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Encyclopedia > Alban Berg
Bust of Alban Berg at Schiefling, Carinthia, Austria
Bust of Alban Berg at Schiefling, Carinthia, Austria

Alban Maria Johannes Berg (February 9, 1885December 24, 1935) was an Austrian composer. He was a member of the Second Viennese School with Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern, and produced compositions that combined Mahlerian romanticism with a personal adaptation of Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 3008 pixel, file size: 706 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 3008 pixel, file size: 706 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The Second Viennese School was a group of composers made up of Arnold Schoenberg and those who studied under him in early 20th century Vienna. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (the anglicized form of Schönberg — Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he left Germany and re-converted to Judaism in 1933; September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer. ... Anton Webern (December 3, 1883 – September 15, 1945) was an Austrian composer and conductor. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ... Twelve-tone technique (also dodecaphony) is a method of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. ...

Contents

Life and work

Berg was born in Vienna, the third of four children of Johanna and Conrad Berg. His family lived comfortably until the death of his father in 1900. For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


He was more interested in literature than music as a child and did not begin to compose until he was fifteen, when he started to teach himself music. In late February or early March of 1902 he fathered a child with Marie Scheuchl, a servant girl in the Berg family household. His daughter, Albine, was born on December 4, 1902.[1] Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Berg had little formal music education before he became a student of Arnold Schoenberg, in October 1904. With Schoenberg he studied counterpoint, music theory, and harmony. By 1906, he was studying music full-time; by 1907, he began composition lessons. His student compositions included five drafts for piano sonatas. He also wrote songs, including his Seven Early Songs (Sieben Frühe Lieder), three of which were Berg's first publicly performed work in a concert that featured the music of Schoenberg's pupils in Vienna that year. The early sonata sketches eventually culminated in Berg's Piano Sonata (Op. 1) (1907–8); it is one of the most formidable "first" works ever written (Lauder, 1986). For other uses, see Counterpoint (disambiguation). ... Music theory is a field of study that investigates the nature or mechanics of music. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Musical composition is a phrase used in a number of contexts, the most commonly used being a piece of music. ... A piano sonata is a sonata written for unaccompanied piano. ... The Seven Early Songs (Sieben frühe Lieder), written from 1905 to 1908, are early compositions of Alban Berg while he was still under the tutelage of Arnold Schoenberg. ... Alban Bergs Piano sonata is his only solo work given an opus number (Op. ... Opus, from the Latin word opus meaning work, is usually used in the sense of a work of art. In this sense the plural of opus, opera, is used to refer to the genre of music drama. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Berg studied with Schoenberg for six years until 1911. Berg admired him as a composer and mentor, and they remained close lifelong friends. Berg may have seen the older composer as a father figure, as Berg's father had died when he was only 15.


Among Schoenberg's teaching was the idea that the unity of a musical composition depends on all its aspects being derived from a single basic idea; this idea was later known as developing variation. Berg passed this on to his students, one of whom, Theodor Adorno, stated: "The main principle he conveyed was that of variation: everything was supposed to develop out of something else and yet be intrinsically different".[citation needed] The Piano Sonata is an example—the whole composition is derived from the work's opening quartal gesture and its opening phrase. Max Horkheimer (front left), Theodor Adorno (front right), and Jürgen Habermas in the background, right, in 1965 at Heidelberg. ... ( Listen) Four tone quartal chord In music, quartal harmony is the building of chordal and melodic structures with a distinct preference for intervals of fourths. ...


Berg was a part of Vienna's cultural elite during the heady fin de siècle period. His circle included the musicians Alexander von Zemlinsky and Franz Schreker, the painter Gustav Klimt, the writer and satirist Karl Kraus, the architect Adolf Loos, and the poet Peter Altenberg. In 1906, Berg met the singer Helene Nahowski, daughter of a wealthy family; despite the outward hostility of her family, the two were married on May 3, 1911. Fin de siècle is French for end of the century. The term turn-of-the-century is sometimes used as a synonym, but is more neutral (lacking some or most of the connotations described below), and can include the first years of a new century. ... Alexander von Zemlinsky Alexander Zemlinsky or Alexander von Zemlinsky, (October 14, 1871 – March 15, 1942) was an Austrian composer of classical music, conductor, and teacher. ... Franz Schreker (March 23, 1878 – March 21, 1934) was an Austrian composer and conductor. ... Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Art Nouveau (Vienna Secession) movement. ... Karl Kraus (April 28, 1874 - June 12, 1936) was an eminent Austrian writer and journalist, known as a satirist, essayist, aphorist, playwright and poet. ... Adolf Loos (December 10, 1870 in Brno, Moravia–August 8, 1933 in Vienna, Austria) was an early-20th century Viennese architect. ... Peter Altenberg (1859 - 1919) was a writer and poet from Vienna, Austria. ...


