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Encyclopedia > Albert Abraham Michelson
Albert Abraham Michelson
Albert Abraham Michelson
Albert Abraham Michelson
Born December 29, 1852
Strzelno, Poland
Died May 9, 1931
Pasadena, California
Residence USA
Nationality Jewish-Polish
Field Physicist
Institution Case Western Reserve University
Clark University
University of Chicago
Alma mater US Naval Academy
University of Berlin
Academic advisor Hermann Helmholtz
Notable students Robert Millikan
Known for Speed of light
Michelson-Morley experiment
Notable prizes Nobel Prize for Physics (1907)
His signature.
His signature.

Albert Abraham Michelson (surname pronunciation anglicised as "Michael-son") (December 19, 1852May 9, 1931) was a Polish-born German-American physicist known for his work on the measurement of the speed of light and especially for the Michelson-Morley experiment. In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics, the first American to receive the Nobel in the sciences. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 405 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1479 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The photo is well over 70 years old. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Strzelno, formerly German Strelno. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland_(bordered). ... From the Middle Ages until the Holocaust, Jews were a significant part of the Polish population. ... ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... Clark University, in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the United States, is a private teaching and research institution founded in 1887 by the industrialist Jonas Clark. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... There is no institution called the University of Berlin, but there are four universities in Berlin, Germany: Humboldt University of Berlin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) Technical University of Berlin (Technische Universität Berlin) Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin) Berlin University of the Arts (Universität der... Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (August 31, 1821 – September 8, 1894) was a German physician and physicist. ... Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868 – December 19, 1953) was an American experimental physicist who won the 1923 Nobel Prize for his measurement of the charge on the electron and for his work on the photoelectric effect. ... Image File history File links Nobel. ... A line showing the speed of light on a scale model of Earth and the Moon The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. ... The Michelson-Morley experiment, one of the most important and famous experiments in the history of physics, was performed in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and is considered by some to be the first strong evidence against the theory of... Image File history File links Nobel. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 177 pixel Image in higher resolution (942 × 209 pixel, file size: 109 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Signature of Albert Abraham Michelson. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 177 pixel Image in higher resolution (942 × 209 pixel, file size: 109 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Signature of Albert Abraham Michelson. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... ... A line showing the speed of light on a scale model of Earth and the Moon The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. ... The Michelson-Morley experiment, one of the most important and famous experiments in the history of physics, was performed in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and is considered by some to be the first strong evidence against the theory of... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ...

Contents

Life

Michelson, the son of a Jewish merchant, was born in, what is today Strzelno, Poland (then Strelno, Provinz Posen in the Prussian-occupied region of partitioned Poland). He moved to the United States with his parents in 1855, when he was two years old. He grew up in the rough mining towns of Murphy's Camp, California and Virginia City, Nevada, where his father was a merchant. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Strzelno, formerly German Strelno. ... The Province of Posen (German: Provinz Posen, Polish: Prowincja Poznańska) was a province of Prussia (1846-1918). ... Flag of Prussia (1894 - 1918) The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... The Partitions of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (Polish: Rozbiór Polski or Rozbiory Polski; Lithuanian: Lietuvos-Lenkijos padalijimai, Belarusian: Падзелы Рэчы Паспалітай) took place in the 18th century and ended the existence of the sovereign Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Murphys is a census-designated place located in Calaveras County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... View of Virginia City, Nevada, from a nearby hillside, 1867-68 Virginia City is a city located in Storey County, Nevada. ...


President Ulysses S. Grant awarded Michelson a special appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy in 1869. During his four years as a midshipman at the Academy, Michelson excelled in optics, heat and climatology as well as drawing. After his graduation in 1873 and two years at sea, he returned to the Academy in 1875 to become an instructor in physics and chemistry until 1879. From 1880 to 1882, Michelson undertook postgraduate study at Berlin under Hermann Helmholtz and at Paris. Ulysses S. Grant[2] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... Table of Opticks, 1728 Cyclopaedia Optics ( appearance or look in ancient Greek) is a branch of physics that describes the behavior and properties of light and the interaction of light with matter. ... In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is defined as transfer of thermal energy [1] Generally, heat is a form of energy transfer associated with the different motions of atoms, molecules and other particles that comprise matter when it is hot and when it is cold. ... Climatology is the study of climate, scientifically defined as weather conditions averaged over a period of time,[1] and is a branch of the atmospheric sciences. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe and their precise formulation in a mathematical framework. ... Chemistry - the study of atoms, made of nuclei (center particles) and electrons (outer particles), and the structures they form. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Berlin is the capital city and one of the sixteen states of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (August 31, 1821 – September 8, 1894) was a German physician and physicist. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...

