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Encyclopedia > Alastair Campbell

Alastair John Campbell (born May 25, 1957) was the Director of Communications and Strategy for 10 Downing Street. May 25 is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Public relations (PR): Building sustainable relations with all publics in order to create a postive brand image. ... Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ...

Contents

Early life

Alastair Campbell is the son of veterinarian Donald Campbell and his wife Elizabeth, a couple of Scottish origin who moved to Keighley, West Yorkshire when the elder Campbell became a partner in a veterinary practice there. Alastair has two elder brothers, Donald and Graham, and a younger sister, Elizabeth. Look up veterinarian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... Keighley (pronounced Keith-ly or ) is a town and civil parish in the county of West Yorkshire, England, northwest of Bradford, on the meeting point of the River Aire and the River Worth. ... West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. ...


Alastair attended City of Leicester School and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he studied modern languages (French and German, for which Campbell received a 2:1, or Upper Second) and claimed that he wrote essays based solely on criticism and did not always read the works themselves. Campbell spent a year in the South of France as part of his degree. Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... A B.A. issused as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ...


Campbell also became interested in journalism. His first published work was "Inter-City Ditties", his winning entry to a readers' competition run by pornographic magazine Forum. This led to a lengthy stint working for Forum, writing articles such as "The Riviera Gigolo" and "Busking with Bagpipes" which Campbell purported to be based on autobiographical events.[1] Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφια pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ...


He was appointed as a sports reporter on the Tavistock Times. He was promoted to the news pages where his first major story was the loss of the Penlee lifeboat with all its crew. It was as a trainee on the Daily Mirror in Plymouth that he met his partner Fiona Millar. Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Plymouth is a city of 243,795 inhabitants (2001 census) in the south-west of England, or alternatively the West Country, and is situated within the traditional and ceremonial county of Devon at the mouths of the rivers Plym and Tamar and at the head of one of the world... Fiona Millar is a British journalist and high profile education campaigner. ...


National newspapers

Campbell later moved to the London office of the Mirror where he became a political correspondent. However, his rapid rise and stressful job led to substance abuse and a psychotic breakdown in 1986. Campbell partially recovered and has become teetotal.[2] He rebuilt his career and became Political Editor of the Daily Mirror; as the largest circulation left-wing paper, he was a close advisor of Neil Kinnock and worked closely with Robert Maxwell. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Substance abuse refers to the overindulgence in and dependence on a psychoactive leading to effects that are detrimental to the individuals physical health or mental health, or the welfare of others. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. ... Robert Maxwell Ian Robert Maxwell MC (June 10, 1923 – November 5, 1991) was a Czechoslovakian-born British media proprietor and formerly Member of Parliament (MP), who rose from poverty to build an extensive publishing empire. ...


After leaving the Mirror, Campbell became Political Editor of Today, a full colour tabloid newspaper launched in the 1980s that was then trying to turn leftward. Campbell was working there when John Smith died in 1994. He was a well-known face and helped to interview the three candidates for the new Labour Party leader; it was later revealed that he had already formed links with Tony Blair. John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


Work for Tony Blair

Shortly after Blair won and became leader of the opposition, Campbell left the newspaper to become his spokesman. He played an important role in the run-up to the 1997 general election, working with Peter Mandelson to co-ordinate Labour's campaign. Campbell intervened personally to complain whenever media outlets ran stories he felt were unhelpful to the campaign, and was not afraid to attack journalists personally when they displeased him. When Blair became Prime Minister in 1997, Campbell became his Director of Communications and in charge of the government's press machine. 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As the New Labour government found its feet, Blair relied for his political advice on a close circle of his own staff. Campbell was seen as particularly influential, and was sometimes referred to as the "real Deputy Prime Minister". His influence was certainly greater than his job title suggested: along with Jonathan Powell he was given the authority to direct Civil Servants, who previously had taken instructions only from ministers. Campbell's control of the traditional Lobby System under which a select group of accredited journalists were given privileged access to the Prime Minister's spokesman (and the journalistic kudos that this access could bring) meant that he wielded a good deal of power over the media, as previous Press Secretaries had found. Unlike his predecessors, he had been a political appointment and had not come through the Civil Service. New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Byzantine civil service in action. ...