In 1913, two of Berg's Five Songs on Picture Postcard Texts by Peter Altenberg (1912) were premièred in Vienna, conducted by Schoenberg. Settings of aphoristic utterances, the songs are accompanied by a very large orchestra. The performance caused a riot, and had to be halted; the work was not performed in full until 1952 (and its full score remained unpublished until 1966). Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


From 1915 to 1918, Berg served in the Austrian Army and during a period of leave in 1917 he began work on his first opera, Wozzeck. After the end of World War I, he settled again in Vienna where he taught private pupils. He also helped Schoenberg run his Society for Private Musical Performances, which sought to create the ideal environment for the exploration and appreciation of unfamiliar new music by means of open rehearsals, repeat performances, and the exclusion of professional critics. Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Wozzeck is the first opera by the Austrian composer Alban Berg (1885-1935). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Society for Private Musical Performances (in German, the Verein für musikalische Privataufführungen) was an organisation founded in Vienna in the Autumn of 1918 by Arnold Schoenberg with the intention of making carefully rehearsed and comprehensible performances of modern music available to genuinely interested members of the musical...


Three excerpts from Wozzeck were performed in 1924, and this brought Berg his first public success. The opera, which Berg completed in 1922, was not performed in its entirety until December 14, 1925, when Erich Kleiber directed a performance in Berlin. Today Wozzeck is seen as one of Berg's most important works. Berg completed only the first two acts of his later opera, the critically acclaimed Lulu, before he died. For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Erich Kleiber (August 5, 1890 – January 27, 1956) was an Austrian-born conductor. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Lulu is an opera by the composer Alban Berg. ...


Berg's best-known piece is his elegiac Violin Concerto. Like much of his mature work, it employs a personal adaptation of Schoenberg's twelve tone technique that enables the composer to combine frank atonality with passages that use more traditional tonal harmonies; additionally, Berg incorporates quotations from historical tonal music, including a Bach chorale and a Carinthian folk song. The Violin Concerto was dedicated to Manon, the deceased daughter of architect Walter Gropius and Alma Schindler. Alban Bergs Violin Concerto was written in 1935 (the score is dated August 11, 1935). ... Twelve-tone technique is a system of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. ... Atonality describes music not conforming to the system of tonal hierarchies, which characterizes the sound of classical European music between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Carinthia (German: Kärnten, Slovenian: Koroška) is the southernmost Austrian state or Land; it is chiefly famous for its mountains and lakes. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... Alma Mahler Alma Mahler (August 31, 1879 - December 11, 1964), noted in her native Vienna for her beauty and intelligence, was the wife, successively, of one of the centurys leading composers (Gustav Mahler), architects (Walter Gropius), and novelists (Franz Werfel). ...


Other well known Berg compositions include the Lyric Suite (seemingly a significant influence on the String Quartet No. 3 of Béla Bartók[citation needed]), Three Pieces for Orchestra and the Chamber Concerto for violin, piano and 13 wind instruments. Lyric Suite is a six-movement work for string quartet written by Alban Berg between 1925 and 1926. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. ... The term Concerto (plural concertos or concerti) usually refers to a musical work in which one solo instrument is accompanied by an orchestra. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... A woodwind instrument is an instrument in which sound is produced by blowing against an edge or by a vibrating with air a thin piece of wood known as a reed. ...


Berg died in Vienna, on Christmas Eve 1935, apparently from blood poisoning caused by an insect bite. He was 50 years old. Blood poisoning, also known as septicaemia, is a bacterial infection that occurs when bacteria get into the bloodstream and multiply rapidly. ...


Douglas Jarman writes in the New Grove: "As the 20th century closed, the 'backward-looking' Berg suddenly came as Perle remarked, to look like its most forward-looking composer."[2] The Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is a dictionary of music and musicians, generally considered to be one of the best general reference sources on the subject. ...


Compositions

The compositions of Alban Berg Jugendlieder (1), composed 1901–4, voice and piano, published 1985 Herbstgefühl (Siefried Fleischer) Spielleute (Henrik Ibsen) Wo der Goldregen steht (F. Lorenz) Lied der Schiffermädels (Otto Julius Bierbaum) Sehnsucht I (Paul Hohenberg) Abschied (Elimar von Monsterberg-Muenckenau) Grenzen der Menschenheit (Johann Wolfgang...

Piano

Alban Bergs Piano sonata is his only solo work given an opus number (Op. ...

Strings

Alban Bergs Violin Concerto was written in 1935 (the score is dated August 11, 1935). ... Lyric Suite is a six-movement work for string quartet written by Alban Berg between 1925 and 1926. ...

Opera

Wozzeck is the first opera by the Austrian composer Alban Berg (1885-1935). ... Lulu is an opera by the composer Alban Berg. ...

Vocal

The Seven Early Songs (Sieben frühe Lieder), written from 1905 to 1908, are early compositions of Alban Berg while he was still under the tutelage of Arnold Schoenberg. ...

