FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Alaska" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Alaska
State of Alaska
Flag of Alaska State seal of Alaska
Flag of Alaska Seal
Nickname(s): The Last Frontier
Motto(s): North to the Future
Map with Alaska highlighted
Official language(s) none
Spoken language(s) English 85.7%,
Native North American 5.2%,
Spanish 2.9%
Demonym Alaskan
Capital Juneau
Largest city Anchorage
Area  Ranked 1st in the US
 - Total 663,267 sq mi
(1,717,855 km²)
 - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)
 - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)
 - % water 13.77
 - Latitude 51°20'N to 71°50'N
 - Longitude 130°W to 172°E
Population  Ranked 47th in the US
 - Total 626,932
 - Density 1.09/sq mi 
0.42/km² (50th in the US)
 - Median income  US$54,627 (6th)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Mount McKinley[1]
20,320 ft  (6,193.7 m)
 - Mean 1900 ft  (580 m)
 - Lowest point Pacific Ocean[1]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  January 3, 1959 (49th)
Governor Sarah Palin (R)
Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell (R)
U.S. Senators Ted Stevens (R)
Lisa Murkowski (R)
Congressional Delegation Don Young (R) (list)
Time zones  
 - east of 169° 30' Alaska: UTC-9/DST-8
 - west of 169° 30' Aleutian: UTC-10/DST-9
Abbreviations AK US-AK
Website www.alaska.gov
Alaska State Symbols
Living Symbols
 -Bird Willow Ptarmigan
 -Fish King Salmon
 -Flower Forget-me-not
 -Insect Four-spotted Skimmer Dragonfly
 -Mammal Moose, Bowhead whale
 -Tree Sitka Spruce
Fossil Woolly mammoth
Mineral Gold
Rock Jade
Slogan(s) Beyond Your Dreams, Within Your Reach
Soil Tanana
Song(s) Alaska's Flag
Sport Mushing
Route Marker(s)
Alaska Route Marker
Quarter
Alaska quarter
2008
See Also


Alaska (IPA: /əˈlæskə/, Russian: Аляска Alyaska) is a state in the United States of America, in the northwest of the North American continent. It is the largest U.S. state by area (by a substantial margin), and one of the wealthiest (per capita) and most racially diverse.[2][3] // Alaska is a state in the United States of America. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alaska. ... Image File history File links AlaskaStateSealTransparent. ... The flag of Alaska The flag of Alaska consists of eight gold stars, forming the Big Dipper and the North Star, on a dark blue field. ... The Alaska State Seal was first adopted before statehood, when the area was know as the District of Alaska. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language, with a majority of English speakers being monolingual. ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Juneau redirects here. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... USD redirects here. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Denali redirects here. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Sarah Heath Palin (née Sarah Louise Heath, born February 11, 1964 in Sandpoint, Idaho) is the current Governor of Alaska. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Sean R. Parnell (November 19, 1962 in Hanford, California) is the current Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, United States, taking office in 2006 alongside governor Sarah Palin. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the senator. ... Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Donald Edwin (Don) Young (born June 9, 1933) has been the sole congressman from Alaska in the United States House of Representatives since 1973. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Alaska to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Alaska Standard Time Zone (AKST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting nine hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Hawaii-Aleutian Time Zone includes the state of Hawaii, and the Aleutian Islands west of 169º 30 W. It is the time zone located just west of the Alaska Standard Time Zone. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Lagopus lagopus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Willow Grouse (Lagopus lagopus) is a medium-sized bird in the grouse family. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name (Walbaum, 1792) The Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (derived from Russian чавыча), is a species of anadromous fish in the salmon family. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Species about 50 The Forget-me-nots are the genus Myosotis of flowering plants in the family Boraginaceae. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Libellula quadrimaculata (Linnaeus, 1758) The Four-spotted Chaser, Libellula quadrimaculata, is a European dragonfly. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Bowhead whale range The Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus), also known as Greenland Right Whale or Arctic Whale, is a baleen whale of the right whale family Balaenidae. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Binomial name Picea sitchensis (Bong. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... For the rock band, see Wooly Mammoth (band). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jade (jadeite) buttons Unworked Jade Jade is used as an ornamental stone, the term jade is applied to two different rocks that are made up of different silicate minerals. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of official U.S. state soils: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Alaskas Flag is the state song of Alaska. ... A team of six white, husky-type dogs Mushing also means playing on a MUSH. Mushing also can be used to describe the kneading behavior of domestic cats when they are content or are preparing to settle for a nap. ... Highways in the United States are split into at least four different types of systems. ... Image File history File links Alaska_5_shield. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... These are lists of U.S. state insignia as designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures List of U.S. state amphibians List of U.S. state beverages List of U.S. state birds List of U.S. state butterflies List of U.S. state colors List of U... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... North American redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ...


The area that became Alaska was purchased from the Russian Empire on March 30, 1867, for 7.2 million dollars (at 2 cents per acre) after Congress concluded its resources could be vitally important to the nation's future growth. The land went through several administrative changes before becoming an organized territory on May 11, 1912 and the 49th state of the U.S. on January 3, 1959. The name "Alaska" was already introduced in the Russian colonial time, when it was only used for the peninsula and is derived from the Aleut alaxsxaq, meaning "the mainland," or more literally, "the object towards which the action of the sea is directed."[4] It is also known as Alyeska, the "great land", an Aleut word derived from the same root. The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... In the history of the United States, an organized territory is a territory for which the United States Congress has enacted an Organic Act. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aleut (Unangam Tunuu) is a language of the Eskimo-Aleut language family. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Contents

Geography

Alaska is one of two U.S. states not bordered by another state, Hawaii being the other. Alaska has more coastline than all the other U.S. states combined.[5] It is the only non-contiguous U.S. state on continental North America; about 500 miles (800 km) of Canadian territory separate Alaska from Washington State. Alaska is thus an exclave of the United States, part of the continental U.S. but is not part of the contiguous U.S.[6] Juneau, Alaska's capital city, though located on the mainland of the North American continent, is inaccessible by land—no roads connect Juneau to the rest of the North American highway system. This article is about the U.S. State. ... A coastal image featured on a United States postal stamp. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... The continental United States is a term referring to the United States situated on the North American continent. ... Flag Seal Location Location in Juneau City and Borough, Alaska Coordinates , Government Country State Borough United States Alaska Juneau City and Borough Founded Incorporated 1881 1890 Mayor Bruce Botelho Geographical characteristics Area     City 8,430. ... Capital City is a 60-minute television show produced by Euston Films that ran for 13 episodes in 1989 on ITV. This drama focused on the lives of investment bankers in London living and working on the corporate trading floor for the fictional international bank Shane-Longman. ... Flag Seal Location Location in Juneau City and Borough, Alaska Coordinates , Government Country State Borough United States Alaska Juneau City and Borough Founded Incorporated 1881 1890 Mayor Bruce Botelho Geographical characteristics Area     City 8,430. ...


The state is bordered by Yukon Territory and British Columbia, Canada, to the east, the Gulf of Alaska and the Pacific Ocean to the south, the Bering Sea, Bering Strait, and Chukchi Sea to the west and the Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Ocean to the north. This article is about the Canadian territory. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... The Gulf of Alaska is an arm of the Pacific Ocean defined by the curve of the southern coast of Alaska, stretching from the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Island in the west to the Alexander Archipelago in the east, where Glacier Bay and the Inside Passage are found. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Sea Bering Sea and the North Pacific Ocean Bearing Sea with Kamchatka Peninsula and Alaska The Bering (or Imarpik) Sea is a body of water north of, and separated from, the north Pacific Ocean by the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Strait Photo across the Bering Strait Nautical chart of the Bering Strait The Bering Strait (Russian: ) is a sea strait between Cape Dezhnev, Russia, the easternmost point (169°43 W) of the Asian continent and Cape Prince of Wales, Alaska, the westernmost point (168°05... Chukchi Sea (Russian: Чуко́тское мо́ре) is a marginal sea of the Arctic Ocean, between Chukotka and Alaska. ... Approximate area of the Beaufort Sea, and the disputed waters The Beaufort Sea is a large body of water north of The Northwest Territories, the Yukon, and Alaska and west of Canadas arctic islands that is a part of the Arctic Ocean. ...


Alaska is the largest state in the United States in land area at 570,380 square miles (1.477277×106 km²), more than twice as large as Texas, the next largest state. It is larger than all but 18 sovereign nations. For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


Alaska is larger than the combined area of either:

or For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

  • Also, comparing with territory outside the United States, Alaska is larger than:

Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, and the United Kingdom combined. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...

Near Little Port Walter in Southeast Alaska.
Near Little Port Walter in Southeast Alaska.
Mount Sanford in the Wrangell Mountains.
Mount Sanford in the Wrangell Mountains.

One scheme for describing the state's geography is by labeling the regions: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1772x1164, 1296 KB) Description: Looking back to Little Port Walter Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1772x1164, 1296 KB) Description: Looking back to Little Port Walter Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Nushagak River is a river in southwest Alaska, at about 60°50 North 154° West. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Wrangell Mountains The Wrangell Mountains are a high mountain range in southeast Alaska in the United States and the southwest Yukon Territory in Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Kenai River, Alaska, in August 2003 The Kenai River, Alaska, in March 2007 The Kenai River is a river in the Kenai Peninsula of south central Alaska. ... The Kenai Peninsula in Alaska The Kenai Peninsula is a large peninsula jutting from the southern coast of Alaska in the United States. ...

