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Encyclopedia > Alan Scott
Green Lantern


Alan Scott, the original Green Lantern.
Cover art for JSA # 77 by Alex Ross. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The many incarnations of the DC Comics superhero Green Lantern have had many alternate versions of themselves. ... Allan Scott (May 23, 1906, Arlington, New Jersey, USA - April 13, 1995, Santa Monica, California) was a screenwriter that was nominated for an Academy Award for So Proudly We Hail!. Allan was the father of actor Pippa Scott, and brother of film producer and screenwriter Adrian Scott. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance All-American Comics #16 (July 1940)
Created by Bill Finger
Martin Nodell
Characteristics
Alter ego Alan Ladd Wellington Scott
Team
affiliations
Justice Society of America
Checkmate
All-Star Squadron
Sentinels of Magic
Notable aliases Green Lantern, Sentinel, White King
Abilities Flight, solid light constructs, mystical tracking, longevity

Alan Scott is a fictional character, a superhero from the DC Comics universe and the first superhero to bear the name Green Lantern. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Checkmate is a fictional covert operations agency within the DC Comics universe. ... The All-Star Squadron was an American comic book (1981-1987) created by Roy Thomas and published by DC Comics about the adventures of a large team of superheroes which comprised of most of the feature characters owned by the company that appeared in the Golden Age of Comic Books... The Sentinels of Magic is a fictional group of magically powered heroes in the DC Comics Universe who fist appeared in Day of Judgement. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ...

Contents

Publication history

The original Green Lantern was created by young struggling artist Martin Nodell, who was inspired by the sight of a New York Subway employee waving a red lantern to stop a train for track work and a green lantern once the track was clear. With the name in hand and borrowing heavily from the story of Aladdin, Nodell created a mystical crimefighter who got his powers from the flame of a strange lamp. Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... South Ferry station 125th Street station The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system in New York City, New York, United States. ... Aladdin in the Magic Garden, an illustration by Max Liebert from Ludwig Fuldas Aladin und die Wunderlampe Aladdin (an adaptation of the Arabic name , Arabic: علاء الدين literally nobility of faith) is one of the tales with an Ancient Arabian origin[1] in The Book of One Thousand and One Nights...


Nodell was teamed with writer Bill Finger, who wrote the scripts for stories, which were often drawn by Martin Nodell and sometimes by ghost artists such as Irwin Hasen. William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Irwin Hasen was a cartoonist whose work included the creation of the comic book character Wildcat as well as work on the comic strip Dondi. ...


The character made his debut in All-American Comics #16 (July 1940). The art was credited to Nodell via his pseudonym "Mart Dellon". Like many creators of the time, Nodell hoped to keep the stigma of comic books from tarnishing his career in commercial illustration.


According to Mordecai Richler, "there is no doubt... that The Green Lantern has its origin in Hassidic mythology" [1]. However, Richler gives no reasons for saying this. Creator Martin Nodell has written that he originally intended to name the character Alan Ladd, after Aladdin, but changed the name to avoid confusion with the movie actor of the same name. Nodell mentions Richard Wagner's opera cycle The Ring of the Nibelungen and the sight of a trainman's green railway lantern as inspirations.[2] Alan Walbridge Ladd (September 3, 1913 – November 7, 1964) was an American film actor. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Valkyrie Warrior Maiden by artist Arthur Rackham (1912) Der Ring des Nibelungen translated commonly into English as The Ring of the Nibelung or The Nibelungs Ring, is a series of four epic operas. ...


Scott was a charter member of the Justice Society of America, beginning in All Star Comics #3 (Winter 1940). He served as the team's second chairman, in #7, but departed following that issue and returned a few years later. He has been a key member of the group ever since, appearing in all three titles bearing the teams' name. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ...