First page of Michelson's Experimental Determination of the Velocity of Light, written during his time in the U.S. Navy.

Michelson was fascinated with the sciences and the problem of measuring the speed of light in particular. While at Annapolis, he conducted his first experiments of the speed of light, as part of a class demonstration in 1877. After two years of studies in Europe, he resigned from the Navy in 1881. In 1883 he accepted a position as professor of physics at the Case School of Applied Science in Cleveland, Ohio and concentrated on developing an improved interferometer. In 1887 he and Edward Morley carried out the famous Michelson-Morley experiment which seemed to rule out the existence of the aether. He later moved on to use astronomical interferometers in the measurement of stellar diameters and in measuring the separations of binary stars. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 411 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1755 × 2560 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 411 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1755 × 2560 pixel, file size: 1. ... A line showing the speed of light on a scale model of Earth and the Moon The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. ... City nickname: Americas Sailing Capital Location in the state of Maryland Founded 1649 Mayor Ellen O. Moyer (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 19. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, with some residence halls on the south end of campus located in Cleveland Heights. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Interferometry is the applied science of combining two or more input points of a particular data type, such as optical measurements, to form a greater picture based on the combination of the two sources. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Edward Morley (1887). ... The Michelson-Morley experiment, one of the most important and famous experiments in the history of physics, was performed in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and is considered by some to be the first strong evidence against the theory of... Look up aether, ether in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Diagram showing a possible layout for an astronomical interferometer, with the mirrors laid out in a parabolic arrangement (similar to the shape of a conventional telescope mirror). ...


In 1889 Michelson became a professor at Clark University at Worcester, Massachusetts and in 1892 was appointed professor and the first head of the department of physics at the newly organized University of Chicago. Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Clark University, in Worcester, Massachusetts, in the United States, is a private teaching and research institution founded in 1887 by the industrialist Jonas Clark. ...   Nickname: The Heart of the Commonwealth, The City of the Seven Hills, Wormtown Settled: 1673 â€“ Incorporated: 1684 Zip Code(s): 01608 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ...


In 1899, he married Edna Stanton and they raised one son and three daughters.


In 1907, Michelson had the honor of being the first American to receive a Nobel Prize in Physics "for his optical precision instruments and the spectroscopic and metrological investigations carried out with their aid". He also won the Copley Medal in 1907, the Henry Draper Medal in 1916 and the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1923. A crater on the Moon is named after him. 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... The Copley Medal is a scientific award for work in any field of science, the highest award granted by the Royal Society of London. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Henry Draper Medal was established by the widow of Henry Draper, and is awarded by the US National Academy of Sciences for contributions to astrophysics. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Gold Medal awarded to Asaph Hall The Gold Medal is the highest award of the Royal Astronomical Society. ... {{year nav|1939 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Tycho crater on Earths moon. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ...


Michelson died in Pasadena, California at the age of 78. The University of Chicago Residence Halls remembered Michelson and his achievements by dedicating Michelson House in his honor. Case Western Reserve has also dedicated a Michelson House to him, and an academic building at the United States Naval Academy also bears his name. Michelson Laboratory at China Lake Naval Weapons Center in Ridgecrest, California is named after him. There is an interesting display in the publicly accessible area of the Lab of Michelson's Nobel Prize medal, the actual prize document, and examples of his diffraction gratings. Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland, near Washington D.C. The Academy often is referred to simply as Annapolis although naval officers normally refer to it in conversation...


Speed of light

Early measurements

Conclusion page for the paper pictured above.

As early as 1877, while still serving as an officer in the US Navy, Michelson started planning a refinement of the rotating-mirror method of Léon Foucault for measuring the speed of light, using improved optics and a longer baseline. He conducted some preliminary measurements using largely improvised equipment in 1878 about which time his work came to the attention of Simon Newcomb, director of the Nautical Almanac Office who was already advanced in planning his own study. Michelson published his result of 299,910±50 km/s in 1879 before joining Newcomb in Washington DC to assist with his measurements there. Thus began a long professional collaboration and friendship between the two. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... ... Table of Opticks, 1728 Cyclopaedia Optics ( appearance or look in ancient Greek) is a branch of physics that describes the behavior and properties of light and the interaction of light with matter. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Simon Newcomb. ... HM Nautical Almanac Office in Britain. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Simon Newcomb. ... Flag Seal Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ...