The northeast corner of Alaska is covered by the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which covers 19,049,236 acres (77,090 km²). Much of the northwest is covered by the larger National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska, which covers around 23,000,000 acres (93,100 km²). The Arctic is Alaska's most remote wilderness. A location in the National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska is 120 miles (190 km) miles from any town or village, the geographic point most remote from permanent habitation in the USA. South Central Alaska consists of the portion of the U.S. state of Alaska from the shorelines and uplands of the Gulf of Alaska. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Palmer depot with a narrow gauge locomotive. ... For the Sarmatian god of the same name, see Wasilla (god) Wasilla is a town in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Petro redirects here. ... Tourist redirects here. ... A military base is a facility directly owned and operated by and/or for the military or one of its branches that shelters military equipment and personnel, and facilitates training and operations. ... The Alaska Panhandle is the coast of the American state of Alaska, just west of the northern half of the Canadian province of British Columbia. ... Juneau redirects here. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... A MODIS photograph of the Alexander Archipelago The Alexander Archipelago is an archipelago, or group of islands, off the southeast coast of Alaska. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Sea Bering Sea and the North Pacific Ocean Bearing Sea with Kamchatka Peninsula and Alaska The Bering (or Imarpik) Sea is a body of water north of, and separated from, the north Pacific Ocean by the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Sea Bering Sea and the North Pacific Ocean Bearing Sea with Kamchatka Peninsula and Alaska The Bering (or Imarpik) Sea is a body of water north of, and separated from, the north Pacific Ocean by the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. ... Shore of Bristol Bay near Naknek. ... For other uses, see Sockeye (disambiguation). ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Katmai National Park and Preserve is a United States National Park in southern Alaska, notable for the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and for its brown bears. ... Established in 1980 by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is a United States National Park in southwestern Alaska. ... Cook Inlet, showing Knik and Turnagain Arms The Cook Inlet or Nuti Inlet is a large inlet of the Gulf of Alaska in south-central Alaska. ... Shore of Bristol Bay near Naknek. ... Volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula The Alaska Peninsula is a peninsula extending about 800 km (500 miles) to the southwest from the mainland of Alaska and ending in the Aleutian Islands. ... Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Ursus arctos Linnaeus, 1758 The Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) is a species of bear that can reach weights of 130-700 kg (300 to 1500 pounds). ... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus The reindeer, known as caribou in North America, is an Arctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... A marine mammal is a mammal that is primarily ocean-dwelling or depends on the ocean for its food. ... Fall in Interior Alaska The interior of Alaska makes up most of the state. ... Fairbanks redirects here. ... The speedy deletion of this page is contested. ... The Yukon River is a major watercourse of northwestern North America. ... The Kuskokwim River (Kusquqvak in Central Yupik) is a river, approximately 724 mi (1,165 km) long, in southwest Alaska in the United States. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... For other uses, see Tundra (disambiguation). ... The Bush is a cultural as well as geographic division of the state of Alaska in the United States. ... Aerial view of the harbor in Nome Nome is a city located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast of Norton Sound in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Bethel (Mamterilleq in Central Alaskan Yupik) is a city located in Bethel Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, 340 miles (540 km) west of Anchorage. ... Kotzebue is a city located in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska (NPR-A) is an area of land in the North Slope of Alaska owned by the United States Federal Government. ...


With its myriad islands, Alaska has nearly 34,000 miles (54,720 km) of tidal shoreline. The Aleutian Islands chain extends west from the southern tip of the Alaska Peninsula. Many active volcanoes are found in the Aleutians. Unimak Island, for example, is home to Mount Shishaldin which is a moderately active volcano that rises to 9,980 feet (3,042 m) above sea level. The chain of volcanoes extends to Mount Spurr, west of Anchorage on the mainland. Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... Volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula The Alaska Peninsula is a peninsula extending about 800 km (500 miles) to the southwest from the mainland of Alaska and ending in the Aleutian Islands. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Unimak Island is the largest island in Alaskas Aleutian Islands chain. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Stratovolcanoes | Volcanoes of Alaska | Alaska mountains ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Mount Spurr is a volcano in the Aleutian Volcanic Arc of Alaska, named after United States Geological Survey geologist and explorer Josiah Edward Spurr, who led an expedition to the area in 1898. ...


One of North America's largest tides occurs in Turnagain Arm, just south of Anchorage - tidal differences can be more than 35 feet (10.7 m). (Many sources say Turnagain has the second-greatest tides in North America, but several areas in Canada have larger tides.[7]) Cook Inlet, showing Knik and Turnagain Arms The Cook Inlet or Nuti Inlet is a large inlet of the Gulf of Alaska in south-central Alaska. ...


Alaska has more than 3 million lakes [8][9] Marshlands and wetland permafrost cover 188,320 square miles (4.87747×105 km²) (mostly in northern, western and southwest flatlands). Frozen water, in the form of glacier ice, covers some 16,000 square miles (41,440 km²) of land and 1,200 square miles (3,110 km²) of tidal zone. The Bering Glacier complex near the southeastern border with Yukon, Canada, covers 2,250 square miles (5,827 km²) alone. For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ... While these two men dig in Alaska to study soil, the hard permafrost requires the use of a jackhammer In geology, permafrost or permafrost soil is soil at or below the freezing point of water (0 °C or 32 °F) for two or more years. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Terminus of Bering Glacier, September 29, 2002 Bering Glacier is a glacier in Alaska. ... This article is about the Canadian territory. ...


The Aleutian Islands cross longitude 180°, so Alaska can be considered the easternmost state as well as the westernmost. Alaska, and especially the Aleutians, are one of the extreme points of the United States. The International Date Line jogs west of 180° to keep the whole state, and thus the entire continental United States, within the same legal day. Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... Longitude is the east-west geographic coordinate measurement most commonly utilized in cartography and global navigation. ... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... “Date line” redirects here. ...


According to an October 1998 report by the United States Bureau of Land Management, approximately 65% of Alaska is owned and managed by the U.S. federal government as public lands, including a multitude of national forests, national parks, and national wildlife refuges. Of these, the Bureau of Land Management manages 87 million acres (350,000 km²), or 23.8% of the state. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is managed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. US BLM logo The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior which administers Americas public lands, totaling 262 million acres (1,060,000 km²) or one-eighth of the landmass of the country. ... United States Government redirects here. ... U.S. National Forests are protected forests and woodland areas in the United States. ... This article is about national parks. ... National Wildlife Refuge is a designation for certain protected areas of the United States managed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. ... US BLM logo The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior which administers Americas public lands, totaling approximately 261 million surface acres (1,056,229. ... The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ... The USFWS logo The United States Fish and Wildlife Service is a unit of the United States Department of the Interior that is dedicated to managing and preserving wildlife. ...

Alaska has more acres of public land owned by the National Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management than any other state.
Alaska has more acres of public land owned by the National Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management than any other state.[10]

Of the remaining land area, the State of Alaska owns 24.5%; another 10% is managed by 13 regional and dozens of local Native corporations created under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Various private interests own the remaining land, totaling less than 1%. The USDA Forest Service, a United States government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture, is under the leadership of the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ... US BLM logo The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior which administers Americas public lands, totaling approximately 261 million surface acres (1,056,229. ... The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act was signed into law on December 18, 1971, and the largest land claims settlement in United States history was concluded. ...

Map of Alaska - PDF
Map of Alaska - PDF

Alaska is administratively divided into "boroughs", as opposed to "counties." The function is the same, but whereas some states use a three-tiered system of decentralization—state/county/township—most of Alaska uses only two tiers—state/borough. Owing to the low population density, most of the land is located in the Unorganized Borough which, as the name implies, has no intermediate borough government of its own, but is administered directly by the state government. Currently (2000 census) 57.71% of Alaska's area has this status, with 13.05% of the population. For statistical purposes the United States Census Bureau divides this territory into census areas. Anchorage merged the city government with the Greater Anchorage Area Borough in 1971 to form the Municipality of Anchorage, containing the city proper and the bedroom communities of Eagle River, Chugiak, Peters Creek, Girdwood, Bird, and Indian. Fairbanks has a separate borough (the Fairbanks North Star Borough) and municipality (the City of Fairbanks). File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... Map of Alaska boroughs and census areas The Unorganized Borough is that part of Alaska not contained in any of its 16 organized boroughs. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A census tract, census area, or census district is a particular community defined for the purpose of taking a census. ... Fairbanks North Star Borough is a borough located in the state of Alaska. ...


Climate

The climate in Juneau and the southeast panhandle is a mid-latitude oceanic climate (Köppen climate classification Cfb) in the southern sections and a subarctic oceanic climate (Köppen Cfc) in the northern parts. On an annual basis, this is both the wettest and warmest part of Alaska with milder temperatures in the winter and high precipitation throughout the year. Juneau averages over 50 inches (1,270 mm) of precipitation a year, while other areas receive over 275 inches (6,990 mm).[11] This is also the only region in Alaska in which the average daytime high temperature is above freezing during the winter months. World map showing the oceanic climate zones. ... Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...


The climate of Anchorage and south central Alaska is mild by Alaskan standards due to the region's proximity to the seacoast. While the area does not get nearly as much rain as southeast Alaska, it does get more snow, although days tend to be clearer. On average, Anchorage receives 16 inches (406 mm) of precipitation a year, with around 75 inches (1,905 mm) of snow, although there are areas in the south central which receive far more snow. It is a subarctic climate (Köppen Dfc) due to its short, cool summers.

Barrow, Alaska is the northernmost city in the United States.
Barrow, Alaska is the northernmost city in the United States.

The climate of Western Alaska is determined in large part by the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska. It is a subarctic oceanic climate in the southwest and a continental subarctic climate farther north. The temperature is somewhat moderate considering how far north the area is. This area has a tremendous amount of variety in precipitation. The northern side of the Seward Peninsula is technically a desert with less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation annually, while some locations between Dillingham and Bethel average around 100 inches (2,540 mm) of precipitation.[11] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 677 KB) View westward over the beach in Barrow (note the bicyclist!). In the middle distance is a traditional Inupiat whaling boat made from seal skins stretched over a wooden frame. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 677 KB) View westward over the beach in Barrow (note the bicyclist!). In the middle distance is a traditional Inupiat whaling boat made from seal skins stretched over a wooden frame. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Sea Bering Sea and the North Pacific Ocean Bearing Sea with Kamchatka Peninsula and Alaska The Bering (or Imarpik) Sea is a body of water north of, and separated from, the north Pacific Ocean by the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. ... The Gulf of Alaska is an arm of the Pacific Ocean defined by the curve of the southern coast of Alaska, stretching from the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Island in the west to the Alexander Archipelago in the east, where Glacier Bay and the Inside Passage are found. ...