Fictional character biography

Discovery

Thousands of years ago, a mystical "green flame" fell to Earth. The voice of the flame prophesied that it would act three times: once to bring death, once to bring life, and once to bring power. By 1940, after having already fulfilled the first two-thirds of this prophecy, the flame had been fashioned into a metal lantern, which fell into the hands of Alan Scott, a young railroad engineer. Following a railroad bridge collapse, the flame instructs Scott in how to fashion a ring from its metal, to give him fantastic powers as the superhero Green Lantern. He adopts a colorful costume (setting himself apart from his successors, as he wore both red and purple in his outfit, besides the standard green) and becomes a crimefighter. Image File history File links All-AmericanComics16. ... Image File history File links All-AmericanComics16. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... Sheldon Shelly Moldoff (born April 14, 1920, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist best known for co-creating such DC Comics characters as Hawkgirl and Poison Ivy, and as one of Bob Kanes primary ghost artists (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman. ... Stone lantern in a Chinese Garden A chōchin invites customers into an okonomiyaki restaurant in Japan A lantern is a portable lighting device used to illuminate broad areas. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Scott uses his ring to fly, to walk through solid objects (by "moving through the fourth dimension"),[3] to paralyze or blind people temporarily, to create rays of energy, to melt metal as with a blowtorch, and to cause dangerous objects to glow, among other things. Occasionally uses it to create solid objects and force fields in the manner usually associated with fellow Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and to read minds. His ring could protect him against any object made of metal, but would not protect him against any wood or plant based objects. This was said to be because the green flame was an incarnation of the strength of "green, growing things". Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ...


During the 1940s, Green Lantern seemed to alternate between serious adventure - particularly when his arch-nemesis, Solomon Grundy, appeared - and light comedy, usually involving his sidekick Doiby Dickles. Toward the end of his Golden Age adventures, he was even reduced to the role of a sidekick to Streak the Wonder Dog, a heroic canine cut from the mold of Rin-Tin-Tin and Lassie. Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... Charles Doiby Dickles was the comic sidekick to the golden age Green Lantern Alan Scott. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dē, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... 1928 movie ad Rin Tin Tin (often billed as Rin-Tin-Tin in the 1920s and 1930s) was the name given to several German Shepherd dogs in film and television. ... Lassie filming on location in Florida (photo courtesy State Archive of Florida) Lassie, a female rough collie fictional character has starred in, or been the subject of, many radio shows, movies, TV shows, and books, entertaining generations of children around the world from 1938 to the present. ...


Justice Society of America

Green Lanterns of two worlds: The Silver Age Hal Jordan meets the Golden Age Alan Scott in Green Lantern #40 (Oct. 1965). Cover art by Gil Kane & Murphy Anderson.
Green Lanterns of two worlds:
The Silver Age Hal Jordan meets the Golden Age Alan Scott in Green Lantern #40 (Oct. 1965). Cover art by Gil Kane & Murphy Anderson.

Scott was a member of the JSA in 1951 when the team was investigated by the "Joint Congressional Un-American Activities Committee," a fictional organization based on the real-life House Un-American Activities Committee but stated to have been created after the death of Senator Joseph McCarthy on Earth-2. They were accused of possible Communist sympathies and asked to reveal their identities. The JSA declined, and most of the membership retired in the 1950s. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (889x1314, 692 KB) Summary Cover, Green Lantern #40, DC, October 1965, Cover Credits: Gil Kane (Pencils) Murphy Anderson (inks) Source: http://comics. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (889x1314, 692 KB) Summary Cover, Green Lantern #40, DC, October 1965, Cover Credits: Gil Kane (Pencils) Murphy Anderson (inks) Source: http://comics. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... A silver age is a name often given to a particular period within a history, typically as a lesser and later successor to a golden age, the metal silver generally being valuable, but less so than gold. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Murphy Anderson (born 1926) is an American comic book penciller and inker who has worked for companies such as DC Comics for over 50 years, starting in the 1930s-40s Golden Age of Comic Books. ... The House Committee on Un-American Activities or HUAC (1945-1975) was an investigating committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... For other persons named Joseph McCarthy, see Joseph McCarthy (disambiguation). ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... For other uses of this term, please see Secret identity (disambiguation). ...