After 2001

When Blair won a second term on June 7, 2001 Campbell took a step back from the job of briefing journalists and was appointed as the "Prime Minister's Director of Communications and Strategy". This gave him a strategic role in overseeing government communications. He was sometimes regarded with suspicion (if not outright hostility) by elements of the Labour Party and Blair's political opponents who felt he minimised the role of members of the government and members of Parliament. However, those who worked closely with him describe an aggressive but funny and loyal colleague, who inspired loyalty in others. Even his most severe critics regarded him as adept in the techniques of news management. He was memorably sponsored by the US President George W. Bush to complete a marathon in aid of a cancer charity, which he had supported since a journalist colleague died early of the disease. June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... News management is the process by which individuals and organizations (especially political parties) control information and their interactions with the news media to achieve some strategic objective. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Iraq War

In February 2003 he was a central figure in the alleged "dodgy dossier" controversy. A dossier on Iraqi concealment of Weapons of mass destruction and human rights abuses under Saddam Hussein was published on February 3. The dossier purported to be based on intelligence but a large section had been taken (unacknowledged) from a PhD thesis available on the internet. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The briefing paper entitled Iraq: Its Infrastructure of Concealment, Deception and Intimidation has come to be known as the Dodgy Dossier. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


A few months later he became embroiled in further controversy after the BBC reporter Andrew Gilligan broadcast claims that the government had included evidence it knew to be false (famously described as "sexed up" by another BBC journalist) an earlier dossier (about Iraqi Weapons of Mass Destruction). In a later newspaper article Gilligan said that his source had specifically identified Campbell himself as responsible for the alleged exaggerations. Campbell demanded a retraction and apology from the BBC, but none was forthcoming. The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Andrew Gilligan Andrew Paul Gilligan (born 22 November 1968, Teddington, Middlesex, England) is a journalist best known for his report, while defence and diplomatic correspondent for BBC Radio 4s The Today Programme, about the British Governments dossier on weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. ... For the album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ...


The BBC's source David Kelly identified himself to his employers at the Ministry of Defence. The government released this news and under questioning from newspapers desperate to identify the source gave sufficient hints for his identity to become public. Kelly committed suicide shortly afterward and the Hutton inquiry into the circumstances of his death pushed Campbell further into the limelight. The Inquiry showed that Campbell had been working closely with the Intelligence Services, and made suggestions about the wording of the dossier. He had also been keen that Kelly's identity be made public writing in his diary "It would fuck Gilligan if that were his source". However, Lord Hutton cleared Campbell of acting improperly, as the Joint Intelligence Committee had taken all editorial decisions. Hutton also found that Kelly's name would have had to be made public to avoid allegations of a cover-up. The Hutton report was widely criticised in the media, however, and Campbell's "Presidential"-style press conference afterwards was perceived by some to be misjudged, with Campbell attacked for appearing to gloat over the BBC's misfortune. This criticism increased when Campbell sold a signed copy of the Hutton report at a charity auction. For other persons named David Kelly, see David Kelly (disambiguation). ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... The Hutton Inquiry was a British judicial inquiry chaired by Lord Hutton, appointed by the British government to investigate the death of a government weapons expert, Dr. David Kelly. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


Resignation

On 29 August 2003 he announced his resignation from 10 Downing Street. Throughout his time in Downing Street, he kept a diary which eventually totalled two million words. Selected extracts will be published by the Random House Group in a volume titled The Blair Years, which Campbell says will not be released until after Tony Blair leaves office[3]. Campbell now spends most of his time giving occasional public talks and supporting his favourite football team, Burnley F.C. August 29 is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ... Downing Street Downing Street gates Downing Street is the street in London which contains the buildings that have been, for over two hundred years, the official residences of two of the most senior British cabinet ministers, the First Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Prime Minister of... Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... Cover of The Blair Years. ... Burnley Football Club are a professional football club based in Burnley, in north-east Lancashire, England. ...


2005

Campbell worked once again for the Labour Party in the run up to the May 2005 General Election [1]. Although never given any official title he was effectively the party's director of communications for the campaign, directing the party's media work and closely advising Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, Alan Milburn and John Reid - who were the most prominent politicians in Labour's team. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Rt Hon. ... John Reid (born 8 May 1947) is a British politician who is Home Secretary and Member of Parliament for the Scottish constituency of Airdrie and Shotts. ...


Sir Clive Woodward recruited Campbell to manage relations with the press for the British and Irish Lions tour to New Zealand in 2005. The appointment proved to be controversial with Campbell being roundly criticised by many in the media for his predilection for spin and for his lack of rugby knowledge and experience. They also resented the fact that Campbell wrote an exclusive column for The Times during the tour which they saw as a conflict of interest. However on the Lions return to the British Isles after their unsuccessful tour Woodward praised Campbell for having done a "fantastic job". Sir Clive Ronald Woodward (born 6 January 1956 at Ely in Cambridgeshire) is a former English rugby union international who was the coach of the England rugby union team from 1997 to 2004. ... For the Great Britain Lions rugby league football team of similiar title, go to Great Britain national rugby league team First match Otago 3 - 8 Lions (as Great Britain) (28 April 1888) Largest win Manawatu 6 - 109 Lions (28 June 2005) Worst defeat New Zealand 38 - 6 Lions (16 July... The 2005 Lions tour logo In 2005 the British and Irish Lions Rugby union team toured New Zealand for the first time since 1993, suffering a 3-0 whitewash at the hands of the New Zealand All Blacks. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional or personal interests. ...


