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Encyclopedia > Albert Gallatin
Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin
Albert Gallatin

In office
May 14, 1801 – February 8, 1814
Preceded by Samuel Dexter
Succeeded by George W. Campbell

Born January 29, 1761
Geneva, Switzerland
Died August 12, 1849
Astoria, New York, USA
Political party Democratic-Republican
Spouse Hannah Gallatin
Profession Politician, Teacher

Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, linguist, politician, diplomat, Congressman, and the longest-serving United States Secretary of the Treasury. He was also a founder of New York University. Albert Gallatin (1848 photograph) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Samuel Dexter (May 14, 1761–May 4, 1816) was an early American statesman who served both in Congress and in the Presidential Cabinet. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Astoria, New York is a neighborhood in the northwestern part of Queens, New York. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the republican party in 1793, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until it broke up in the 1820s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A teachers room in a Japanese middle school, 2005. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Ethnologyis a genre of cultural anthropology and| anthropological study, involving the systematic comparison of the beliefs and practices of different societies. ... The following is a list of linguists, those who study linguistics. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...


Born in Switzerland, Gallatin immigrated to America in the 1780s, ultimately settling in Pennsylvania. He was politically active against the Federalist Party program, and was elected to the United States Senate in 1793, but was removed from office by a 14-12 party-line vote after a protest raised by his opponents suggested he had fewer than the required nine years of citizenship. In 1795 he was elected to the House of Representatives and served in the fourth through sixth Congresses, becoming House Majority Leader. He was an important leader of the new Democratic-Republican Party, and its chief spokesman on financial matters and opposed the entire program of Alexander Hamilton. He also helped found the House Committee on Finance (later the Ways and Means Committee) and often engineered withholding of finances by the House as a method of overriding executive actions to which he objected. Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist party. ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...

Contents

Early life

Gallatin was born in Geneva, Switzerland, to a wealthy family, emigrating to Massachusetts in 1780. For a brief period, he attempted to set himself up in business, and for an even briefer time taught French at Harvard University, finally purchasing land in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh and moving there in 1784. (His land was in Virginia when he bought it, but became part of Pennsylvania soon afterward.) The Friendship Hill National Historic Site, his home overlooking the Monongahela River, is maintained by the National Park Service. Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Location in the state of Pennsylvania Formed September 26, 1783 Seat Uniontown Area  - Total  - Water 2,067 km² (798 mi²) 20 km² (8 mi²) 0. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. Commonwealth. ... Friendship Hill National Historic Site, maintained by the National Park Service, was the home of early American politician Albert Gallatin. ... The Monongahela River at Morgantown, West Virginia in 1999 The Monongahela River (Affectionately referred to as The Mon) is a river on the Allegheny Plateau in West Virginia and Pennsylvania in the United States. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


Political career

Daguerreotype of Albert Gallatin, original probably by Anthony, Edwards & Co.
Daguerreotype of Albert Gallatin, original probably by Anthony, Edwards & Co.

Almost immediately, Gallatin became active in Pennsylvania politics; he was a member of the state constitutional convention in 1789, and was elected to the state legislature in 1790. Image File history File links Albert_gallatin. ... Image File history File links Albert_gallatin. ... L’Atelier de lartiste. ... The current Constitution of Pennsylvania, most recently revised in 1968, forms the law for the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Capitol Building The Pennsylvania General Assembly is the U.S. state of Pennsylvanias legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Harrisburg. ...


Senator

In 1793, Gallatin won election to the United States Senate. When the Third Congress opened on December 2, 1793, he took the oath of office, but, on that same day, nineteen Pennsylvania Federalists filed a protest with the Senate that Gallatin did not have the minimum nine years of citizenship required to be a senator. The petition was sent to committee, which duly reported that Gallatin had not been a citizen for the required period. Gallatin rebutted the committee report, noting his unbroken residence of thirteen years in the United States, his 1785 oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth of Virginia, his service in the Pennsylvania legislature, and his substantial property holdings in the United States. The report and Gallatin's rebuttal were sent to a second committee. This committee also reported that Gallatin should be removed. The matter then went before the full Senate where the Gallatin was removed in a party-line vote of 14–12. Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with President of the United States oath of office. ...