One piece of retroactive continuity fills out Scott's early history: All-Star Squadron Annual #3 states that the JSA fought a being named Ian Karkull who imbued them with energy that retarded their aging, allowing Scott and many others (as well as their spouses) to remain active into the late 20th century without infirmity. The events of that incident also led to his taking a leave of absence from the JSA, explaining why the character vanished from the roster for a time. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Also, during this period, he and his friend Jay Garrick (also known as the Flash) had an encounter with Abin Sur, the Green Lantern who preceded Hal Jordan; tracking a criminal to Earth, Sur's ring is immobilised by his foe forming a yellow barrier around the ring. Sur then secretly borrows Alan's ring after he and Jay were knocked unconscious. With the new ring, which lacks a weakness to yellow, Sur was able to take his foe by surprise and defeat him, before returning the ring to Alan and leaving Earth. Jay Garrick is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe and the first Flash. ... Abin Sur is a fictional character and a superhero from the DC Comics universe. ...


The team re-formed in the 1960s with Scott as a member, though little is known of their adventures during this time save for their team-ups with the Justice League of America, of the parallel world Earth-1, and a few cross-universe adventures Scott shared with Earth-1's Green Lantern, Hal Jordan. For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ...


From the late 1940s to the 1970s, Scott runs the Gotham Broadcasting Company (GBC). The company ends up ruined by creditors. The Psycho Pirate temporarily drives Alan mad and the rest of the JSA help him recover. Jay Garrick helps him start a new career as a scientist, although he eventually regains control of the GBC and is still running it to this day. The Psycho-Pirate is the name of two DC comics supervillains, dating back to the Golden Age of Comics. ...


Progeny

It was eventually revealed that in the late 1950s or early 1960s, Scott marries the woman with the dual identity Rose and Thorn, and the two had a pair of children who would grow up to become the superheroes Jade and Obsidian of the team Infinity Inc. Rose and Thorn are the two personalities of a character in DC comic books. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Obsidian is a fictional character who has been both a superhero and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Infinity Inc. ...


In the 1980s, Scott married his longtime nemesis (now reformed) Molly Mayne, also known as The Harlequin, and reconciles with his son and daughter. For the Jokers sidekick, see Harley Quinn Harlequin is the name of four clown-themed DC Comics characters. ... For the Jokers sidekick, see Harley Quinn Harlequin is the name of four clown-themed DC Comics characters. ...


Post-Crisis and Ragnarok

Following Crisis on Infinite Earths, which merged all parallel realities into one, the source of Scott's power would be retconned to be the mystical "Starheart", the gathered magical characteristics of the Earth-1 Universe by the Oan Guardians of the Universe. This collective force was hidden in the heart of a star and became sentient. The force also helps retard Scott's aging process. Another story implied a connection to Yalan Gur, an ancient member of the Green Lantern Corps. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... The Guardians of the Universe are fictional characters in the DC Comics universe. ... Sentience is the capacity for basic consciousness -- the ability to feel or perceive, not necessarily including the faculty of self-awareness. ... The fictional Green Lantern Corps is an intergalactic police force featured in DC Comics, particularly series featuring the superhero Green Lantern, Earth’s member of the group. ...


Also following the Crisis was the one-shot Last Days of the Justice Society of America Special (1986). This told how Adolph Hitler (in 1945) causes a massive wave of destructive energy to erupt yet, time-displaced, it appears over the post-Crisis earth. Scott and the JSA, fresh from burying their Earth-Two comrades Robin and Huntress, enter into a limbo dimension in order to fight an eternally recurring Ragnarok. Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Return

Through the machinations of Waverider the JSA teammates are able to leave limbo and begin living in the post-Crisis earth which they had fought to save (Armageddon: Inferno 1992). That mini-series is followed by Justice Society of America (1992-1993) which shows how Alan Scott adjusts to his new world. In the short-lived series the JSA fight the newest incarnation of the Ultra-Humanite as well as Pol St. Germain and Kulak the Sorcerer. Scott reconnects with his wife and children, in issue #1 he states that Molly "is pretty much handling things at the company..." and of Jade and Obsidian, "They're fine -- off doing their own thing in Hollywood. Not too interested in being super-heroes." The series ends with issue #10, not with the team disbanding but with the members gathered together at their first formal meeting after returning home.