The climate of the interior of Alaska is best described as extreme and is a good example of a true subarctic climate. Some of the hottest and coldest temperatures in Alaska occur around the area near Fairbanks. The summers can have temperatures reaching into the 90s°F (the low to mid 30s °C), while in the winter, the temperature can fall below −60 °F (-52 °C). Precipitation is sparse in the Interior, often less than 10 inches (250 mm) a year, but what precipitation falls in the winter tends to stay the entire winter.


The highest and lowest recorded temperatures in Alaska are both in the Interior. The highest is 100 °F (38 °C) in Fort Yukon on June 27, 1915,[12][13] tied with Pahala, Hawaii as the lowest high temperature in the United States.[14][15] The lowest Alaska temperature is −80 °F (-64 °C) in Prospect Creek on January 23, 1971,[12][13] one degree above the lowest temperature recorded in North America (in Snag, Yukon, Canada).[16] Fort Yukon is a city located in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pahala is a census-designated place located in Hawaii County, Hawaii. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... // Main List Here is a list of cities, towns, villages and unincorporated communities in the Yukon Territory, Canada. ...


The climate in the extreme north of Alaska is as expected for an area north of the Arctic Circle. It is an Arctic climate (Köppen ET) with long, very cold winters and short, cool summers. Even in July, the average low temperature is barely above freezing in Barrow, at 34 °F (2 °C).[17] Precipitation is light in this part of Alaska, with many places averaging less than 10 inches (250 mm) per year, mostly in the form of snow which stays on the ground almost the entire year. For the fast food restaurant chain, see Arctic Circle Restaurants. ... Solar radiation has a lower intensity in polar regions because it travels a longer distance through the atmosphere, and is spread across a larger surface area. ...


History

Main article: History of Alaska
Miners and prospectors climb the Chilkoot Trail during the Klondike Gold Rush.
Miners and prospectors climb the Chilkoot Trail during the Klondike Gold Rush.

At the end of the Upper Paleolithic Period (around 12,000 BC), Asiatic groups crossed the Bering Land Bridge into what is now western Alaska. At the time of European contact by the Russian explorers, the area was populated by Alaska Native groups. Alaska history redirects here. ... Image File history File links Miners_climb_Chilkoot. ... Image File history File links Miners_climb_Chilkoot. ... The Chilkoot Trail is a 33 mile (53 kilometer) trail through the Coast Mountains that leads from Dyea, Alaska, to Bennett, British Columbia. ... Routes to the Klondike. ... The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Nautical chart of Bering Strait, site of former land bridge between Asia and North America The Bering land bridge, also known as Beringia, was a land bridge roughly 1,000 miles (1,600 km) north to south at its greatest extent, which joined present-day Alaska and eastern Siberia at... Russian colonization of the Americas proceeded in several places. ... Alaskan Natives are Aboriginal Americans who live in Alaska. ...


The first European contact with Alaska occurred in the year 1741, when Vitus Bering led an expedition for the Russian Navy aboard the St. Peter. After his crew returned to Russia bearing sea otter pelts judged to be the finest fur in the world, small associations of fur traders began to sail from the shores of Siberia towards the Aleutian islands. The first permanent European settlement was founded in 1784, and the Russian-American Company carried out an expanded colonization program during the early to mid-1800s. Despite these efforts, the Russians never fully colonized Alaska, and the colony was never very profitable. William H. Seward, the U.S. Secretary of State, engineered the Alaskan purchase in 1867 for $7.2 million. A portrait attributed to Vitus Bering (according to modern data, his uncles portrait) Vitus Jonassen Bering (also, less correctly, Behring) (August 1681–December 19, 1741) was a Danish-born navigator in the service of the Russian Navy, a captain-komandor known among the Russian sailors as Ivan Ivanovich. ... The second Kamchatka expedition was led by Vitus Jonassen Bering after being chosen by Peter I to lead the first Kamchatka expedition. ... For other uses, see Fur (disambiguation). ... The Russian-American Company was a semi-official colonial trading company started by Grigory Shelikhov and Nikolai Rezanov and chartered by tsar Paul I in 1799. ... This article is about a type of political territory. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Check used to pay for Alaska The Alaska purchase from Russia by the United States occurred in 1867 at the behest of Secretary of State William Seward. ...


In the 1890s, gold rushes in Alaska and the nearby Yukon Territory brought thousands of miners and settlers to Alaska. Alaska was granted territorial status in 1912. For other meanings, see Gold rush (disambiguation) A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... Motto: none Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Whitehorse Largest city Whitehorse Commissioner Jack Cable Premier Dennis Fentie (Yukon Party) Area 482,443 km² (9th)  - Land 474,391 km²  - Water 8,052 km² (1. ...


During World War II, three of the outer Aleutian IslandsAttu, Agattu and Kiska, 460 miles (740 km) away from continental USSR, 920 miles (1,480 km) from continental Alaska (U.S.), 950 miles (1,530 km) from Japan — were invaded by Japanese troops and occupied between June 1942 and August 1943. Their recovery became a matter of national pride. The construction of military bases contributed to the population growth of some Alaskan cities. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... Attu Island Attu is the westernmost and largest island in the Near Islands group of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, making it the westernmost point of land relative to Alaska and the United States. ... The Near Islands are the smallest and westernmost group of the Aleutian Islands in southwestern Alaska, at about 52°51′ N 173°11′ E. The largest of the Near Islands are Attu and Agattu. ... Kiska is an island in the Rat Islands group of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska located at 52. ... A military base is an isolated facility, settlement, or installation that shelters military equipment and personnel. ...


Alaska was granted statehood on January 3, 1959. is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1964, the massive "Good Friday Earthquake" killed 131 people and leveled several villages. Earthquake Damage, Anchorage The Good Friday Earthquake (also called the Great Alaska Earthquake) of Friday, March 27, 1964 (Good Friday, a Christian holy day associated with a historical earthquake[1]), 5:36 P.M. AST (03:36 3/27 UTC) had a magnitude of 9. ...


The 1968 discovery of oil at Prudhoe Bay and the 1977 completion of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline led to an oil boom. In 1989, the Exxon Valdez hit a reef in the Prince William Sound, spilling between 11 and 35 million US gallons (42,000-130,000 m³) of crude oil over 1,100 miles (1,600 km) of coastline. Today, the battle between philosophies of development and conservation is seen in the contentious debate over oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Prudhoe Bay is a census-designated place located in North Slope Borough, Alaska. ... Map of the pipeline The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), usually called the Alyeska Pipeline in Alaska or the Alaska Pipeline elsewhere, is a major U.S. oil pipeline connecting oil fields in northern Alaska to a sea port where the oil can be shipped to the Lower 48 states... This article is about the tank vessel Exxon Valdez. ... Prince William Sound, on the south coast of Alaska. ... The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1950 128,643
1960 226,167 75.8%
1970 300,382 32.8%
1980 401,851 33.8%
1990 550,043 36.9%
2000 626,932 14%
Est. 2007 683,478 9%

In 2006 Alaska had an estimated population of 670,053, an increase of 6,392 (0.96%) from 2005 and 43,121 (6.9%) from 2000. In 2000 Alaska ranked 48th out of 50 states by population.[18] Alaska is the least densely populated state, at 0.42 people per square kilometer (1.1 per square mile), with the next state, Wyoming, at 1.97 (5.1 per square mile), and the most densely populated, New Jersey, at 437.6 people per square kilometer (1,134.4 per square mile). Alaska Population Density Map As of 2005, Alaska has an estimated population of 663,661, which is an increase of 5,906, or 0. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


Race and ancestry

According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 69.3% of single-race Alaska residents were White and 15.6% were Native American or Alaska Native,[19] the largest proportion of any state. Multiracial/Mixed-Race people are the third largest group of people in the state, totaling 6.9% of the population. The largest self-reported ancestry groups in the state are German (16.6%), Alaska Native or American Indian (15.6%), Irish (10.8%), British (9.6%), American (5.7%), and Norwegian (4.2%). The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ...


The vast sparsely populated regions of northern and western Alaska are primarily inhabited by Alaska Natives, who are also numerous in the southeast. Anchorage, Fairbanks, and other parts of south-central and southeast Alaska have many whites of northern and western European ancestry. The Wrangell-Petersburg area has many residents of Scandinavian ancestry and the Aleutians contain a large Filipino population. Most of the state's black population lives in Anchorage, though Fairbanks also has a sizable black population. This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Fairbanks redirects here. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


Languages

Russian Orthodox church in Sitka, Alaska.
Russian Orthodox church in Sitka, Alaska.

According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 85.7% of Alaska residents aged 5 and older speak English at home. The next most common languages are Spanish (2.88%), Yupik (2.87%), Tagalog (1.54%), and Iñupiaq (1.06%).[20] A total of 5.2% of Alaskans speak one of the state's 22 indigenous languages, known locally as Native American languages. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 711 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by KenWalker and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 711 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by KenWalker and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Yupik (Yupik/Юпик) people speak several distinct languages, depending on their location. ... Tagalog (pronounced ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Inupiaq, Iñupiaq, Inupiak or Inupiatun is a group of dialects of the Inuit language spoken in northern and northwestern Alaska. ... Indigenous languages of the Americas (or Amerindian Languages) are spoken by indigenous peoples from the southern tip of South America to Alaska and Greenland, encompassing the land masses which constitute the Americas. ...


Religion

Alaska has been identified, along with Pacific Northwest states Washington and Oregon, as being the least religious in the U.S.[21] According to statistics collected by the Association of Religion Data Archives, only about 39% of Alaska residents were members of religious congregations. Evangelical Protestants had 78,070 members, Roman Catholics had 54,359, and mainline Protestants had 37,156.[22] After Catholics, the largest single denominations are Mormons with 28,956, Southern Baptists with 22,959, and Orthodox with 20,000. The large Eastern Orthodox population is a result of early Russian colonization and missionary work among Alaska Natives.[23] In 1795, the First Russian Orthodox Church was established in Kodiak. Intermarriage with Alaskan Natives helped the Russian immigrants integrate into society. As a result, more and more Russian Orthodox churches[24] gradually became established within Alaska. Alaska also has the largest Quaker population (by percentage) of any state.[25] In 2003 there were 3,000 Jews in Alaska.[26] Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Bering Strait, Alaskas West coast and Russias East coast // The first written accounts indicate that the first Europeans to reach Alaska came from Russia. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Kodiak Island Borough is a borough located in the state of Alaska, United States. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ...


