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Encyclopedia > Alan MacDiarmid

Alan Graham MacDiarmid ONZ, (born April 24, 1927) is a chemist. He was one of three people awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work on conductive polymers. Badge of the Order of New Zealand The Order of New Zealand is the highest locally awarded honour in the New Zealand Honours System. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... // Introduction The fundamental component of chemistry is that it involves matter in some way (this explains its broad reach). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to the present day. ... Conductive polymers are organic polymer semiconductors. ...


MacDiarmid was born in Masterton, New Zealand. His family was relatively poor, and the Great Depression made life difficult. At around age ten, he developed an interest in chemistry from one of his father's old textbooks, and he instructed himself on the subject from this book and from library books. He later worked as an assistant at the chemistry department of Victoria University of Wellington, and eventually studied there. He graduated in 1951 with first class honours, and won a Fulbright Fellowship to the University of Wisconsin for a PhD, which he received in 1953. He received another Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 1955. He later worked in the School of Chemistry at the University of St Andrews and is currently faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Texas at Dallas. Masterton is the largest town (and local government district) in the Wairarapa region in the southeastern North Island of New Zealand. ... The Great Depression was a massive global economic recession (or depression) that ran from 1929 to approximately 1939. ... // Introduction The fundamental component of chemistry is that it involves matter in some way (this explains its broad reach). ... Victoria University of Wellington is the oldest university in Wellington, New Zealand, established in 1897 as the fifth constituent college of the University of New Zealand by an Act of Parliament. ... The Fulbright Program is a program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State and by governments in other countries. ... The University of Wisconsin was founded in 1848 and is the largest university in the state of Wisconsin. ... Doctor of Philosophy, or Ph. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410 and 1413 and is the oldest university in Scotland (and third oldest in the English speaking world after Oxford and Cambridge ). The university is situated in the Royal Burgh of St Andrews, on the east coast of Scotland. ... The University of Pennsylvania (Penn is the moniker used by the university itself; UPenn is also common) is a private, nonsectarian, research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The University of Texas at Dallas is a branch of the UT system, which, despite its name, is located in the Dallas suburb of Richardson, Texas. ...


The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology at Victoria University is named after him. The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (often simply called the MacDiarmid Institute) is a New Zealand research organisation specialising in materials science and nanotechnology. ...


He was awarded New Zealand highest honour ONZ in 2001. Badge of the Order of New Zealand The Order of New Zealand is the highest locally awarded honour in the New Zealand Honours System. ...


External links

  • Nobel autobiography
  • MacDiarmid's page at the University of Pennsylvania
  • New Zealand Edge biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alan MacDiarmid, Conductive Polymers, and Plastic Batteries - DOE R&D Accomplishments (1099 words)
MacDiarmid invited the student's instructor to join his team in the United States, and this collaboration soon led to further findings.
MacDiarmid's team reasoned that the ability of polyacetylene to conduct electricity was probably promoted by trace impurities contributed by the catalysts involved in the Japanese student's process.
Alan MacDiarmid shares the 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Alan J. Heeger of the University of California at Santa Barbara, and Hideki Shirakawa, University of Tsukuba, Japan," for the discovery and development of conductive polymers."
Alan MacDiarmid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (242 words)
Alan Graham MacDiarmid ONZ, (born April 24, 1927) is a chemist.
He was one of three people awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work on conductive polymers.
The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology at Victoria University is named after him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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