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Encyclopedia > Alaouite dynasty

The Alaouite Dynasty is the name of the current Moroccan royal family. The name Alaouite comes from the Ali of its founder Moulay Ali Cherif who became Sultan of Tafilalt in 1631. His son Mulay r-Rshid (1664-1672) was able to unite and pacify the country. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Tafilalt or Tafilet is the most important oasis of the Moroccan Sahara, ten days journey south of Fez, across the Atlas. ... Mawlaay al-Rashid (1631-1672) (Arabic: مولاي الرشيد) was Sultan of Morocco from 1666 to 1672. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ...

Contents

Descendance

The Alaouite family claim descent from Muslim prophet Muhammad through the line of ˤAlī ibn Abī-Tālib and Fatima Zahra (Muhammad's daughter). ˤAlī ibn Abī-Tālib was the fourth successor (Khalifah) to Muhammad. Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... This article is about Muhammads daughter. ... Caliph is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ...


Conquest

According to some legends the Alaouites entered Morocco at the end of the 13th Century when Al Hassan Addakhil, who lived then in the town of Yanbu in the Hejaz, was brought to Morocco by the inhabitants of Tafilalet to be their Imām. They were hoping that, as he was a descendant of the prophet Muhammad, his presence would help to improve their date palm crops thanks to his barakah (an Islamic term meaning a sense of divine presence or charisma; "blessing"). His descendants began to increase their power in southern Morocco after the death of the Saˤdi Ahmad I al-Mansur (1578-1603). (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... l-Hesn d-Dakhl (Standard Arabic: الحسن الداخل al-Hassan ad-Dākhil The One who Entered) is the grandfather of Mulay ˤLi Shrif, founder of the Alaouite Dynasty, which is the current Moroccan royal family. ... NASA photograph of Yanbu al Bahr Yanbu al Bahr (arabic: ينبع البحر spring by the sea), also known simply as Yanbu, Yambo, or Yenbo, is a major Red Sea port in the Al Madinah province of western Saudi Arabia. ... Map with the region outlined in red and the 1923 Kingdom in green “Hedjaz” redirects here. ... Tafilalt or Tafilet (Arabic: ) is a region and the most important oasis of the Moroccan Sahara; it is also considered one of the largest oasis in the world, the oasis is entirely located along the Ziz River. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sayyid. ... Binomial name L. The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is a palm in the genus Phoenix, extensively cultivated for its edible fruit. ... For other uses, see Baraka. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Saadi Dynasty of Saadi Empire began with the reign of Sultan Mohammed I in 1554, and ended in 1659 with the end of the reign of Sultan Ahmad II. The Saadi family claimed descent from the Islamic prophet Muhammad, through the line of Ali ibn Abi Talib and Fatima... Ahmad I al-Mansur Saadi (also Ahmed el-Mansour) (Arabic: أحمد المنصور السعدي) was Sultan of Morocco from 1578 to his death in 1603, the sixth ruler of the Saadi Dynasty. ...


In 1659, the last sultan of the Saadi Dynasty was overthrown in the conquest of Marrakech by Mulay r-Rshid (1664-1672). After the victory over the zawiya of Dila, who controlled northern Morocco, he was able to unite and pacify the country. The Saadi Dynasty of Saadi Empire began with the reign of Sultan Mohammed I in 1554, and ended in 1659 with the end of the reign of Sultan Ahmad II. The Saadi family claimed descent from the Islamic prophet Muhammad, through the line of Ali ibn Abi Talib and Fatima... For the record label, see Marrakesh Records. ... Mawlaay al-Rashid (1631-1672) (Arabic: مولاي الرشيد) was Sultan of Morocco from 1666 to 1672. ... Zaouia (Arabic زاوية corner), also spelled zawiya or zawiyah, is a Maghrebi and West African term for an Islamic religious school cum monastery, roughly corresponding to the Eastern term madrassa. In precolonial times, these were the primary sources for education in the area, and taught basic literacy to a large proportion...