Bibliography

Analytical writings

  • Adorno, Theodor W. Alban Berg: Master of the Smallest Link. Trans. Juliane Brand and Christopher Hailey. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.
  • Schmalfeldt, Janet. "Berg’s Path to Atonality: The Piano Sonata, Op. 1". Alban Berg: Historical and Analytical Perspectives. Eds. David Gable and Robert P. Morgan, pgg. 79-110. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
  • Lauder, Robert Neil. Two Early Piano Works of Alban Berg: A Stylistic and Structural Analysis. Thesis. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1986.
  • Bruhn, Siglind, ed. Encrypted Messages in Alban Berg’s Music. New York: Garland Publishing, 1998.
  • Schweizer, Klaus. Die Sonatensatzform im Schaffen Alban Bergs. Stuttgart: Satz und Druck, 1970.
  • Wilkey, Jay Weldon. Certain Aspects of Form in the Vocal Music of Alban Berg. Ph.D. thesis. Ann Arbor: Indiana University, 1965.
  • Perle, George. The operas of Alban Berg. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980.
  • Jarman, Douglas. Dr. Schon's Five-Strophe Aria: Some Notes on Tonality and Pitch Association in Berg's Lulu. Perspectives of New Music 8/2 (Spring/Summer 1970).
  • Jarman, Douglas. Some Rhythmic and Metric Techniques in Alban Berg's Lulu. Musical Quarterly 56/3 (July 1970).
  • Jarman, Douglas. Lulu: The Sketches. International Alban Berg Society Newsletter, 6 (June 1978).
  • Jarman, Dougas. The Music of Alban Berg. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.
  • Jarman, Douglas. Countess Geschwitz's Series: A Controversy Resolved?. Proceedings of the Royal Musical Association 107 (1980/81).
  • Jarman, Douglas. Some Observations on Rhythm, Meter and Tempo in Lulu. In Alban Berg Studien. Ed. Rudolf Klein. Vienna: Universal Edition, 1981.
  • Jarman, Douglas. Lulu: The Musical and Dramatic Structure. Royal Opera House Covent Garden program notes, 1981.
  • Jarman, Douglas. The 'Lost' Score of the 'Symphonic Pieces from Lulu'. International Alban Berg Society Newsletter 12 (Fall/Winter 1982).

Biographical writings

  • Brand, Juliane, Christopher Hailey and Donald Harris, eds. The Berg-Schoenberg Correspondence: Selected Letters. New York: Norton, 1987.
  • Grun, Bernard, ed. Alban Berg: Letters to his Wife. London: Faber and Faber, 1971.
  • Redlich, H.F. Alban Berg, the Man and His Music. London: John Calder, 1957.
  • Reich, Willi. The life and work of Alban Berg. Trans. Cornelius Cardew. New York : Da Capo Press, 1982.
  • Monson, Karen. Alban Berg: a biography. London: Macdonald and Jane's, 1979.
  • Carner, Mosco. Alban Berg: the man and the work. London: Duckworth, 1975.
  • Redlich, Hans Ferdinand. Alban Berg, the man and his music. London: J. Calder, 1957.
  • Leibowitz, René. Schoenberg and his school; the contemporary stage of the language of music. Trans. Dika Newlin. New York: Philosophical Library, 1949.

Dika Newlin Dika Newlin (November 22, 1923—July 22, 2006) was a pianist, professor, composer and punk rock singer. ...

References

  • Douglas Jarman: "Alban Berg", Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (Accessed April 9, 2007), (subscription access)
  • The Oxford Dictionary of Opera, by John Warrack and Ewan West (1992), 782 pages, ISBN 0-19-869164-5

See also

This is a list of Austrian composers, singers and conductors: Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, composer and music theorist August Wilhelm Ambros, composer (19th century) Wolfgang Ambros, singer (Austropop) Christian Anders, singer Marianne von Auenbrugger, composer and pianist 1759-1782 Paul Badura-Skoda, pianist (born 1927) Ludwig van Beethoven, composer (born in... The following list is a selection of famous Austrians. ...

Notes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Jarman, Grove

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Alban Berg
Persondata
NAME Berg, Alban
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Berg, Alban Maria Johannes
SHORT DESCRIPTION Composer
DATE OF BIRTH February 9, 1885(1885-02-09)
PLACE OF BIRTH Vienna, Austria
DATE OF DEATH December 24, 1935
PLACE OF DEATH Vienna, Austria

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alban Berg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (878 words)
Berg was born in Vienna, the third of four children of Johanna and Conrad Berg.
Berg was a part of Vienna's cultural elite during the heady period of fin de siècle.
In 1906, Berg met Helene Nahowski, singer and daughter of a wealthy family, and despite the outward hostility of her family, married on May 3, 1911.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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