Gallatin's brief stint in the Senate was not without consequence. Gallatin had proven to be an effective opponent of Alexander Hamilton's financial policies, and the election controversy added to his fame. The dispute itself had important ramifications. At the time, the Senate held closed sessions. However, with the American Revolution only a decade ended, the senators were leery of anything which might hint that they intended to establish an aristocracy, so they opened up their chamber for the first time for the debate over whether to unseat Gallatin. Soon thereafter, open sessions became standard procedure for the Senate. Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist party. ...

References
  • Butler, Anne M.; Wolff, Wendy (1995). “Case 1: Albert Gallatin”, Senate Election, Explusion and Censure Cases from 1793 to 1990. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 3–5.

Party leader

Entering the House of Representatives in 1795, he served in the fourth through sixth Congresses, and went on to become majority leader. He was an important leader of the new Democratic-Republican Party, and its chief spokesman on financial matters. He opposed the entire program of Alexander Hamilton, though when he came to power he found himself keeping all the main parts. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist party. ...


As party leader, Gallatin put a great deal of pressure on Treasury Secretary Oliver Wolcott Jr. to maintain fiscal responsibility. He also helped found the House Committee on Finance (which would evolve into the Ways and Means Committee) and often engineered withholding of finances by the House as a method of overriding executive actions to which he objected. Among these was the Quasi-War, of which he was a vociferous foe. His measures to withhold naval appropriations during this period were met with vehement animosity by the Federalists, who accused him of being a French spy. It was the opinion of Thomas Jefferson that the Alien and Sedition Acts were passed largely as a way to rein in Gallatin. Oliver Wolcott Jr. ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ... The term federalist refers to a pooponent of one of several different ideologies, depending on the locale or subject matter. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... The Alien and Sedition Acts were a series of laws passed by the Federalists in 1798 during the administration of President John Adams. ...


Secretary of the Treasury

Gallatin is honored with a statue in front of the United States Treasury Building in Washington, D.C.
Gallatin is honored with a statue in front of the United States Treasury Building in Washington, D.C.

When Jefferson became President, Gallatin was appointed Secretary of the Treasury. Gallatin served in that post for thirteen years, the longest term in history for that office. During the first part of his tenure, he made great progress in balancing the federal budget. The United States was able to make the Louisiana Purchase without a tax increase in large part due to Gallatin's efforts. Gallatin also involved himself in the planning of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, mapping out the area to be explored. Image File history File links GallatinTreas. ... Image File history File links GallatinTreas. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department and the treasury of the United States government. ... From Frank Bond, Louisiana and the Louisiana Purchase. ... Lewis and Clark The Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804–1806) was the first started to look like connor hall, he loved sailing while eating donuts. ...


In 1812, the United States was financially unprepared for war. For example, the Democratic Republicans allowed the First Bank of the United States to expire in 1811, over Gallatin's objections. He had to ship $7 million to Europe to pay off its foreign stockholders just at a time money was needed for war. The heavy military expenditures for the War of 1812, and the decline in tariff revenue caused by the embargo and the British blockade, sent the budget into the red. In 1813, the Treasury had expenditures of $39 million and revenue of only $15 million. Despite anger from Congress, Gallatin was forced to reintroduce the Federalist taxes he had denounced in 1798, such as the taxes on whiskey and salt, as well as a direct tax on land and slaves. He succeeded in funding the deficit of $69 million by bond issues, and thereby paid the direct cost of the war, which amounted to $87 million. He later helped charter the Second Bank of the United States in 1816. The First Bank of the United States was proposed by Alexander Hamilton to relieve the war debt from the United States Revolutionary War, develop a national currency, and dispose of the western territories. ... Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson Sir Isaac Brock† George Prevost Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates... The Embargo Act of 1807 was a United States law prohibiting all export of cargo from US ports. ... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ... An excise is an indirect tax or duty levied on items within a country. ... The Second Bank of the United States was a bank chartered in 1816, five years after the expiration of the First Bank of the United States. ...