Zero Hour

The JSA continues crimefighting activity until a disastrous battle with the villain Extant, during which Scott is physically aged to a point closer to his actual age, prompting him to semi-retirement. Extant also kills three of Scott's friends, Hourman, Atom and Dr. Mid-Nite. Monarch is the name of a DC Comics supervillain created by Archie Goodwin, Denny ONeil and Dan Jurgens. ...


For a time, the Starheart became part of Scott's body and he adopts the name Sentinel, becoming a founding member of a new JSA. Thanks to the rejuvenative properties of the Starheart, Scott's physical body was again temporarily revitalized so that he resembles a man in his 30s or early 40s. This drives his wife Molly, who has not been affected, to sell her soul to the demon Neron in exchange for youth. Alan enters a demonic realm, with help from entities such as the Phantom Stranger and Zatanna. He manages to win Molly's soul back. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... For the US Weather Observation Network, see NERON. Neron is also an alternative name of the Roman Emperor Nero. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


He has since been physically altered again so that he more closely resembles his true chronological age. He returns to using the name Green Lantern during the JSA's battle with Mordru. He continues to fight crime in his original costumed identity, using a ring again, serving as an elder statesman to the JSA and to the superhero community in general. // Character Biography Mordru (also known as Mordru the Merciless) is a fictional character, a supervillain in the DC Comics Universe whose main foes are the Legion of Super-Heroes in the future world of the 30th and 31st centuries and the Justice Society of America and the Lord of Order... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ...


During the Rann-Thanagar War, Kyle Rayner's power ring revealed that Scott is an honorary member of the Green Lantern Corps. Rann-Thanagar War #1; cover by Ivan Reis and Marc Campos. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


Infinite Crisis and "One Year Later"

During the Infinite Crisis, Scott and his daughter Jade, along with many others, traveled with Donna Troy to the center of the universe to save the universe from an unknown threat; later revealed to be Alexander Luthor, Jr.. Jade died on that mission. One Year Later, Scott appears to be still active, still relatively youthful in comparison to his true age, but now wears an eye-patch due to losing his eye in a Zeta beam transporter accident while returning from space. Even though Scott lost his daughter he states to Kyle Rayner that he still has family both by relation and close friendship among which he counts Kyle. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ... One Year Later event logo. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


During the missing year, Scott has joined Checkmate at the rank of White King. Scott assigned his JSA teammate Mister Terrific as his bishop. Checkmate is a fictional covert operations agency within the DC Comics universe. ... Michael Holt is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ...

The death of Jade. Art by Ivan Reis.
The death of Jade. Art by Ivan Reis.

Scott soon finds himself in a moral conflict with Black Queen Sasha Bordeaux over the violent nature of Checkmate, particularly after Bordeaux and her team slaughter dozens of Kobra operatives during a raid on a facility. Bordeaux contends that the ends justify the means, while Scott adheres to the principle that heroes should not kill unless absolutely necessary; Bordeaux responds to this by suggesting that Scott resign. Concurrent with this internal conflict, Scott and "White Queen" Amanda Waller are trying to keep the organization from being discontinued by political forces. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Ivan Reis (real name Rodrigo Ivan dos Reis ), born 1976 in São Paulo, is a Brazilian comic book artist. ... Sasha Bordeaux is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Dr. Amanda Blake Waller is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ...


