FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Alan Lloyd Hodgkin
Alan Lloyd Hodgkin photo: taken 1963 Nobel prize photo
Alan Lloyd Hodgkin photo: taken 1963 Nobel prize photo

Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin, OM, KBE, FRS (February 5, 1914December 20, 1998) was a British physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Andrew Fielding Huxley on the basis of nerve "action potentials," the electrical impulses that enable the activity of an organism to be coordinated by a central nervous system. Hodgkin and Huxley shared the prize that year with John Carew Eccles, who was cited for research on synapses. Hodgkin and Huxley's findings led the pair to hypothesize ion channels, which were confirmed only decades later. Image File history File links Nobel_in_Medicine. ... Image File history File links Alan_Lloyd_Hodgkin. ... Image File history File links Alan_Lloyd_Hodgkin. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Physiology (in Greek physis = nature and logos = word) is the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms. ... Biophysics (also biological physics) is an interdisciplinary science that applies the theories and methods of physical sciences, especially those of physics, to questions of biology. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley OM FRS (born 22 November 1917, Hampstead, London, England, UK) is a British physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Alan Lloyd Hodgkin on the basis of nerve action potentials, the electrical impulses that enable the... A. A schematic view of an idealized action potential illustrates its various phases as the action potential passes a point on a cell membrane. ... A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ... Sir John Carew Eccles (January 27, 1903 – May 2, 1997) was an Australian neurophysiologist who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on the synapse. ... Illustration of the major elements in a prototypical synapse. ... Another, unrelated ion channeling process is part of ion implantation. ...


The experimental measurements on which the pair based their action potential theory represent one of the earliest applications of a technique of electrophysiology known as the "voltage clamp". The second critical element of their research was the so-called giant axon of Atlantic squid (Loligo pealei), which enabled them to record ionic currents as they would not have been able to do in almost any other neuron, such cells being too small to study by the techniques of the time. The experiments took place at the University of Cambridge beginning in the 1930s and continuing into the 1940s, after interruption by World War II. Electrophysiology is the study of the electrical properties of biological cells and tissues. ... Electrophysiology is the science and branch of physiology that pertains to the flow of ions in biological tissues and, in particular, to the electrical recording techniques that enable the measurement of this flow. ... The squid giant axon is the very large (up to 1 mm in diameter; typically around 0. ... Drawing by Santiago Ramón y Cajal of cells in the pigeon cerebellum. ... The University of Cambridge (often called Cambridge University, or just Cambridge), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... // Events and trends World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atomic bomb. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the use of images on this page may require cleanup, involving adjustment of image placement, formatting, size, or other adjustments. ...


During the war he volunteered to work on Aviation Medicine at Farnborough and was subsequently transferred to the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) where he worked on the development of centimetric radar, including the design of the Village Inn airborne gun-laying system. First flight, December 17, 1903 Aviation or air transport refers to the activities surrounding human flight and the aircraft industry. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) was established in Malvern, England in 1940 as the central research group for RAF applications of radar. ... This long range radar antenna, known as ALTAIR, is used to detect and track space objects in conjunction with ABM testing at the Ronald Reagan Test Site on the Kwajalein atoll[1]. Radar is a system that uses radio waves to detect, determine the distance of, and map, objects such... The AGLT Village Inn FN150 tail turret as fitted on a Lancaster. ...


Hodgkin and Huxley subsequently published their theory in 1952. 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Confirmation of ion channels came with the development of the patch clamp, which led to a Nobel prize in 1991 to Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann. Patch clamp technique is technique in electrophysiology that allows the study of individual ion channels in cells. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Erwin Neher (born 1944 in Landsberg am Lech, Bavaria) is a German biologist. ... Bert Sakmann (born June 12, 1942 in Stuttgart) is a German cell physiologist. ...


Hodgkin was educated at Gresham's School, Holt, Norfolk and Trinity College, Cambridge. He was knighted in 1972 and appointed to the Order of Merit in 1973. From 1970 to 1975 he was President of the Royal Society, and from 1978 to 1984 he was Master of Trinity College. Gresham’s School is an independent, fully co-educational HMC boarding school set in the beautiful town of Holt in the North Norfolk countryside. ... Holt is a market town in the county of Norfolk, England. ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

  • Nobel biography of Hodgkin
  • BBC obituary
  • Speech at Nobel banquet, 1963
  • Action Potential Paper
Honorary Titles
Preceded by:
The Lord Blackett
President of the Royal Society
1970–1975
Succeeded by:
The Lord Todd
Preceded by:
The Lord Butler of Saffron Walden
Master of Trinity College, Cambridge
1978–1984
Succeeded by:
Sir Andrew Huxley
Preceded by:
The Lord Adrian
Chancellor of the University of Leicester
1971–1984
Succeeded by:
Sir George Porter

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alan Lloyd Hodgkin Biography (1914-1998) (778 words)
Hodgkin was born on February 5, 1914, in Banbury, Oxfordshire, England, to George L. and Mary Wilson Hodgkin.
Hodgkin was educated at the DownsSchool in Malvern and the Gresham School in Holt.
In 1951, Hodgkin and his colleagues published the results of their research.They found that the membrane is permeable only to specific ions during the resting potential, because of the differing concentrations of potassium and sodium.
Alan Lloyd Hodgkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (350 words)
Hodgkin and Huxley shared the prize that year with John Carew Eccles, who was cited for research on synapses.
Hodgkin and Huxley's findings led the pair to hypothesize ion channels, which were confirmed only decades later.
Hodgkin was educated at Gresham's School, Holt, Norfolk and Trinity College, Cambridge.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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