Diplomat

In 1813, President James Madison sent him as the United States representative to a Russian-brokered peace talk, which Britain ultimately refused, preferring direct negotiations. Gallatin then resigned as Secretary of the Treasury to head the United States delegation for these negotiations in France and was instrumental in the securing of the Treaty of Ghent, which brought the War of 1812 to a close. James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817). ... Signing of the Treaty of Ghent The Treaty of Ghent, signed on December 24, 1814, in Ghent, Flanders (Belgium), United Kingdom of the Netherlands, ended the War of 1812 between the United States and United Kingdom. ...


At war's end, Gallatin, preferring to remain in France, was appointed United States Minister to that country and held that post for another seven years. He returned to America in 1823 and was nominated for Vice President by the Democratic-Republican Congressional caucus that had chosen William H. Crawford as its Presidential candidate,[1] although he later withdrew from the race.[2] Gallatin was alarmed at the possibility Andrew Jackson might win; he saw Jackson as “an honest man and the idol of the worshippers of military glory, but from incapacity, military habits, and habitual disregard of laws and constitutional provisions, altogether unfit for the office.” [Adams 599] The system of diplomatic rank has over time been formalised on an international basis. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the republican party in 1793, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until it broke up in the 1820s. ... The Congressional nominating caucus is the name for informal meetings in which American congressmen would agree on who to nominate for the Presidency and Vice Presidency from their political party. ... Portrait of U.S. politician William H. Crawford William Harris Crawford (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician during the early 19th century. ... This article is 45 kilobytes or more in size. ...


He returned home to Pennsylvania where he lived until 1826.


By 1826, there was much contention between the United States and Britain over claims to the Columbia River system on the Northwest coast. Gallatin put forward a claim in favor of American ownership, outlining what has been called the “principle of contiguity” in his statement called “The Land West of the Rockies”. It states that lands adjacent to already settled territory can reasonably be claimed by the settled territory. This argument is an early version of the doctrine of America's “manifest destiny”. This principle became the legal premise by which the United States was able to claim the lands to the west. Columbia River Gorge, Washington or North side The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river situated in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest of the United States. ... This painting (circa 1872) by John Gast called American Progress is an allegorical representation of Manifest Destiny. ...


In 1826 and 1827, he served as minister to the Court of St. James (i.e., minister to Great Britain). The Court of St Jamess is the popular name of the royal court of the United Kingdom. ...


Later life

He then settled in New York City, where he helped found New York University in 1831, in order to offer university education to the lower and middle classes. He became president of the National Bank (which was later renamed Gallatin Bank). In 1849, Gallatin died in Astoria in what is now the Borough of Queens, New York; he is interred at Trinity Churchyard in New York City. Prior to his death, Gallatin had been the last surviving member of the Jefferson Cabinet. New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... Astoria, New York is a neighborhood in the northwestern part of Queens, New York. ... Queens Borough in New York City, in yellow This article is about the New York City borough. ... Trinity Church Cemetery consists of three separate burial grounds associated with Trinity Church in Manhattan, New York, USA. The first was established in the Churchyard located at 74 Trinity Place at Wall Street and Broadway. ...