Newcomb, with his more adequately funded project, obtained a value of 299,860±30 km/s, just at the extreme edge of consistency with Michelson's. Michelson continued to "refine" his method and in 1883 published a measurement of 299,853±60 km/s, rather closer to that of his mentor. Simon Newcomb. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Mount Wilson and Lookout Mountain 1920

In 1906, a novel electrical method was used by E. B. Rosa and N. E. Dorsey of the National Bureau of Standards to obtain a value for the speed of light of 299,781±10 km/s. Though this result has subsequently been shown to be severely biased by the poor electrical standards in use at the time, it seems to have set a fashion for rather lower measured values. 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... As a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration, the National Institute of Standards (NIST) develops and promotes measurement, standards, and technology to enhance productivity, facilitate trade, and improve the quality of life. ... A line showing the speed of light on a scale model of Earth and the Moon The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. ...


From 1920, Michelson started planning a definitive measurement from the Mount Wilson Observatory, using a baseline to Lookout Mountain, a prominent bump on the south ridge of Mount San Antonio (Old Baldy), some 22 miles distant. Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) is an astronomical observatory in Los Angeles County, California. ... Mount San Antonio, better known to most Angelenos as Old Baldy or Mount Baldy, is the highest peak in the San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California, USA. While not as unique in its landscape as Seattles Mount Rainier, they are similar in being easily sighted for miles around their...


In 1922, the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey began two years of painstaking measurement of the baseline using the recently available invar tapes. With the baseline length established in 1924, measurements were carried out over the next two years to obtain the published value of 299,796±4 km/s. Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... The U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey was established by President Thomas Jefferson in 1807 as the Survey of the Coast. ... Invar, also called FeNi36, is an alloy of iron (64%) and nickel (36%) with some carbon and chromium. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Famous as the measurement is, it was beset by problems, not least of which was the haze created by the smoke from forest fires which blurred the mirror image. It is also probable that the intensively detailed work of the Geodetic Survey, with an estimated error of less than one part in 1 million, was compromised by a shift in the baseline arising from the Santa Barbara earthquake of 29 June 1925 which was an estimated magnitude of 6.3 on the Richter scale. It has been suggested that geodetic system be merged into this article or section. ... Santa Barbara is a city in California, United States. ... An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...


Michelson, Pease & Pearson 1932

The period after 1927 marked the advent of new measurements of the speed of light using novel electro-optic devices, all substantially lower than Michelson's 1926 value. 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... A line showing the speed of light on a scale model of Earth and the Moon The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness. ... Electro-optics is a branch of technology involving components, devices and systems which operate by modification of the optical properties of a material by an electric field. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Michelson sought another measurement but this time in an evacuated tube to avoid difficulties in interpreting the image owing to atmospheric effects. In 1930, he began a collaboration with Francis G. Pease and Fred Pearson to perform a measurement in a 1.6 km tube at Pasadena, California. Michelson died with only 36 of the 233 measurement series completed and the experiment was subsequently beset by geological instability and condensation problems before the result of 299,774±11 km/s, consistent with the prevailing electro-optic values, was published posthumously in 1935. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... Francis Gladheim Pease (1881–February 7, 1938) was an American astronomer. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Electro-optics is a branch of technology involving components, devices and systems which operate by modification of the optical properties of a material by an electric field. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Interferometry

In 1887 he collaborated with colleague Edward Williams Morley in the Michelson-Morley experiment. Their experiment for the expected motion of the Earth relative to the aether, the hypothetical medium in which light was supposed to travel, resulted in a null result. Though it may appear that Albert Einstein did not know of the work (according to his 1905 paper), it greatly assisted the acceptance of the theory of relativity... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Edward Morley (1887). ... The Michelson-Morley experiment, one of the most important and famous experiments in the history of physics, was performed in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley at what is now Case Western Reserve University, and is considered by some to be the first strong evidence against the theory of... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... The luminiferous aether: it was hypothesised that the Earth moves through a medium of aether that carries light In the late 19th century luminiferous aether (light-bearing aether) was the term used to describe a medium for the propagation of light. ... Prism splitting light Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye (visible light) or, in a technical or scientific context, electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength[1]. The elementary particle that defines light is the photon. ... Generally, a null result is a result which is null (nothing): that is, the absence of an observable result. ... Note: Albert Einstein is also the birth name of Albert Brooks. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Two-dimensional analogy of space-time curvature described in General Relativity. ...