Economy

Alaska State Quarter
The Trans-Alaska Pipeline transports oil, Alaska's most important export, from the North Slope to Valdez
The Trans-Alaska Pipeline transports oil, Alaska's most important export, from the North Slope to Valdez
Alaska ranks 5th nationally in craft breweries per capita.
Alaska ranks 5th nationally in craft breweries per capita.[27]

The 2005 gross state product was $39.9 billion. Its per-capita GSP for 2005 was $60,079, 3rd in the nation. The oil and gas industry dominates the Alaskan economy, with more than 80% of the state's revenues derived from petroleum extraction. Alaska's main export product (excluding oil and natural gas) is seafood, primarily salmon, cod, Pollock and crab. Agriculture represents only a fraction of the Alaskan economy. Agricultural production is primarily for consumption within the state and includes nursery stock, dairy products, vegetables, and livestock. Manufacturing is limited, with most foodstuffs and general goods imported from elsewhere. Employment is primarily in government and industries such as natural resource extraction, shipping, and transportation. Military bases are a significant component of the economy in both Fairbanks and Anchorage. Its industrial outputs are crude petroleum, natural gas, coal, gold, precious metals, zinc and other mining, seafood processing, timber and wood products. There is also a growing service and tourism sector. Tourists have contributed to the economy by supporting local lodging. Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 2390 KB) Summary Picture of the Alaska Pipeline underside. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 2390 KB) Summary Picture of the Alaska Pipeline underside. ... Map of the pipeline The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), usually called the Alyeska Pipeline in Alaska or the Alaska Pipeline elsewhere, is a major U.S. oil pipeline connecting oil fields in northern Alaska to a sea port where the oil can be shipped to the Lower 48 states... Landsat 7 false-color image of the North Slope. ... Valdez (IPA: ) is a city in Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Beer barrels outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England. ... Gross state product is a measurment of the economic output of a U.S. state or an Australian state. ... This article presents a list of U.S. states sorted by their gross state product (GSP) per capita. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


Energy

Alaska has vast energy resources. Major oil and gas reserves are found in the Alaska North Slope (ANS) and Cook Inlet basins. According to the Energy Information Administration, Alaska ranks second in the Nation in crude oil production. Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope is the highest yielding oil field in the United States typically producing about 400,000 barrels per day (64,000 m³/d). The Trans-Alaska Pipeline can pump up to 2.1 million barrels (3.3×105 m³) of crude oil per day, more than any other crude oil pipeline in the United States. Additionally, substantial coal deposits are found in Alaska’s bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coal basins. Alaska also offers some of the highest hydroelectric power potential in the country from its numerous rivers. Large swaths of the Alaskan coastline offer wind and geothermal energy potential as well.[28] The Energy Information Administration (EIA), as part of the U.S. Department of Energy, collects and disseminates data on energy reserves, production, consumption, distribution, prices, technology, and related international, economic, and financial matters. ... Map of the pipeline The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), usually called the Alyeska Pipeline in Alaska or the Alaska Pipeline elsewhere, is a major U.S. oil pipeline connecting oil fields in northern Alaska to a sea port where the oil can be shipped to the Lower 48 states...


Alaska's economy depends heavily on increasingly expensive diesel fuel for heating, transportation, electric power and light. Though wind and hydroelectric power are abundant and underutilized, proposals for state-wide energy systems (e.g. with special low-cost electric interties) were judged uneconomical (at the time of the report, 2001) due to low (<$0.50/Gal) fuel prices, long distances and low population.[29] The cost of a gallon of gas in urban Alaska today is usually $0.30-$0.60 higher than the national average; prices in rural areas are generally significantly higher but vary widely depending on transportation costs, seasonal usage peaks, nearby petroleum development infrastructure and many other factors. Diesel or diesel fuel (IPA: ) in general is any fuel used in diesel engines. ... A furnace is a device for heating air or any other fluid. ... For the movement of people or objects, see transport. ... For delivered electrical power, see Electrical power industry. ... An example of a wind turbine. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ...


Permanent Fund

The Alaska Permanent Fund is a legislatively controlled appropriation established in 1976 to manage a surplus in state petroleum revenues from the recently constructed Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. From its initial principal of $734,000, the fund has grown to $38 billion as a result of oil royalties and capital investment programs.[30] Starting in 1982, dividends from the fund's annual growth have been paid out each year to eligible Alaskans, ranging from $331.29 in 1984 to $1963.86 in 2000.[31] The Alaska Permanent Fund was established by a constitutional amendment in 1976 to invest proceeds from the sale of minerals, especially oil through the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, for the benefit of current and future Alaskans. ... Map of the pipeline The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), usually called the Alyeska Pipeline in Alaska or the Alaska Pipeline elsewhere, is a major U.S. oil pipeline connecting oil fields in northern Alaska to a sea port where the oil can be shipped to the Lower 48 states...


Cost of living

The cost of goods in Alaska has long been higher than in the contiguous 48 states. This has changed for the most part in Anchorage and to a lesser extent in Fairbanks, where the cost of living has dropped somewhat in the past five years. Federal Government employees, particularly United States Postal Service (USPS) workers and active-duty military members, receive a Cost Of Living Allowance usually set at 25% of base pay because, while the cost of living has gone down, it is still one of the highest in the country. This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Fairbanks redirects here. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ...


The introduction of big-box stores in Anchorage, Fairbanks (Wal-Mart in March of 2004), and Juneau also did much to lower prices. However, rural Alaska suffers from extremely high prices for food and consumer goods, compared to the rest of the country due to the relatively limited transportation infrastructure. Many rural residents come into these cities and purchase food and goods in bulk from warehouse clubs like Costco and Sam's Club. Some have embraced the free shipping offers of some online retailers to purchase items much more cheaply than they could in their own communities, if they are available at all. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Costco Wholesale Corporation (NASDAQ: COST) is the largest membership warehouse club chain in the world based on sales volume, headquartered in Issaquah, Washington, United States,[1] with its flagship warehouse in nearby Seattle. ... Sams Club is a membership-only warehouse club owned and operated by Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ...


Taxes

Alaska has the lowest individual tax burden in the United States,[32] and is one of only five states with no state sales tax and one of seven states that do not levy an individual income tax. To finance state government operations, Alaska depends primarily on petroleum revenues. The Department of Revenue Tax Division reports regularly on the state's revenue sources. The Department also issues an annual overview of its operations, including new state laws that directly affect the tax division. A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Petro redirects here. ...


While Alaska has no state sales tax, 89 municipalities collect a local sales tax, from 1% to 7.5%, typically 3% to 5%. Other local taxes levied include raw fish taxes, hotel, motel, and B&B “bed” taxes, severance taxes, liquor and tobacco taxes, gaming (pull tabs) taxes, tire taxes and fuel transfer taxes. A percentage of revenue collected from certain state taxes and license fees (such as petroleum, aviation motor fuel, telephone cooperative) is shared with municipalities in Alaska. This article is about lodging. ... Tourists of various nationalities chatting over breakfast at a B&B in Quebec City. ... Spirits redirects here. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ...


Property taxes are relatively low, with only 25 of 161 incorporated municipalities or boroughs in the state assessing property taxes.[citation needed] Fairbanks has one of the highest property taxes in the state as no sales or income taxes are assessed in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB). A sales tax for the FNSB has been voted on many times, but has yet to be approved, leading law makers to increase taxes dramatically on other goods such as liquor and tobacco. The average per capita property tax paid in all municipalities, excluding oil and gas properties, was US$999 (2003 data).[citation needed] Fairbanks redirects here. ... Fairbanks North Star Borough is a borough located in the state of Alaska. ...


In 2008 the Tax Foundation ranked Alaska as having the 4th most "business friendly" tax policy. Superior states were Wyoming, Nevada, and South Dakota. The Tax Foundation logo The Tax Foundation is a Washington-D.C.-based tax research organization founded in 1937. ...


Transportation

Roads

See also: List of Alaska Routes
See also: Transportation in Alaska

Alaska has few road connections compared to the rest of the U.S. The state's road system covers a relatively small area of the state, linking the central population centers and the Alaska Highway, the principal route out of the state through Canada. The state capital, Juneau, is not accessible by road, only a car ferry, which has spurred several debates over the decades about moving the capital to a city on the road system, or building a road connection from Haines. The western part of Alaska has no road system connecting the communities with the rest of Alaska. One unique feature of the road system is the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel which links the Seward Highway south of Anchorage with the relatively isolated community of Whittier. At nearly 2.5 miles (4.0 km) the tunnel was the longest road tunnel in North America until completion of the 3.5 mile (5.6 km) Interstate 93 tunnel as part of the "Big Dig" project in Boston, Massachusetts. The tunnel is the longest combination road and rail tunnel in North America. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Sterling Highway is a 142-mile (229-km) highway in the Southcentral region of the U.S. state of Alaska, leading from the Seward Highway at Tern Lake Junction, 90 miles (145 km) south of Anchorage, to Homer. ... Alaska Routes are both numbered and named. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Map of Alaska Highway (in red) The Alaska Highway, also the Alaskan Highway, Alaska-Canadian Highway, and the Alcan Highway, runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia to Fairbanks, Alaska, via Whitehorse, Yukon. ... Juneau redirects here. ... Haines is a city located in Haines Borough, Alaska, United States. ... Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel, Portage Glacier Entrance The Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel is a tunnel through Maynard Mountain near Whittier, Alaska and part of the Portage Glacier Highway. ... The Seward Highway is a highway and All-American Road on the Kenai Peninsula in south central Alaska. ... Whittier is a small city located in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of Alaska. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 93 Interstate 93 (abbreviated I-93) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... For other projects of the same name, see Big Dig. ... Boston redirects here. ... Road-rail tunnels are tunnels shared by road and rail lines, as an economy measure compared to constructing tunnels. ...