Native American studies

Throughout his public service career, Gallatin pursued an interest in Native American language and culture. He drew upon government contacts in his research, gathering information through one-time Secretary of War Lewis Cass, explorer William Clark, and Thomas McKenney of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Gallatin developed a personal relationship with Iroquois tribal leader John Ridge, who provided him with information on the vocabulary and structure of the Cherokee language. Gallatin's research resulted in two published works: A Table of Indian Languages of the United States (1826) and Synopsis of the Indian Tribes of North America (1836). His research led him to conclude that the natives of North and South America were linguistically and culturally related, and that their common ancestors had migrated from Asia in prehistoric times. An Aani (Atsina) named Assiniboin Boy. ... Campaign poster for 12th United States Presidential campaign, 1848. ... William Clark William Clark (August 1, 1770 - September 1, 1838) was a Scottish-American explorer who accompanied Meriwether Lewis on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States within the Department of the Interior charged with the administration and management of 55. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (Haudenosaunee, also known as the League of Peace and Power, Five Nations, or Six Nations) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... John Ridge (1892 - June 1829, Indian Name: Yellow Bird) was the son of Major Ridge and a member of the Cherokee Tribe. ...


In 1842, Gallatin joined with John Russell Bartlett to found the American Ethnological Society. Later research efforts include examination of selected Pueblo societies, the Akimel O'odham (Pima) peoples, and the Maricopa of the Southwest. In politics, Gallatin stood for assimilation of Native Americans into European based American society, encouraging federal efforts in education leading to assimilation and denying annuities for Native Americans displaced by western expansion. John Russell Bartlett (1805-1886), American historical and linguistic student, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, on the 23rd of October 1805. ... Pueblos are traditional communities of aboriginal Americans in the southwestern United States of America. ... The Akimel Oodham or Pima are a group of Native Americans living in an area consisting of what is now central and southern Arizona (USA) and Sonora (Mexico). ... For the county in Arizona, see Maricopa County, Arizona The Maricopa, or Pipaash, are a Native American ethnic group that consisted of small groups of people situated on the banks of the Colorado River that came together in the 19th century. ... Assimilation, from Latin assimilatio meaning to render similar, is used to describe various phenomena: schema (psychology), the process of assimilating new ideas into a schema (cognitive structure). ...


Honors

United States Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are banknotes characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... Gallatin County is a county located in the state of Montana. ... ... Gallatin is a city in Sumner County, Tennessee, United States. ... The Gallatin River The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km long), in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department and the treasury of the United States government. ... The Gallatin School of Individualized Study (generally known simply as Gallatin) is a small college within New York University. ...

See also

The American Ethnological Society is the oldest professional anthropological association in the United States. ...

Notes

  1. ^ [1881] (1899) “Caucus”, Lalor, John J. (ed.): Cyclopaedia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States by the Best American and European Writers. New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co. Retrieved on 2006-08-09.
  2. ^ Gallatin, Albert; Adams, Henry (1879). The Writings of Albert Gallatin. J.B. Lippincott & Co., 297–299. Retrieved on 2006-08-09.

2006 (MMVI), a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... Henry Adams Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 – March 27, 1918) was an American historian, journalist and novelist. ... 2006 (MMVI), a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ...

Sources

Primary sources

  • (1879) Adams, Henry (ed.): The Writings of Albert Gallatin, 3 volumes.
  • Gallatin, Albert (1976). “The Land West of the Rockies”, The Annals of America, 11 volumes, Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc, 209–214.
  • Gallatin, Albert (1848). Peace with Mexico, hosted by the Portal to Texas History.

Henry Adams Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 – March 27, 1918) was an American historian, journalist and novelist. ...

Secondary sources

Books

  • Adams, Henry (1879). Life of Albert Gallatin.
  • Nettels, Curtis P. (1962). The Emergence of a National Economy, 1775–1815.
  • Walters, Raymond (1957). Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat. ISBN 0-8229-5210-6.