Astronomical interferometry

In 1920-21 Michelson and Francis G. Pease famously became the first people to measure the diameter of a star other than our Sun. They used an astronomical interferometer at the Mount Wilson Observatory to measure the diameter of the super-giant star Betelgeuse. A periscope arrangement was used to obtain a densified pupil in the interferometer, a method later investigated in detail by Labeyrie for use in with "Hypertelescopes". The measurement of stellar diameters and the separations of binary stars took up an increasing amount of Michelson's life after this. Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Francis Gladheim Pease (1881–February 7, 1938) was an American astronomer. ... Diagram showing a possible layout for an astronomical interferometer, with the mirrors laid out in a parabolic arrangement (similar to the shape of a conventional telescope mirror). ... The Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) is an astronomical observatory in Los Angeles County, California. ... Betelgeuse (Alpha (α) Orionis) (also written Betelguese and Betelgeux) is a semiregular variable star located 427 light-years away [1]. It is the second brightest star in the constellation Orion, and the ninth brightest star in the night sky. ... French astronomer, graduated from the grande école SupOptique (École supérieure doptique), he is the inventor of the interferometric astronomy. ...


Michelson in popular culture

The television series Bonanza commissioned a fictionalized teleplay (Look to the Stars, broadcast March 18, 1962) in which Ben Cartwright (Lorne Greene) helps the 16-year-old Albert Abraham Michelson (portrayed by 25-year-old Douglas Lambert (1936-1986))obtain an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy, despite the opposition of the anti-semitic town schoolteacher (William Schallert). Bonanza was set in and around Virginia City, Nevada, where Michelson lived with his parents prior to leaving for the Naval Academy. In the postscript to the episode, Greene mentions Michelson's 1907 Nobel Prize. The Bonanza logo was superimposed upon a map of a wild west frontier area. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... Lorne Greene in his role as Ben Cartwright in Bonanza Lorne Greene as Commander Adama in Battlestar Galactica Lorne Greene O.C., LL.D. (February 12, 1915 – September 11, 1987) was a Canadian actor best known for two iconic roles on American television. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... William Schallert (born July 6, 1922 in Los Angeles, California), is a very tall actor who has appeared in many movies and television series such as The Smurfs, Gunsmoke, and Get Smart. ... View of Virginia City, Nevada, from a nearby hillside, 1867-68 Virginia City is a city located in Storey County, Nevada. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. ...


Tribute

The premises of The Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... The American Physical Society was founded in 1899 and is the worlds second largest organization of physicists. ... The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an organization that promotes cooperation between scientists, defends scientific freedom, encourages scientific responsibility and supports scientific education for the betterment of all humanity. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Not to be confused with the Rumford Medal In 1796, Benjamin Thompson, known as Count Rumford, gave $5000 separately to the Royal Society of London and the other by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to give awards every two years for outstanding scientific research on heat or light. ... The Matteucci Medal was established to award physicists for their fundamental contributions. ... The Copley Medal is a scientific award for work in any field of science, the highest award granted by the Royal Society of London. ... Gold Medal awarded to Asaph Hall The Gold Medal is the highest award of the Royal Astronomical Society. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

Electronic books

Project Gutenberg logo Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works via book scanning. ...

References

  • Livingston, D. M. (1973). The Master of Light: A Biography of Albert A. Michelson ISBN 0-226-48711-3—biography by Michelson's daughter

External links

Persondata
NAME Michelson, Albert Abraham
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Physicist
DATE OF BIRTH December 29, 1852
PLACE OF BIRTH Strzelno, Poland
DATE OF DEATH May 9, 1931
PLACE OF DEATH Pasadena, California

  Results from FactBites:
 
Albert Abraham Michelson (285 words)
Albert Abraham Michelson (December 19, 1852 - May 9, 1931), an American physicist known for his work on the determination of the speed of light.
Early on, Michelson was fascinated with the sciences and the problem of measuring the speed of light, in particular.
After serving as professor at Clark University[?] at Worcester, Massachusetts from 1889, in 1892 Michelson was appointed professor and the first head of the department of physics at the newly organized University of Chicago.
Albert Abraham Michelson at AllExperts (1316 words)
Albert Abraham Michelson, (pronunciation anglicized as "Michael-son", December 19, 1852 - May 9, 1931), was a Polish-born physicist known for his work on the measurement of the speed of light, and especially for the Michelson-Morley experiment.
Michelson was fascinated with the sciences and the problem of measuring the speed of light in particular.
Michelson died with only 36 of the 233 measurement series completed and the experiment was subsequently beset by geological instability and condensation problems before the result of 299,774±11 km/s, consistent with the prevailing electro-optic values, was published posthumously in 1935.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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