Rail

The Alaska Railroad runs from Seward through Anchorage, Denali, and Fairbanks to North Pole, with spurs to Whittier and Palmer (locally known as "The Railbelt"). The railroad is famous for its summertime passenger services and also plays a vital part in moving Alaska's natural resources, such as coal and gravel, to ports in Anchorage, Whittier, and Seward. The Alaska Railroad was one of the last railroads in North America to use cabooses in regular service and still uses them on certain gravel trains, and it offers one of the last flag stop routes in the country. A stretch of about 60 miles (97 km) of track along an area inaccessible by road is the only transportation to cabins in the area. The Alaska Railroad (AAR reporting marks ARR) is a Class II railroad that extends from Seward, in the south of the state of Alaska, in the United States, to Fairbanks, in the interior of that state. ... The Seward boat harbor Seward is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Denali redirects here. ... Fairbanks redirects here. ... North Pole is a city located in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska. ... Whittier is a small city located in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of Alaska. ... Palmer depot with a narrow gauge locomotive. ... Look up Caboose in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In rail transport, a request stop is a train station where trains stop only if passengers wish to board the train or leave it. ...


Marine transport

Most cities and villages in the state are accessible only by sea or air. Alaska has a well-developed ferry system, known as the Alaska Marine Highway, which serves the cities of Southeast and the Alaska Peninsula. The system also operates a ferry service from Bellingham, Washington via the Inside Passage to Skagway. The Inter-Island Ferry Authority also serves as an important marine link for many communities in the Prince of Wales Island region of Southeast and works in concert with the Alaska Marine Highway. Tourist sea travel is also popular on Alaska cruises. The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... The Alaska Marine Highway or the Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS) is a ferry service that is operated by the government of the state of Alaska in the United States. ... The Alaska Panhandle is the coast of the American state of Alaska, just west of the northern half of the Canadian province of British Columbia. ... Volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula The Alaska Peninsula is a peninsula extending about 800 km (500 miles) to the southwest from the mainland of Alaska and ending in the Aleutian Islands. ... Bellingham, Washington is the county seat of Whatcom County in the U.S. state of Washington. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Part of the Inside Passage. ... Broadway Avenue, Skagway, May 2007. ... The Inter-Island Ferry Authority (IFA) is a ferry service in the U.S. State of Alaska with its headquarters based in Craig on Prince of Wales Island. ... . For other islands named after the Prince of Wales, see Prince of Wales Island Prince of Wales Island is the third largest island of the USA, after Hawai‘i and Kodiak Island. ...


Air transport

Cities not served by road or sea can be reached only by air, accounting for Alaska's extremely well-developed Bush air services—an Alaskan novelty. Anchorage itself, and to a lesser extent Fairbanks, are serviced by many major airlines. Air travel is the cheapest and most efficient form of transportation in and out of the state. Anchorage recently completed extensive remodeling and construction at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport to help accommodate the upsurge in tourism (in 2000-2001, the latest year for which data is available, 2.4 million total arrivals to Alaska were counted, 1.7 million via air travel; 1.4 million were visitors[33][34]). Image File history File linksMetadata 7377SEA618AS_01. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 7377SEA618AS_01. ... Alaska Airlines, (NYSE: ALK) is an airline based in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... The Bush is a cultural as well as geographic division of the state of Alaska in the United States. ... Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (IATA: ANC, ICAO: PANC, FAA LID: ANC)[2] is the major airport in the United States state of Alaska located 4 miles (6 km) southwest of downtown Anchorage. ... Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (IATA: ANC, ICAO: PANC, FAA LID: ANC)[2] is the major airport in the United States state of Alaska located 4 miles (6 km) southwest of downtown Anchorage. ...


Regular flights to most villages and towns within the state are commercially challenging to provide. Alaska Airlines is the only major airline offering in-state travel with jet service (sometimes in combination cargo and passenger Boeing 737-400s) from Anchorage and Fairbanks to regional hubs like Bethel, Nome, Kotzebue, Dillingham, Kodiak, and other larger communities as well as to major Southeast and Alaska Peninsula communities. The bulk of remaining commercial flight offerings come from small regional commuter airlines such as Era Aviation, PenAir, and Frontier Flying Service. The smallest towns and villages must rely on scheduled or chartered Bush flying services using general aviation aircraft such as the Cessna Caravan, the most popular aircraft in use in the state. Much of this service can be attributed to the Alaska bypass mail program which subsidizes bulk mail delivery to Alaskan rural communities. The program requires 70% of that subsidy to go to carriers who offer passenger service to the communities. Perhaps the most quintessentially Alaskan plane is the Bush seaplane. The world's busiest seaplane base is Lake Hood, located next to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, where flights bound for remote villages without an airstrip carry passengers, cargo, and lots of items from stores and warehouse clubs. Alaska has the highest number of pilots per capita of any U.S. state: out of the estimated 663,661 residents, 8,550 are pilots, or about one in 78.[35] Alaska Airlines, (NYSE: ALK) is an airline based in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... Bethel (Mamterilleq in Central Alaskan Yupik) is a city located in Bethel Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, 340 miles (540 km) west of Anchorage. ... Aerial view of the harbor in Nome Nome is a city located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast of Norton Sound in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Kotzebue is a city located in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska. ... Dillingham is a city located in Dillingham Census Area, Alaska. ... View of Kodiak from Pillar Mountain Street of Kodiak in 1965 Kodiak is a city on Kodiak Island in Kodiak Island Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Era Aviation (IATA: 7H, ICAO: ERH, and Callsign: Era) [1] is an airline based in Anchorage, Alaska, USA. It operates a network of services from Anchorage as part of Alaska Airlines Commuter service. ... Peninsula Airways, usually called PenAir, (IATA: KS, ICAO: PEN, and Callsign: Peninsula) is an airline based in Anchorage, Alaska, USA. Founded in 1955 by pilot Orin Seybert of Pilot Point, it is Alaskas largest commuter airline, operating both passenger and cargo service, primarily in the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian... Frontier Flying Service is an airline based in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA. It operates an extensive network of year-round scheduled commuter services and postal services to Alaska bush communities, primarily north of Fairbanks, as well as charter services to the lower 48 and Canada. ... The Cessna 208 Caravan is a single turboprop short-haul regional airliner and utility aircraft built in the USA by Cessna. ... The United States Postal Service defines bulk mail broadly as quantities of mail prepared for mailing at reduced postage rates. ... Lake Hood Seaplane Base is an aircraft and seaplane base in Anchorage, Alaska. ...


Other transport

Another Alaskan transportation method is the dogsled. In modern times, dog mushing is more of a sport than a true means of transportation. Various races are held around the state, but the best known is the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, a 1150-mile (1850 km) trail from Anchorage to Nome (although the milage varies from year to year, the official distance is set at 1049 miles). The race commerates the famous 1925 serum run to Nome in which mushers and dogs like Togo and Balto took much-needed medicine to the diphtheria-stricken community of Nome when all other means of transportation had failed. Mushers from all over the world come to Anchorage each March to compete for cash, prizes, and prestige. The "Serum Run" is another sled dog race that more accurately follows the route of the famous 1925 relay, leaving from the community of Nennana (southwest of Fairbanks) to Nome.[36] Dog sled A dog sled (or dogsled) is a sled pulled by one or more dogs used to travel over ice and through snow. ... A team of six white, husky-type dogs Mushing also means playing on a MUSH. Mushing also can be used to describe the kneading behavior of domestic cats when they are content or are preparing to settle for a nap. ... Aliy Zirkles dog team on Anchorages Fourth Avenue at the start of the 2003 Iditarod. ... During the 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy, 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs relayed diphtheria antitoxin 674 miles (1,085 km) by dog sled across the U.S. territory of Alaska in a record-breaking five and a half days, saving... For the 1995 animated film, see Balto (film). ... Aerial view of the harbor in Nome Nome is a city located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast of Norton Sound in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


In areas not served by road or rail, primary transportation in summer is by all-terrain vehicle and in winter by snowmobile or "snow machine," as it is commonly referred to in Alaska. The ATV is commonly called a quad (quad-bike) in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. ... A snowmobile tour at Yellowstone National Park. ...


Law and government

Main article: Government of Alaska

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Political leanings

Alaska is often described as a Republican-leaning state with strong Libertarian tendencies. In presidential elections, the state's electoral college votes have been almost always won by a Republican nominee. Only once has Alaska supported a Democratic nominee, when it supported Lyndon B. Johnson in the landslide year of 1964, although the 1960 and 1968 elections were close. No state has voted for a Democratic presidential candidate fewer times. President George W. Bush won the state's electoral votes in 2004 by a margin of 25 percentage points with 61.1% of the vote. The city of Juneau and Midtown Anchorage are strongholds of the Democratic party. Matanuska-Susitna Borough and South Anchorage typically have the strongest Republican showing. As of 2004, well over half of all registered voters choose "Non-Partisan" or "Undeclared" as their affiliation,[37] despite recent attempts to close primaries. Alaska is one of the states with a more relaxed marijuana policy, where one can possess up to one ounce of the substance legally [38]. Alaska possesses a pervasively strong independence movement favoring secession from the US, with the Alaskan Independence Party labeled one of the "the most significant state-level third parties operating in the 20th century".[39] GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the political philosophy based on private property rights. ... This article is about Electoral Colleges in general. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... LBJ redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Presidential election results map. ... The Alaskan Independence Party is a political party in the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


State government

December 4, 2006, Sarah Palin was sworn in as the first woman and youngest Governor of Alaska. Her running mate was Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell. Palin is the former two-term mayor of Wasilla, Alaska. is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sarah Heath Palin (née Sarah Louise Heath, born February 11, 1964 in Sandpoint, Idaho) is the current Governor of Alaska. ... Sean R. Parnell (November 19, 1962 in Hanford, California) is the current Lieutenant Governor of Alaska, United States, taking office in 2006 alongside governor Sarah Palin. ... For the Sarmatian god of the same name, see Wasilla (god) Wasilla is a town in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