The fourth issue of the 52 maxi-series reveals that Scott lost his left eye during a period when he and several other superheroes had been declared missing (approximately 11 months prior to the events of Checkmate #1). The Zeta Beam that Adam Strange was hoping to use for teleporting the heroes in space away from the time-space ripple caused by Alexander Luthor, Jr. actions was splintered by the ripple itself, mutilating the heroes in various ways. His missing eye was later replaced by a portion of his daughter Jade's mystic green energy. After being put into a comatose state during an attack by the Gentleman Ghost, Jade appeared to him, told him goodbye and granted him another portion of her green energy. His missing eye is currently replaced by a green glowing orb that, due to its mystical origins and connection to Jade, allows him to track astral and mystical energy forms such as ghosts. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Alexander Luthor, Jr. ... The Gentleman Ghost is a recurring nemesis of Hawkman and Hawkgirl. ...


Other versions

Main article: Alternate versions of Green Lantern

The many incarnations of the DC Comics superhero Green Lantern have had many alternate versions of themselves. ...

In other media

Main article: Green Lantern in other media

Alan Scott has not yet been depicted in any animated or live action adaptations of DC Comics properties. According to Bruce Timm, there were plans to use Scott and the other Justice Society of America characters in a crossover episode of Justice League, but copyright issues with DC prevented them from doing so (later, some characters traditionally associated with the JSA would have minor roles on the follow up series Justice League Unlimited, one of them apparently Scott's son Obsidian). Instead, a character similar to Alan Scott, the Green Guardsman, AKA: Scott Mason (voiced by William Katt), meant to be both an homage and parody of Alan Scott, appears in the first season episode Legends as part of the Justice Guild of America (JGA). The DC Comics superhero Green Lantern (alter ego: Hal Jordan) has appeared in numerous media over the years. ... Bruce Walter Timm (born on February 8, 1961) is an American character designer, animator and producer. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... William Katt is an American film and television actor. ...


References

  1. ^ Mordecai Richler, The Great Comic Book Heroes, Encounter, 1965, reprinted in three different volumes of essays by Mordecai Richler: Hunting Tigers Under Glass, 1968; Notes on an Endangered Species and Others, 1974, and The Great Comic Book Heroes and Other Essays, 1978
  2. ^ Martin Nodell, Preface to The Golden Age Green Lantern Archives volume 1, 1999
  3. ^  Bill Finger (w),  Martin Nodell (p,i).  All-American Comics vol. 1,  #16 July, 1940  DC Comics (1-8)

William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...

External links

Significant Allies:
Flash (Jay Garrick) | Green Lantern (Hal Jordan) | Ion (Kyle Rayner) | Hawkman (Carter Hall) | Wildcat (Ted Grant) | Justice Society of America
Significant Enemies:
Gambler (Steven Sharpe) | Harlequin (Molly Mayne) | Icicle | Sky Pirate | Solomon Grundy | Sportsmaster (Crusher Crook) | Vandal Savage
Other Associates:
Doiby Dickles | Rose Canton | Jade | Obsidian

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alan Scott - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1939 words)
Alan Scott is a fictional hero from the DC Comics universe and the first superhero to bear the name Green Lantern.
Scott used his ring to fly, to walk through solid objects (by "moving through the fourth dimension"), to paralyze or blind people temporarily, to create rays of energy, to melt metal as with a blowtorch, and to cause dangerous objects to glow, among other things.
Scott was a member of the JSA in 1951 when the team was investigated by the "Joint Congressional Un-American Activities Committee," a fictional organization based on the real-life House Un-American Activities Committee but stated to have been created after the death of Senator Joseph McCarthy on Earth-2.
Alan Scott (534 words)
Alan Scott, professor emeritus in the Department of Journalism, College of Communication, died August 23, 2001.
Scott used to joke that had there been e-mail in 1968, UT would have been the first university to be chartered, and not Ohio State University, because the mail reached national headquarters in New York City faster from there.
Scott was a strong believer in the value of professional experience, and always looked for opportunities to expose students to the practice of public relations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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