Web

Preceded by
William Maclay
United States Senator (Class 1) from Pennsylvania
December 2, 1793February 28, 1794
(election declared void)
Served alongside: Robert Morris
Succeeded by
James Ross
Preceded by
William Findley
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district

1795–1801
Succeeded by
John Smilie
Preceded by
Samuel Dexter
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1801–1814
Succeeded by
George W. Campbell
Preceded by
William Harris Crawford
United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to France
1815–1823
Succeeded by
James Brown
Preceded by
Rufus King
United States Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain
1826–1827
Succeeded by
James Barbour
New York University v  d  e 

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The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... George W. Campbell George Washington Campbell (February 9, 1769–February 17, 1848) was an American statesman. ... Portrait of U.S. politician William H. Crawford This is about the 19th century Georgia politician; for the 18th century U.S. military officer, see Colonel William Crawford. ... List of United States ambassadors to France : United States Envoys to France Benjamin Franklin, Arthur Lee, Silas Deane (substitued by John Adams in 1778) 1776-1779 United States Ministers Plenipotentiary to France Benjamin Franklin September 14, 1778 - May 17, 1785 Thomas Jefferson March 10, 1785 - September 26, 1789 William Short... James Brown (11 September 1766 – 7 April 1835) was a United States Senator from Louisiana for the years 1813-1817 and 1819-1823. ... 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John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788–May 18, 1855) was an American politician who was Secretary of War from 1841 to 1843 and Secretary of the Treasury from 1843 to 1844 under President John Tyler. ... George Mortimer Bibb (October 30, 1776–April 14, 1859) was an American politician. ... Robert John Walker (July 23, 1801–November 11, 1869) was an American economist and statesman. ... William Morris Meredith (June 8, 1799–August 17, 1873) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Thomas Corwin Thomas Corwin (also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy) (July 29, 1794 - December 18, 1865) was a member of the United States House of Representatives (elected as a Whig to the 22nd Congress and to the four succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1831, until... James Guthrie (December 5, 1792 – March 3, 1869) was an American businessman and politician. ... Howell Cobb (September 7, 1815–October 9, 1868) was an American political figure. ... Philip F. Thomas For the actor, see Philip Michael Thomas. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798–April 21, 1879) was an American politician. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Hon. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... William Adams Richardson (November 2, 1821–October 19, 1896) was an American judge and politician. ... Benjamin Helm Bristow (June 20, 1832–June 22, 1896) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the first Solicitor General of the United States and as a U.S. Treasury Secretary. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813–January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles James Folger (April 16, 1818–September 4, American politician, jurist and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... Daniel Manning (May 16, 1831–December 24, 1887) was an American businessman and politician. ... Charles Stebbins Fairchild (April 30, 1842–November 24, American businessman and politician. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles Foster Charles Foster (April 12, 1828–January 9, 1904) was a U.S. Republican politician from Ohio. ... John G. Carlisle (September 5, 1834 - July 31, 1910) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party during the last quarter of the 19th century. ... Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836–January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer. ... Leslie Mortimer Shaw (November 2, 1848–March 28, 1932) was an American businessman, lawyer and politician. ... G.B. Cortelyou Brian William Cortelyou (July 26, 1862–October 23, 1940) was an American Presidential Cabinet secretary of the early 20th century. ... Franklin MacVeagh (November 22, 1837–July 6, 1934) was an American banker and Treasury Secretary. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... David Franklin Houston (February 17, 1866–September 2, 1940) was an American academic, businessman and politician. ... Mellon at his Desk, 1929. ... Ogden Livingston Mills (August 23, 1884–October 11, 1937) was an American businessman and politician. ... Woodin, 1933, Time Woodins signature, as used on American currency William Hartman Woodin (1868–1934) was a U.S. industrialist. ... Henry Morgenthau Jr. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890 – September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... Portrait of John W. Snyder U.S. Secretary of the Treasury painted by Greta Kempton. ... Humphreys signature, as used on American currency George Magoffin Humphrey (March 8, 1890–January 20, 1970) was an American lawyer, businessman and Cabinet secretary. ... Robert Bernard Anderson Andersons signature, as used on American currency Robert Bernard Anderson (June 4, 1910–August 14, 1989) was a U.S. administrator and businessman. ... Dillons signature, as used on American currency Clarence Douglas Dillon (August 21, 1909 – January 10, 2003) son of Clarence and Ann (Douglass) Dillon, was U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to France (1953-1957) and 57th secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury (1961-1965). ... Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Joseph Walker Barr (January 17, 1918–February 23, 1996) was an American businessman and politician. ... For the American historian, see David M. Kennedy (historian). ... John Connally, Governor of Texas, Secretary of the Treasury Connallys signature, as used on American currency John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... Blumenthal, on the cover of Time magazine Blumenthals signature, as used on American currency Werner Michael Blumenthal, Ph. ... Chairman Miller, Time, 1978 Millers signature, as used on American currency George William Miller (March 9, 1925 – March 17, 2006) served as the 65th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Carter from August 6, 1979 to January 20, 1981. ... Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate production. ... James Addison Baker III (born 28 April 1930 in Houston, Texas) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H... Nicholas F. Brady Nicholas Frederick Brady (born April 11, 1930, in New York City) was United States Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and is also known for articulating the Brady Plan in March 1989. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Robert Edward Rubin (b. ... Lawrence Henry (Larry) Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury for part of President George W. Bushs first Administration. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...