The Alaska State Legislature consists of a 20-member Senate, whose members serve four-year terms, and 40-member House of Representatives, who serve two-year terms. It has been dominated by conservatives, generally Republicans. Recent state governors have been mostly conservatives, although not always elected under the official Republican banner. Republican Wally Hickel was elected to the office for a second term in 1990 after jumping the Republican ship and briefly joining the Alaskan Independence Party ticket just long enough to be reelected. He subsequently officially rejoined the Republican fold in 1994. The Alaska Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Walter Joseph Wally Hickel (born August 18, 1919) is an American Republican politician who was Governor of Alaska from 1966 to 1969, and again from 1990 to 1994. ... The Alaskan Independence Party is a political party in the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


Alaska's court system has four levels: the Alaska Supreme Court, the court of appeals, the superior courts and the district courts.[40] The superior and district courts are trial courts. Superior courts are courts of general jurisdiction, while district courts only hear certain types of cases, including misdemeanor criminal cases and civil cases valued up to $100,000.[40] The supreme court and the court of appeals are appellate courts. The court of appeals is required to hear appeals from certain lower-court decisions, including those regarding criminal prosecutions, juvenile delinquency, and habeas corpus.[40] The supreme court hears civil appeals and may in its discretion hear criminal appeals.[40] The Alaska Supreme Court is the state supreme court in the State of Alaskas judicial department (Alaska Court System). ... A trial court or court of first instance is the court in which most civil or criminal cases begin. ... Court of Appeal, Court of Appeals, and Appellate Division redirect here; for a list of specific courts using those titles, see Court of Appeal (disambiguation), Court of Appeals (disambiguation), and Appellate Division (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Habeas corpus (disambiguation). ...


Local political communities often work on issues related to land use development, fishing, tourism, and individual rights. Alaska Natives, while organized in and around their communities, are often active within the Native corporations which have been given ownership over large tracts of land, and thus need to deliberate resource conservation and development issues. For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Individual rights represent the moral rights of individuals in society prior to government. ... Alaskan Natives are Aboriginal Americans who live in Alaska. ... The Alaska Native Regional Corporations (Alaska Native Corporations or ANCSA Corporations) were established in 1971 when the United States Congress passed the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) which settled land and financial claims made by the Alaska Natives and provided for the establishment of 13 regional corporations to administer...


Representation in the U.S. Congress

U.S. Senator Ted Stevens
U.S. Senator Ted Stevens

Alaska's members of the U.S. Congress are all Republican. U.S. Senator Ted Stevens was appointed to the position following the death of U.S. Senator Bob Bartlett in December 1968, and has not lost a re-election campaign since. As the longest-serving Republican in the Senate (sometimes nicknamed "Senator-For-Life" and often referred to as "Uncle Ted"), Stevens has been a crucial force in gaining federal money for his state. Ted Stevens, from senate. ... Ted Stevens, from senate. ... This article is about the senator. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... This article is about the senator. ... Bronze by Felix W. de Weldon. ...


Until his resignation from the U.S. Senate after being elected governor in 2002, Republican Frank Murkowski held the state's other senatorial position and, as governor, appointed his daughter, State Representative Lisa Murkowski as his successor (under public pressure, the State legislature attempted to amend state statute to limit the length of gubernatorial appointments in the future in response to a ballot initiative sponsored by Murkowski's political opponents.). She won a full six-year term on her own in 2004. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Francis Hughes Murkowski (born March 28, 1933) is an American politician and a member of the Republican Party. ... Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ...


Alaska's sole U.S. Representative, Don Young, was re-elected to his 17th consecutive term, also in 2004. His seniority in House makes him one of the most influential Republican House members. The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Donald Edwin (Don) Young (born June 9, 1933) has been the sole congressman from Alaska in the United States House of Representatives since 1973. ...


Important cities and towns

See also: List of cities in Alaska by population and Alaska locations by per capita income

Alaska's most populous city is Anchorage, home to 260,283 people in 2000, 225,744 of whom live in the urbanized area. The richest location in Alaska by per capita income is Halibut Cove ($89,895). Sitka, Juneau, and Anchorage are the three largest cities in the U.S. by area. This is a list of incorporated cities in the U.S. state of Alaska, including unified city-boroughs, ordered by 2005 population estimate. ... Alaska is the fourteenth richest state in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $22,660 (2000) and a personal per capita income of $33,568 (2003). ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Alaska is the fourteenth richest state in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $22,660 (2000) and a personal per capita income of $33,568 (2003). ... Halibut Cove is a census-designated place located in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska. ... This is a list of U.S. cities by area. ...


Also notable is the rapid growth of towns in the Mat-Su Valley. Wasilla and Palmer are projected to experience a huge population growth between 2000 and 2010.[citation needed] Matanuska-Susitna Valley shown shaded in red north of Anchorage Matanuska-Susitna Valley (known locally as the Mat-Su Valley) is an area in south central Alaska south of the Alaska Range north and northeast of Anchorage. ... For the Sarmatian god of the same name, see Wasilla (god) Wasilla is a town in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Palmer depot with a narrow gauge locomotive. ...

Anchorage is the largest city in Alaska.
Anchorage is the largest city in Alaska.
Cities of 100,000 or more people
Towns of 10,000-100,000 people
Towns of 1,000-10,000 people
   
Smaller towns

Alaska has many smaller towns, especially in the Alaska Bush, the portion of the state that is inaccessible by road. Image File history File links Anchorage1. ... Image File history File links Anchorage1. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Fairbanks redirects here. ... Juneau redirects here. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Ketchikan (IPA: ) is the fifth most populous city in the U.S. state of Alaska and the southeasternnmost sizable city in that state. ... Sitka redirects here. ... For the Sarmatian god of the same name, see Wasilla (god) Wasilla is a town in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Kenai is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... View of Kodiak from Pillar Mountain Street of Kodiak in 1965 Kodiak is a city on Kodiak Island in Kodiak Island Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Palmer depot with a narrow gauge locomotive. ... Bethel (Mamterilleq in Central Alaskan Yupik) is a city located in Bethel Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, 340 miles (540 km) west of Anchorage. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Aerial view of Unalaska The Russian Orthodox Church in Unalaska Unalaska is a small city on Unalaska Island and neighboring Amaknak Island in the Aleutian Islands, off the coast of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Valdez (IPA: ) is a city in Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Soldotna is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. ... Homer is a town located in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Aerial view of the harbor in Nome Nome is a city located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast of Norton Sound in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Petersburg is a city in Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, Alaska, in the United States. ... Kotzebue is a city located in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska. ... The Seward boat harbor Seward is a city in Kenai Peninsula Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Dillingham is a city located in Dillingham Census Area, Alaska. ... Cordova is a small city located near the mouth of the Copper River in Alaska, at the head of Orca Inlet on the east side of Prince William Sound. ... Totem poles at the Shakes house Wrangell is a city in Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, Alaska, United States. ... North Pole is a city located in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska. ... Hooper Bay or Naparyaarmiut is a city located in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska. ... Craig is a city located in Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Census Area, Alaska. ... Houston is a city located in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...

Education

The Alaska Department of Education and Early Development administers many school districts in Alaska. In addition, the state operates several boarding schools, including Mt. Edgecumbe High School in Sitka, Nenana Student Living Center in Nenana, and Galena High School in Galena.[41] This is a list of school districts in Alaska: Alaska Gateway School District Aleutian Region School District Aleutians East Borough School District Anchorage School District Annette Island School District Bering Strait School District Bristol Bay Borough School District Chatham School District Chugach School District Copper River School District Cordova School... Mt. ... Sitka redirects here. ... The Nenana Student Living Center is a boarding home for students from all over Alaska located in Nenana, Alaska. ... Nenana (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Home Rule City in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Galena is a city located in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska. ...


There are more than a dozen colleges and universities in Alaska. Accredited universities in Alaska include the University of Alaska Anchorage, University of Alaska Fairbanks, University of Alaska Southeast, Sheldon Jackson College and Alaska Pacific University.[42] 43% of the population attends or attended college.[citation needed] This is a list of colleges and universities in Alaska. ... University of Alaska Anchorage is the largest member of the University of Alaska System, with more than 17,000 students, 14,000 of whom attend classes at the main Anchorage campus. ... The University of Alaska Fairbanks, located in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, is the second largest campus of the University of Alaska System, and is abbreviated as UAF. UAF is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, as well as participating in the sun-grant program through Oregon State University. ... The University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) is a regional university in the University of Alaska System. ... Sheldon Jackson College (SJC) is a small private college located on Baranof Island in Sitka, Alaska, United States. ... Alaska Pacific University or APU is a small liberal arts college located in Anchorage, Alaska, that emphasizes experiential learning. ...


Current issues

Alaska has long had a problem with alcohol use and abuse. Many rural communities in Alaska have outlawed its import. This problem directly relates to Alaska's high rate of Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) as well as contributing to the high rate of suicides. This is a controversial topic for many residents. Fetal alcohol syndrome or FAS is a disorder of permanent birth defects that occurs in the offspring of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy. ...


Alaska has also had a problem with "brain drain" as many of its young people, including most of the highest academic achievers, leave the state upon graduating high school. While for many this functions as a sort of walkabout, many do not return to the state. The University of Alaska has been successfully combating this by offering partial four-year scholarships to the top 10% of Alaska high school graduates, via the Alaska Scholars Program[43]. This article is about the emigration term. ... // Walkabout is an English language expression with several meanings: Walkabout is an Australian pidgin (or perhaps quasi-pidgin) term referring to the belief that Australian Aborigines go walkabout at the age of thirteen in the wilderness for six months as a rite of passage. ... The University of Alaska is a Land-Grant, Sea-Grant, and Space Grant university founded in 1922 in Fairbanks, Alaska. ...


Domestic abuse and other violent crimes are also at notoriously high levels in the state; this is in part linked to alcohol abuse. Abuse is a general term for the misuse of a person or thing, causing harm to the person or thing, to the abuser, or to someone else. ...