E-mail scandal

He was involved in a scandal over an email he sent from his BlackBerry, intended for party chief Adrian McMenamin, that was actually sent to Newsnight journalist Andrew McFadyen (who has the same initials) by mistake. It read, in part: The BlackBerry is a wireless handheld device introduced in 1999 which supports push e-mail, mobile telephone, text messaging, internet faxing, web browsing and other wireless information services. ... Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22:30 and 23:20 on weekdays on BBC Two. ...

Just spoke to trev. think tbwa shd give statement to newsnight saying party and agency work together well and nobody here has spoken to standard. Posters done by tbwa according to political brief. Now fuck off and cover something important you twats!

Again, his language caused scandal.


Character and attitudes

Campbell is generally regarded as believing in a more traditional form of Labour politics than Tony Blair. His partner Fiona Millar has openly opposed Labour policy on education. Since his retirement from Downing Street, Campbell has been highly critical of political reporting in general and the Daily Mail group of newspapers in particular. Like Tony Blair, Campbell attempted (without complete success) to shield his children from the press attention which their father's job attracted. When briefing the press, he was known for a no-nonsense approach, but did on occasion alleviate it with humour: after a series of notably poor predictions about a Government reshuffle he distributed CDs by the band Garbage to those reporters who had made the most errors. "Garbagic" was the polite, made-up word Campbell used to describe a story he did not like. The Daily Mail is a British tabloid newspaper first published in 1896. ... A Compact Disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... Garbage is a Scottish/American rock group formed in Madison, Wisconsin, in 1994. ...


Screen portrayals

In 2005, Campbell was played by Jonathan Cake in the Channel 4 television film The Government Inspector, based on the David Kelly Case. The following year, he was portrayed by Mark Bazeley in the Stephen Frears film The Queen. British actor Jonathan Cake (b. ... It has been suggested that Channel Four Television Corporation be merged into this article or section. ... The Inspector General or The Government Inspector (in Russian, Ревизор) is a satirical play by 19th century Russian playwright and novelist Nikolai Gogol, published and produced in 1836. ... Stephen Frears in Sweden, 1989 promoting his movie Dangerous Liaisons. ... The Queen is an Academy Award-winning British 2006 film directed by Stephen Frears and written by Peter Morgan. ...


Peter Capaldi's character, Malcolm Tucker (an aggressive, foul-mouthed Scottish Director of Communications), in the critically acclaimed 2005 BBC television satire The Thick of It is modelled on Campbell. Peter Capaldi as Mark Jenkins in Skins. ... The Thick of It is a British comedy television series, which satirises the inner workings of modern British government. ...


Trivia

  • Campbell is an accomplished bagpipe player, in some demand at Burns Suppers every January.

Fiona Millar is a British journalist and high profile education campaigner. ... In the United Kingdom, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? is a television game show which offers a maximum cash prize of one million pounds for correctly answering successive multiple-choice questions of increasing difficulty. ... The BBC have recorded a special celebrity version of The Apprentice UK in order to raise money for Comic Relief, with the working title of Comic Relief Does The Apprentice[1] Five male celebrities and five female celebrities will take part in the show. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ...

References

  1. ^ Oborne, Peter and Simon Walters (2004). Alastair Campbell. Aurum. ISBN 1-84513-001-4. pp. 25-32.
  2. ^ "Blair's spin doctor talks of breakdown", BBC, 2002-01-07. Retrieved on 2007-03-26. 
  3. ^ "Secret diary of Alastair Campbell to hit shelves soon after Blair quits", Times Online, 2007-03-09. Retrieved on 2007-03-26. 

Peter Oborne is a journalist, commentator, and author, and political editor of The Spectator newspaper. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Publications

Cover of The Blair Years. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

Further reading

  • Jones, Nicholas (2000). Sultans of Spin: The Media and the New Labour Government. Orion Books. ISBN 0-75282-769-3.
  • Oborne, Peter and Simon Walters (2004). Alastair Campbell. Aurum. ISBN 1-84513-001-4.
  • Rawnsley, Andrew (2001). Servants of the People: The Inside Story of New Labour. Penguin Books. ISBN 0-140-27850-8.
  • Seldon, Anthony (2005). Blair. The Free Press. ISBN 0-7432-3212-7.

Peter Oborne is a journalist, commentator, and author, and political editor of The Spectator newspaper. ... Andrew Nicholas James Rawnsley (born January 5, 1962) is a British political journalist and broadcaster. ... Dr Anthony F. Seldon MA, PhD, FRSA, MBA, FRHisS is a political commentator best known as Tony Blairs biographer and the Master of Wellington College. ...

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