Erich Maria Remarque InstituteFurman Center for Real Estate and Urban PolicyGNATMount Sinai School of MedicineNew York Institute for the Humanities The Erich Maria Remarque Institute is an institute under the auspices of New York University that focuses on contemporary Europe. ... The Furman Center is a joint center at New York University School of Law and the NYU Wagner School of Public Service. ... For German Naval Acoustic Torpedo see G7es torpedo, for the light jet aircraft see Folland Gnat and for the UAV see GNAT-750. ... The Mount Sinai School of Medicine is a premier medical school located in Manhattan in New York City. ... The New York Institute for the Humanities (NYIH) is an academic organisation affiliated with New York University, founded by Richard Sennett in 1976 to promote the exchange of ideas between academics, professionals and the general public. ...

Athletics New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...

Coles Sports and Recreation CenterDeans' CupEast River ParkEastern Intercollegiate Volleyball AssociationFencingRiverbank State ParkUniversity Athletics AssociationVan Cortlandt ParkViolet D. Bobcat Students play a game of basketball in NYUs intramural sports program. ... The Deans Cup is an annual charity basketball game between the law schools of Columbia University and New York University (NYU). ... East River Park, part of the New York City Parks Department, is a public park located on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. ... The Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA) is a college athletic conference whose member schools compete in mens volleyball. ... // Organization Three women collegiate fencers, Julia Jones and Dorothy Hafner of New York University and Elizabeth Ross of Cornell University, founded the NIWFA in 1929. ... Riverbank State Park is located in Manhattan, New York in the USA. The park is within New York City and is the only state park in Manhattan. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... Van Cortlandt Park is a large urban park in the Bronx, NY. It has an area of 1,146 acres (4. ... Violet D. Bobcat is a mascot used by New York University. ...

Campus New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...

Bobst Library • La Maison Française • Residence HallsPuck BuildingRusk Institute of Rehabilitation MedicineSilver CenterTamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Archives • Torch Club • Union SquareVilla LaPietraWashington Square Park Built between 1967 and 1972, the Elmer Holmes Bobst Library serves the New York University community. ... Washington Square La Maison Française is the center for French culture at New York University. ... 200 Water Street Hayden Hall, 33 Washington Square West Dormitories at New York University are unique in that many are converted apartment complexes or old hotels. ... Gilded figure of Puck The Puck Building occupies the block bounded by Lafayette, Houston, Mulberry and Jersey Streets in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, USA. This example of Romanesque Revival architecture, designed by Albert and Herman Wagner, was constructed in 1885 and expanded in 1893. ... Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. ... The Silver Center of Arts and Science was built to replace New York Universitys original Main Building. ... The Tamiment Library is a research library at New York University that documents radical and Left history, with strengths in the histories of communism, socialism, anarchism, the New Left, the Civil Rights Movement, and utopian experiments. ... Union Square Union Square (also known as Union Square Park) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century. ... New York University: Villa LaPietra Villa Lapietra Villa LaPietra is the 57-acre estate of New York Unviersity in Florence, Italy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Washington Square North. ...