The organization of the kingdom developed under Ismail Ibn Sharif (1672-1727), who, against the opposition of local tribes began to create a unified state. Because the Alaouites, in contrast to previous dynasties, did not have the support of a single Berber or Bedouin tribe, Isma'īl controlled Morocco through an army of black slaves. With these soldiers he drove the English from Tangiers (1684) and the Spanish from Larache (1689.) However, the unity of Morocco did not survive his death - in the ensuing power struggles the tribes became a political and military force once again. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Berbers are the indigenous peoples of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. ... A Bedouin man on a hillside at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic ( ), a name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Arab nomadic pastoralist groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via the Western... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Tangier (in Berber and Arabic Tanja, in Spanish Tánger and in French Tanger) is a city of northern Morocco with a population of 350,000, or 550,000 including suburbs. ... Larache (also Laraish, El Araish العرائش) is a port city located in northern Morocco on the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Only with Muhammad III (1757-1790) could the kingdom be pacified again and the administration reorganized. A renewed attempt at centralization was abandoned and the tribes allowed to preserve their autonomy. Under Abderrahmane (1822-1859) Morocco fell under the influence of the European powers. When Morocco supported the Algerian independence movement of the Emir Abd al-Qadir, it was heavily defeated by the French in 1844 and made to abandon its support. Sidi Mohammed III Ben Abdellah al-Qatib (17??-1790) (Arabic: محمد الثالث بن عبد الله الخطيب) was Sultan of Morocco from 1757 to 1790 under the Alaouite Dynasty and originating from the Moasmouda tribe. ... Moulay Abderrahmane (Arabic: عبد الرحمان) was sultan of Morocco from 1822 to 1859. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Entrance to the emirs palace in Bukhara. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


From Muhammad IV (1859-1873) and Hassan I (1873-1894) the Alaouites tried to foster trading links, above all with European countries and the United States. The army and administration were also modernised, to improve control over the Berber and Bedouin tribes. With the war against Spain (1859-1860) came direct involvement in European affairs - although the independence of Morocco was guaranteed in the Conference of Madrid (1880), the French gained ever greater influence. German attempts to counter this growing influence led to the First Moroccan Crisis of 1905-1906 and the Second Moroccan Crisis (1911.) Eventually the Moroccans were forced to recognise the French Protectorate on December 3, 1912. At the same time the Rif area of northern Morocco was given up to Spain. Mohammed IV was Sultan of Morocco from 1859 to 1873, and was a member of the Alaouite Dynasty. ... Hassan I in Meknes Hassan I of Morocco (Arabic: الحسن الأول) (b. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The First Moroccan Crisis (also known as the Tangier Crisis) refers to the international crisis over the colonial status of Morocco between March 1905 and May 1906. ... The Agadir Crisis, also called the Second Moroccan Crisis, was the international tension sparked by the deployment of a German warship to the Moroccan port of Agadir on July 1, 1911. ... This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ... This is about a region in Morocco: RIF is also an acronym/initialism. ...


Under the protectorate (1912-1956) the infrastructure was invested in heavily in order to link the cities of the Atlantic coast to the hinterland, thus creating a single economic area for Morocco. However the regime faced the opposition of the tribes - when the Berber were required to come under the jurisdiction of French courts in 1930 it marked the beginning of the independence movement. In 1944, the independence party Istqlal was founded, supported by the Sultan Muhammad V (1927-1961). Although banned in 1953, France was obliged to grant Morocco independence on March 2, 1956, leaving behind them a legacy of urbanisation and the beginnings of an industrial economy. The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... Istiqlal offices in Casablanca The Istiqlal or Independence Party (Arabic: حزب الإستقلال hizb al-istiqlāl, French: Parti de lIstiqlal) is a political party in Morocco. ... Sultan Mohammed V of Morocco visiting Lawrence Livermore Lab, United States, in 1957 Mohammed V (August 10, 1909–February 26, 1961) was Sultan of Morocco from 1927 to 1953 and 1955 to 1961. ...


See also

This is a partial list of rulers of Morocco, including the historical precursors to the modern state. ... The Capsian culture brought Morocco into the Neolithic about 8000 BC, at a time when the Maghreb was less arid than it is today. ...

Further reading

president of the American University of Beirut ...

External links

Preceded by
Saadi Dynasty
Alaouite Dynasty
1666 – Present day
Succeeded by
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alaouite Dynasty Information (623 words)
The Alaouite family claim descent from Muhammad through the line of ˤAlī ibn Abī-Tālib and Fatima Zahra (Muhammad's daughter).
Because the Alaouites, in contrast to previous dynasties, did not have the support of a single Berber or Bedouin tribe, Isma'īl controlled Morrocco through an army of fl slaves.
Although banned in 1953, France was obliged to grant Morocco independence on March 2 1956, leaving behind them a legacy of urbanisation and the beginnings of an industrial economy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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