Culture

See also List of artists and writers from Alaska

Some of Alaska's popular annual events are the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race that starts in Anchorage and ends in Nome, World Ice Art Championships in Fairbanks, the Alaska Hummingbird Festival in Ketchikan, the Sitka Whale Fest, and the Stikine River Garnet Fest in Wrangell. The Stikine River features the largest springtime concentration of American Bald Eagles in the world. This list indexes notable artists and writers from Alaska. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Aliy Zirkles dog team on Anchorages Fourth Avenue at the start of the 2003 Iditarod. ... This article is about the city in the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Aerial view of the harbor in Nome Nome is a city located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast of Norton Sound in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Fairbanks redirects here. ... Ketchikan (IPA: ) is the fifth most populous city in the U.S. state of Alaska and the southeasternnmost sizable city in that state. ... The Sitka Whale Fest logo. ... Totem poles at the Shakes house Wrangell is a city in Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, Alaska, United States. ... Location map of the Stikine River The Stikine River (sti-KEEN) is a river, approximately 335 mi (539 km) long, in northwestern British Columbia in Canada and southeastern Alaska in the United States. ...


The Alaska Native Heritage Center celebrates the rich heritage of Alaska's 11 cultural groups. Their purpose is to enhance self-esteem among Native people and to encourage cross-cultural exchanges among all people. The Alaska Native Arts Foundation promotes and markets Native art from all regions and cultures in the State, both on the internet; at its gallery in Anchorage, 500 West Sixth Avenue, and at the Alaska House New York, 109 Mercer Street in SoHo.[44] The Alaska Native Heritage Center is a educational and cultural institution for all Alaskans, located in Anchorage, Alaska. ...


Libraries

The four main libraries in the state are the Alaska State Library in Juneau, the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library in Fairbanks, the Z. J. Loussac Library in Anchorage, and the UAA/APU Consortium Library, also in Anchorage. Alaska is one of three states (the others are Delaware and Rhode Island) that does not have a Carnegie library. The Alaska State Library and Historical Collections is located in Juneau, Alaska, with an office in Anchorage featuring the Talking Book Center. ... The Elmer E. Rasmuson Library is the largest library in Alaska, housing more than 1. ... The UAA/APU Consortium Library is a joint library serving the University of Alaska Anchorage and Alaska Pacific University, established in 1973. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ...


Food

Due to the northern climate and steep terrain, relatively little farming occurs in Alaska. Most farms are in either the Mat-Su Valley near Anchorage, or on the Kenai Peninsula. The short summer limits the types of crops that can be grown - primary crops are potatoes, carrots, lettuce, and cabbage. Despite this, the long summer days can allow these vegetables to reach record size. Alaska has an abundance of seafood, with the primary fisheries in the Bering Sea, and seafood is one of the few food items that is often cheaper within the state than outside it. Hunting for subsistence, primarily caribou, moose, and sheep is still fairly common in the state, particularly in remote Bush communities. An example of a traditional native food is Akutaq, the Eskimo ice cream, which can consist of reindeer fat, seal oil, dried fish meat and local berries. Matanuska-Susitna Valley shown shaded in red north of Anchorage Matanuska-Susitna Valley (known locally as the Mat-Su Valley) is an area in south central Alaska south of the Alaska Range north and northeast of Anchorage. ... Note: an anchorage is a place where a ship lays anchor. ... The Kenai Peninsula in Alaska The Kenai Peninsula is a large peninsula jutting from the southern coast of Alaska in the United States. ... Satellite photo of the Bering Sea Bering Sea and the North Pacific Ocean Bearing Sea with Kamchatka Peninsula and Alaska The Bering (or Imarpik) Sea is a body of water north of, and separated from, the north Pacific Ocean by the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands. ... Binomial name Rangifer tarandus The reindeer, known as caribou in North America, is an Arctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Nelson, 1884 The Dall Sheep (originally Dalls Sheep, sometimes called Thinhorn Sheep), Ovis dalli, is a wild sheep of the mountainous regions of northwest North America, ranging from white to slate brown and having curved yellowish brown horns. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Akutaq (ah-GOO-duck), also known as Eskimo ice cream, is a delicacy cherished in rural Alaska, meant to sustain, nourish, and energize[1], consisting of whipped fat mixed with berries, with optional additions such as fish and sugar. ...


Most food in Alaska is transported into the state from outside, and is relatively expensive due to high shipping costs.


Music

Main article: Music of Alaska

Influences on music in Alaska include the traditional music of Alaska Natives as well as folk music brought by later immigrants from Russia and Europe. Prominent musicians from Alaska include singer Jewel, traditional Aleut flautist Mary Youngblood, folk singer-songwriter Libby Roderick, and the group Pamyua. Alaska is a state of the United States. ... Alaska Natives are indigenous peoples of the Americas native to the state of Alaska within the United States. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Jewel on the cover of her 2003 album 0304 Jewel Kilcher (born May 23, 1974) is a singer-songwriter better known by her stage name, Jewel. ... For other uses, see Flute (disambiguation). ... Mary Youngblood is a Native American flutist in Northern California. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Libby Roderick is an American singer/songwriter, poet, activist, and teacher. ... Pamyua on the cover of Caught in the Act (2003) Pamyua (IPA: ) is a Yupik musical group from Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska. ...


There are many established music festivals in Alaska, including the Alaska Folk Festival, the Fairbanks Summer Arts Festival the Anchorage Folk Festival, the Athabascan Old-Time Fiddling Festival, the Sitka Jazz Festival, and the Sitka Summer Music Festival. The most prominent symphony in Alaska is the Anchorage Symphony Orchestra, though the Fairbanks Symphony Orchestra and Juneau Symphony are also notable. The Anchorage Opera is currently the state's only professional opera company, though there are several volunteer and semi-professional organizations in the state as well. The Alaska Folk Festival is an annual celebration of folk music from Alaska, the Northwestern United States, and Canada, held in Juneau, Alaska. ... The Sitka Summer Music Festival is a month-long classical chamber music festival in the community of Sitka, Alaska. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Anchorage Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is a semi-professional symphony orchestra located in Anchorage, Alaska. ... The Juneau Symphony is a semi-professional symphony orchestra located in Juneau, Alaska. ...


The official state song of Alaska is "Alaska's Flag", which was adopted in 1955; it celebrates the flag of Alaska. Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Alaskas Flag is the state song of Alaska. ... The flag of Alaska The flag of Alaska consists of eight gold stars, forming the Big Dipper and the North Star, on a dark blue field. ...


Movies filmed in Alaska

Two of the most prominent movies filmed in Alaska were Into the Wild and MGM's Academy Award winning classic Eskimo/Mala The Magnificent starring Alaska's own Ray Mala. In 1932 an expedition set out from MGM's studios in Hollywood to Alaska to film what was then billed as "The Biggest Picture Ever Made". Upon arriving in Alaska, they set up "Camp Hollywood" in Northwest Alaska where they lived during the duration of the filming. Louis B. Mayer spared no expense in making sure they had everything they needed during their stay -- he even sent the famous chef from the Hotel Roosevelt on Hollywood Blvd (the site of the first Oscars) with them to Alaska to cook for them. When Eskimo premiered at the famed Astor Theatre in Times Square, New York, the studio received the largest amount of feedback in the history of the studio up to that time. Eskimo was critically acclaimed and released worldwide; as a result Inupiat Eskimo actor Ray Mala became an international movie star. Eskimo is significant for the following: winning the very first Oscar for Best Film Editing at the Academy Awards, for forever preserving Inupiat culture on film, and for being the first motion picture to be filmed in an all native language (Inupiat). Into the Wild is a 2007 film based on the 1996 non-fiction book of the same name by Jon Krakauer about the adventures of Christopher McCandless. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Eskimo (also known as Mala the Magnificent) (1933) is one of the most prominent movies filmed in Alaska. ... Ray Mala (1906-1952) is the First Native American Movie Star and is the most prolific film star that the State of Alaska has thus far produced. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Astor Theatre was a New York City Broadway theatre from 1906 to 1925 in the United States of America. ... The Inupiat or Iñupiaq are the Inuit people of Alaskas Northwest Arctic and North Slope boroughs and the Bering Straits region. ... For other uses, see Eskimo (disambiguation). ... Ray Mala (1906-1952) is the First Native American Movie Star and is the most prolific film star that the State of Alaska has thus far produced. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Inupiat or Iñupiaq are the Inuit people of Alaskas Northwest Arctic and North Slope boroughs and the Bering Straits region. ... The Inupiat or Iñupiaq are the Inuit people of Alaskas Northwest Arctic and North Slope boroughs and the Bering Straits region. ...


The psychological thriller, Insomnia, starring Al Pacino and Robin Williams was extensively shot in Canada, but was set in Alaska. The 2007 horror feature 30 Days of Night, is set in Barrow, Alaska but was filmed in New Zealand. Most films and television shows set in Alaska are not filmed there, including Northern Exposure. This article is about the American remake. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an Academy, Golden Globe, Tony, BAFTA, Emmy, and SAG award winning American actor who is best known for playing the roles of Tony Montana in the 1983 film Scarface and Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy . ... This article is about the American actor and comedian; for other people named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... 30 Days of Night is a 2007 horror film based on the comic book miniseries of the same name. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... This article is about the TV series; there is also a mix album of the same name. ...


The 1991 film "White Fang" starring Ethan Hawke was filmed in and around Haines, Alaska. The 1999 John Sayles film Limbo starring David Strathairn, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio and Kris Kristofferson was filmed in Juneau. Sean Penn filmed large portions of the film Into the Wild on location in Alaska. In 2008 the movie 30 Days of Night was filmed partially in Alaska. The 1983 Disney movie Never Cry Wolf was at least partially shot in Alaska as well. For the 2007 film adaption of the book, see Into the Wild (film) For the Warriors book, see Into the Wild (Warriors) Into the Wild (1996) by Jon Krakauer is a bestselling non-fiction book about the adventures of Christopher McCandless. ...