People

President John SextonAlbert Gallatin John Sexton (born 1942) is the fifteenth President of New York University, having held this position since 2002. ...

Schools New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...

Undergraduate Colleges and Schools
College of Arts and ScienceCollege of DentistryCourant InstituteEhrenkranz School of Social WorkGallatin School of Individualized StudySteinhardt School of EducationStern School of BusinessTisch School of the Arts The College of Arts and Science of New York University (CAS) is the oldest school at NYU, founded in 1831. ... The New York University College of Dentistry is one of 14 schools and divisions at New York University // History (NYUCD) was founded in 1865 as the New York College of Dentistry. ... The Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences (CIMS) is a division of New York University (NYU) and serves as a center for research and advanced training in computer science and mathematics. ... The Ehrenkranz School of Social Work is a division within New York University. ... The Gallatin School of Individualized Study (generally known simply as Gallatin) is a small college within New York University. ... The Steinhardt School of Education is one of 14 divisions within New York University. ... The Leonard N. Stern School of Business is New York Universitys (NYU) business school. ... Tisch School of the Arts (known more commonly as Tisch or TSOA) is one of the 14 schools that make up New York University (NYU). ...


Graduate/Professional Colleges and Schools
College of Arts and ScienceContinuing and Professional StudiesInstitute of Fine ArtsSchool of LawSchool of MedicineWagner Graduate School of Public Service The NYU Graduate School of Arts and Science is one of 14 divisions within New York University and was founded in 1886 by Henry Mitchell MacCracken, establishing NYU as the second academic institution in the United States to grant Ph. ... The School of Continuing and Professional Studies is a unit of New York University. ... The Institute of fine Arts is one of the 14 divisions of New York University (NYU). ... Vanderbilt Hall The New York University School of Law (NYU Law) is the law school of New York University. ... The New York University School of Medicine was founded in 1841, ten years after the New York Universitys founding, as the University Medical College. ... The Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service (often truncated to NYU Wagner or simply Wagner) is public policy school and one of 14 schools and divisions at New York University and the largest school of public service in the United States. ...

Student Life New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ...

Eucleian SocietyPhilomathean SocietyWashington Square NewsWNYU The Eucleian Society is a Student Society based at New York University that began in 1832. ... The Philmathean Society at New York University is a student society based at but not officially connected to New York University. ... The Washington Square News is the daily student newspaper of New York University. ... WNYU is a non-commercial radio station owned and operated by New York University. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Albert Gallatin - LoveToKnow 1911 (2668 words)
ALBERT GALLATIN (1761-1849), American statesman, was born in Geneva (Switzerland) on the 29th of January 1761.
Gallatin worked at his new task with his usual industry, tact and patience, but the results were meagre, although an open breach on the delicate question of the north-east boundary of the United States was avoided by referring it to the arbitration of the king of the Netherlands.
Gallatin had always been a consistent opponent of slavery; he felt keenly, therefore, the attempts of the South to extend the slave power and confirm its existence, and the remnant of his strength was devoted in his last days to writing and distributing two able pamphlets against the war with Mexico.
Albert Gallatin - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (1998 words)
Gallatin was born in Geneva, Switzerland to a wealthy family, emigrating to Massachusetts in 1780.
Almost immediately, Gallatin became active in Pennsylvania politics; he was a member of the state constitutional convention in 1789, and was elected to the state legislature in 1790.
Gallatin then resigned as Secretary of the Treasury to head the United States delegation for these negotiations in France and was instrumental in the securing of the Treaty of Ghent, which brought the War of 1812 to a close.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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