1822 - 1902) was a German physician. ... Paul Langerhans (1847 - 1888) was a famous German pathologist and biologist. ... Kurt Zadek Lewin (September 9, 1890 – February 12, 1947) was a German psychologist and one of the pioneers of social psychology. ... Carl Louis Ferdinand von Lindemann (April 12, 1852 - March 6, 1939) was a German mathematician, noted for his proof, published in 1882, that π is a transcendental number, i. ... Ernst Willi Messerschmid (born May 21, 1945) is a German physicist and veteran astronaut. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mario J. Molina (born March 19, 1943) was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in elucidating the threat to the Earths ozone layer of chlorofluorocarbon gases (or CFCs). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Karl Wilhelm von Nägeli (March 27, 1817 - May 11, 1891) was a Swiss botanist. ... Julius von Sachs Julius von Sachs (October 2, 1832 - May 29, 1897), German botanist, was born in Breslau, Silesia. ... Bert Sakmann (born June 12, 1942) is a German cell physiologist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Christoph Scheiner (July 25, 1573 or 1575 – June 18, 1650) was a German astronomer and Jesuit. ... Hans Spemann (June 27, 1869 - September 12, 1941) was a German embryologist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1935 for his discovery of the effect now known as embryonic induction, the influence exercised by various parts of the embryo that directs the development of groups... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links LERU_logo. ... Hermann Staudinger (March 23, 1881 in Worms- Sept. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Otto Heinrich Warburg (October 8, 1883, Freiburg im Breisgau – August 1, 1970, Berlin), son of Emil Warburg, was a German physiologist and medical doctor. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... August Weismann Friedrich Leopold August Weismann (b. ... Heinrich Otto Wieland (June 4, 1877 – August 5, 1957) was a German chemist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adolf Otto Reinhold Windaus (1876 - 1959) was a significant German chemist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Georg Wittig (June 16, 1897 in Berlin (Germany) - August 26, 1987) was a german chemist who reported a method for synthesis of alkenes from aldehydes and ketones using compounds called phosphonium ylides. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ernst Friedrich Ferdinand Zermelo (July 27, 1871, Berlin, German Empire – May 21, 1953, Freiburg im Breisgau, West Germany) was a German mathematician, whose work has major implications for the foundations of mathematics and hence on philosophy. ...

See also

The University Medical Center Freiburg (Universitätsklinikum Freiburg) is one of the largest medical centers in Germany, as well as one of the most reputable. ... This article is about Freiburg in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ...

External links

References

1. http://www.echo-fm.uni-freiburg.de/
2. http://www.uni-tv.uni-freiburg.de/
3. http://www.humboldt-foundation.de/en/aktuelles/presse/pn_archiv_2006/2006_11.htm
4. CHE research ranking (http://www.che.de/cms/?getObject=260&getName=Projekte+alphabetisch&strAction=show&PK_Projekt=172&getLang=)
5. FOCUS-Uniranking 2007 (in German)
6. Downsizing and specialising: the university model for the 21st century? (Ranking of top 22 European Universities with highest scientific impact, part of the "Third European Report on Science & Technology Indicators" 2003, updated 2004) ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/indicators/docs/3rd_report_snaps10.pdf
7. University of Freiburg press release (10.19.2007)
8. University of Freiburg, Excellence Initiative site
9. http://www.nimbro.net/


 
 

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