State symbols

  • State bird: Willow Ptarmigan, adopted by the Territorial Legislature in 1955. It is a small (15-17 inches) Arctic grouse that lives among willows and on open tundra and muskeg. Plumage is brown in summer, changing to white in winter. The Willow Ptarmigan is common in much of Alaska.
  • State fish: King Salmon, adopted 1962.
  • State flower: wild/native Forget-Me-Not, adopted by the Territorial Legislature in 1917.[45] It is a perennial that is found throughout Alaska, from Hyder to the Arctic Coast, and west to the Aleutians.
  • State fossil: Woolly Mammoth, adopted 1986.
  • State gem: Jade, adopted 1968.
  • State insect: Four-spot skimmer dragonfly, adopted 1995.
  • State land mammal: Moose, adopted 1998.
  • State marine mammal: Bowhead Whale, adopted 1983.
  • State mineral: Gold, adopted 1968.
  • State song: "Alaska's Flag"
  • State sport: Dog Mushing, adopted 1972.
  • State tree: Sitka Spruce, adopted 1962.
  • State soil: Estelle, adopted unknown.

Binomial name Lagopus lagopus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Willow Grouse (Lagopus lagopus) is a medium-sized bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum, 1792) The Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) - derived from the Greek words onkos (hook), rynchos (nose), is a species of Anadromous fish in the salmon family. ... Species about 50 The Forget-me-nots are the genus Myosotis of flowering plants in the family Boraginaceae. ... For the rock band, see Wooly Mammoth (band). ... A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jade (jadeite) buttons Unworked Jade Jade is used as an ornamental stone, the term jade is applied to two different rocks that are made up of different silicate minerals. ... This article is about the insect. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Bowhead whale range The Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus), also known as Greenland Right Whale or Arctic Whale, is a baleen whale of the right whale family Balaenidae. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Alaskas Flag is the state song of Alaska. ... A team of six white, husky-type dogs Mushing also means playing on a MUSH. Mushing also can be used to describe the kneading behavior of domestic cats when they are content or are preparing to settle for a nap. ... Binomial name Picea sitchensis (Bong. ... Estelle can refer to several meanings: // Look up Estelle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Famous Alaskans

Tom Bodett is an American author, voice actor and radio host, and is also the current spokesman for the hotel chain Motel 6 who is famous for coining the phrase Well leave the light on for you. References [Tom Bodetts website] http://www. ... Susan Howlet Butcher (December 26, 1954 – August 5, 2006) was a dog musher who rose to fame when she became the second woman to win the Iditarod dogsled race in 1986, and went on to become the second four-time winner in 1990, and the first to win four out... Bronze by George Anthonisen. ... For R&B singer Jewell Caples, see Jewell (singer). ... Official campaign photo of Tony Knowles Anthony Carroll Tony Knowles (born January 1, 1943 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American Democratic politician and businessman who served as Governor of Alaska from December 1994 to December 2002. ... Sydney Laurence Sydney Mortimer Laurence (1865–1940) was a romantic landscape painter and is widely considered one of Alaskas most important historical artists. ... Libby Riddles born in Madison, Wisconsin was the first woman to win the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. ... Holly Madison (born December 23, 1979) is one of Hugh Hefners three current girlfriends, known for appearing on the E! reality television series The Girls Next Door, which is the #1-rated program on the E! network. ... This article is about the TV show. ...

See also

  • List of Alaska-related topics
Alaska portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Alaska. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-03.
  2. ^ Vallano, Elissa: Cruising America's 'Last Frontier', Retrieved on May 24, 2007
  3. ^ Naske, Claus-M., and F. Patrick Fitzgerald. "Alaska." World Book Online Reference Center. 2008. 12 January 2008 <http://www.worldbookonline.com/wb/Article?id=ar010640>
  4. ^ Ransom, J. Ellis. 1940. Derivation of the Word ‘Alaska’. American Anthropologist n.s., 42: pp. 550-551
  5. ^ Benson, Carl (1998-09-02). Alaska's Size in Perspective. Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  6. ^ The other three exclaves of the United States are the Northwest Angle of Minnesota, Point Roberts, Washington and Alburgh, Vermont.
  7. ^ Porco, Peter (June 23, 2003). "Long said to be second to Fundy, city tides aren't even close". Anchorage Daily News: A1. 
  8. ^ Alaska Hydrology Survey (HTML). Division of Mining, Land, and Water; Alaska Department of Natural Resources.
  9. ^ Alaska Facts
  10. ^ Western States Data Public Land Acreage
  11. ^ a b Mean Annual Precipitation in Alaska-Yukon. Oregon Climate Service at Oregon State University. Last accessed 23 October 2006.
  12. ^ a b NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards Information - Alaska Weather Interesting Facts and Records (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  13. ^ a b State Extremes. Western Regional Climate Center, Desert Research Institute. Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  14. ^ SD Weather History and Trivia for May: May 1. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  15. ^ FAQ ALASKA - Frequently Asked Questions About Alaska: Weather. Statewide Library Electronic Doorway, University of Alaska Fairbanks (2005-01-17). Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  16. ^ Ned Rozell (2003-01-23). The Coldest Place in North America. Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  17. ^ History for Barrow, Alaska. Monthly Summary for July 2006. Weather Underground. Last accessed 23 October 2006.
  18. ^ http://www.census.gov/population/cen2000/phc-t2/tab01.txt
  19. ^ Alaska Profile of General Demographic Characteristics, American Fact Finder, U.S. Census Bureau.
  20. ^ Data Center Results
  21. ^ Adherents.com
  22. ^ Religious Affiliations 2000. Alaska State Membership Report. Association of Religion Data Archives. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  23. ^ Welcome to SLED :: FAQ Alaska
  24. ^ http://vilda.alaska.edu/u?/cdmg11,4904 An early Russian Orthodox Church
  25. ^ http://www.thearda.com/mapsReports/maps/map.asp?state=101&variable=201 Association of Religion Data Archive
  26. ^ http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/population/religion/ 75 - Christian Church Adherents, 2000, and Jewish Population, 2003--States [Excel 27k]
  27. ^ Craft Brewing Industry Statistics
  28. ^ EIA State Energy Profiles: Alaska (2008-06-12). Retrieved on 2008-06-24.
  29. ^ Screening Report for Alaska Rural Energy Plan, April, 2001
  30. ^ Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation
  31. ^ State of Alaska Permanent Fund Division
  32. ^ CNN Money (2005). How tax friendly is your state? Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/taxesbystate2005/index.html
  33. ^ State of Alaska Office of Economic Development. Alaska Visitor Arrivals and Profile-Summer 2001. November, 2002; retrieved September 11, 2006.
  34. ^ State of Alaska Office of Economic Development. Alaska Visitor Arrivals and Profile-Fall/Winter 2001. November, 2002; retrieved September 11, 2006.
  35. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. 2005 U.S. Civil Airman Statistics
  36. ^ [1]
  37. ^ http://www.gov.state.ak.us/ltgov/elections/regbypty.htm
  38. ^ Volz, Matt (2006-07-11). "Judge rules against Alaska marijuana law". The Seattle Times. Frank A. Blethen. Retrieved on 2008-05-22.
  39. ^ Doughtery, J. (February 25, 2001 ). Alaska party stumps for independence. World Net Daily. Retrieved from http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=21840
  40. ^ a b c d http://www.state.ak.us/courts/ctinfo.htm
  41. ^ Alaska ICE
  42. ^ These are the only three universities in the state ranked by US News and World Report.[2]
  43. ^ http://www.alaska.edu/scholars/faq.xml#scholars_award
  44. ^ www.alaskanativearts.org
  45. ^ Alaska Conservation Foundation - State Symbols

is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Northwest Angle (the purple portion) in Minnesota, bordering Manitoba, Ontario, and Lake of the Woods The Northwest Angle viewed from space The Northwest Angle, known simply as the Angle by locals, and coterminous with Angle Township, is a small part of northern Lake of the Woods County, Minnesota that... A geopolitical oddity, Point Roberts is a small unincorporated community in Whatcom County, Washington, United States. ... Alburgh, Vermont Alburgh (formerly Alburg) is a town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, United States. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Anchorage Daily News is a daily newspaper in Anchorage, Alaska. ... Oregon State University (OSU) is a coeducational, public research university located in Corvallis, Oregon, United States. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is the nonprofit research campus of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), the organization that oversees all publicly-supported higher education in the U.S. state of Nevada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Alaska Fairbanks, located in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, is the second largest campus of the University of Alaska System, and is abbreviated as UAF. UAF is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, as well as participating in the sun-grant program through Oregon State University. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Alaska Fairbanks, located in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, is the second largest campus of the University of Alaska System, and is abbreviated as UAF. UAF is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, as well as participating in the sun-grant program through Oregon State University. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Weather Underground is a commercial weather service which provides free, real-time weather information via the Internet. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Seattle Times is the leading daily newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

External links

Find more about Alaska on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
State Government
  • State of Alaska website
  • Alaska State Databases - Annotated list of searchable databases produced by Alaska state agencies and compiled by the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association.
U.S. Government
  • Energy & Environmental Data for Alaska
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of Alaska
  • US Census Bureau
  • Alaska State Facts
Other
  • Alaska Community Database System
  • Alaska's Digital Archives
  • Alaska, project area of the American Land Conservancy
  • Alaska Inter-Tribal Council


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Preceded by
Arizona
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Admitted on January 3, 1959 (49th)
Succeeded by
Hawaii

Coordinates: 64°N 153°W / 64, -153 Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... -1... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see New Mexico (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands Map showing the location of the islands in the Pacific Ocean (highlighted with red boxes) The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Alaska fly fishing lodges Vacations alaska fly in fishing Alaska Salmon fishing Vacations Alaska bear Viewing lodge (733 words)
A.T.A employs Alaska fly fishing guides that are here to teach the basic Alaska fly fishing techniques to master Alaska Salmon fishing for all 5 species and Alaska fishing for Rainbow Trout.
ATA has been offering Alaska salmon fishing trips since 1985 specializing in Trophy Alaska Salmon fishing on the Alagnak river in Katmai national park 36 miles upstream from Katmai lodge in the best Alaska Salmon fishing and rainbow trout fly fishing beating Katmai lodge to the best water without daily fly outs.
Alaska bear viewing and Fly fishing for Trophy Alaska Salmon and Wild Trout.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m