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Encyclopedia > Alan Freed

Alan Freed (December 15, 1921January 20, 1965), also known as Moondog, was an American disc-jockey (DJ) who became internationally known for promoting African-American Rhythm and Blues (R&B) music on the radio in the United States and Europe under the name of Rock and Roll. Many of the top African American performers of the first generation of rock and roll (such as Little Richard and Chuck Berry) salute Alan Freed for his pioneering attitude in breaking down racial barriers among the youth of 1950s America. His career was destroyed by the payola scandal that hit the broadcasting industry in the early 1960s. Alan Freed may refer to : Alan Freed, 1950s disc-jockey called Moondog heard on WINS, New York and other stations Alan Freed, XM Satellite Radio disc-jockey and Music director (2005) Category: ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Rhythm and blues (also known as R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926 in St. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Pay to Play#In Music be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

"Father of Rock and Roll"

While Alan Freed called himself the "father of rock and roll", he was not the first to play it on the airwaves, but is credited for coining and popularizing the term "Rock and Roll" to describe a style of music. He was a promoter and he was very successful at what he did, until his own personal failings became exploited by others. They built their own careers upon the legacy created by Freed, while Freed's personal career was obliterated. The following alphabetical lists includes men and women commonly known as the father or mother of something. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Pioneer Many of the top African American performers of the 1950s have given public credit to Alan Freed for pioneering racial integration among the youth of America at a time when the adults were still promoting racial strife. Little Richard has appeared in several programs about that era, to give the credit to Alan Freed that others have denied him. An example of Freed's non-racist attitude is preserved in motion pictures in which he personally played a part as himself with many of the leading African-American acts of that day. His influence and the music that he promoted crossed artificial racial barriers that were in place during the 1950s. Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ...


In the 1956 film Rock Rock Rock Freed, as himself, tells the audience that, "Rock and Roll is a river of music that has absorbed many streams: rhythm and blues, jazz, rag time, cowboy songs, country songs, folk songs. All have contributed to the Big Beat." '


"The Moondog"

After leaving WAKR in Akron, where he played hot jazz and pop recordings, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio.[1] Freed had met Leo Mintz in 1948 and saw how Mintz's customers at Cleveland's Record Rendezvous enjoyed Rhythm and Blues records. With Mintz's sponsorship, Freed started at WJW-AM (850) with a late night radio show called " The Moondog Rock Roll House Party" in July 1951.[2] While in Cleveland he organized the first rock and roll concert at Cleveland Arena called "The Moondog Coronation Ball" on March 21, 1952. The event, attended mainly by African Americans, proved a huge drawing card — the first event had to be ended early due to overcrowding. WAKR is an AM radio station in Akron, Ohio, USA operating on 1590 kHz. ... Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World Location within the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City  62. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... For the complete history of WKNR in Cleveland from 1990 to 2001, and its predecessor WGAR (AM), see WHKW. WKNR is an AM all-sports station in Cleveland, Ohio, broadcasting at 850 kHz with its transmitter in North Royalton, Ohio and studios at its former transmitter site in Broadview Heights... Cleveland Arena was an arena in Cleveland, Ohio. ... The Moondog Coronation Ball was a concert held at the Cleveland Arena on March 21, 1952. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The Cleveland Cavaliers' mascot Moondog is named in honor of Freed. The Cleveland Cavaliers (also known as the Cavs) are a professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Moondog Moondog is the official mascot of the Cleveland Cavaliers basketball team of the NBA. Like a growing number of NBA Mascots, the character has a unique connection not just to the team, but to city or area. ...


The original Moondog was an experimental street musician from New York City. Moondog the nom de plume of Louis T. Hardin (May 26, 1916 – September 8, 1999), was a composer, musician and poet, who also invented musical instruments - all this despite being blind, and, for three decades, homeless. ...


1010 WINS New York

Following his success on the air in Cleveland, Alan Freed moved to New York City where he turned WINS into a rock and roll radio station. New York, NY redirects here. ... WINS (AM), known on-air as 1010 WINS, is an all-news radio station in New York City at 1010 kHz, owned by CBS Radio (formerly Infinity Broadcasting). ...


Radio Luxembourg

In 1956 Alan Freed was introduced to European audiences by his appearances in a succession of rock 'n' roll movies such as Rock Around The Clock, Don't Knock the Rock and other titles. That same year and while working for WINS in New York City, Alan Freed began recording a weekly half-hour segment of the Radio Luxembourg show called Jamboree that was aired on Saturday nights at 9:30 PM. The billing of his segment in the 208 magazine programme guide described him as "the remarkable American disc-jockey whose programmes in the States cause excitement to the fever pitch.". A year later Dick Clark appeared in a rock 'n' roll movie of his own called Disc Jockey Jamboree when it was released in the United Kingdom. 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rock Around the Clock is a rock n roll song from 1952, written by Max C. Freedman and James E. Myers (the latter under the pseudonym Jimmy De Knight). Although first recorded by Sonny Dae & the Knights, the more famous version by Bill Haley & His Comets is not, strictly speaking... Dont Knock the Rock was a 1956 rock and roll film starring Alan Dale as a rock star who returns to his hometown to rest up for the summer only to find that rock and roll has been banned there by disapproving adults. ... WINS (AM), known on-air as 1010 WINS, is an all-news radio station in New York City at 1010 kHz, owned by CBS Radio (formerly Infinity Broadcasting). ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Radio Luxembourg is the name of a commercial radio station that has broadcast in many languages in conjunction with a television service operated from the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. ... For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ... Jamboree (known as Disc Jockey Jamboree in the United Kingdom) is the name of a black and white 1957 rock n roll motion picture directed by Roy Lockwood that runs for 71 minutes in mono RCA sound. ...


Jamboree with Alan Freed was heard throughout the British Isles and much of Europe via the powerful AM nighttime signal of Radio Luxembourg, and outside Europe by a similtaneous relay via transmission on shortwave. Due to the strange effect that the ionisphere had on the skywave signal of Radio Luxembourg, it was heard poorly in parts of southern England with extreme fading and like a local station in northern England cities such as Liverpool. The Beatles' founding members claim to have been influenced by African American artists such as Little Richard and Chuck Berry who were both promoted on Alan Freed's radio shows. The recordings made by these artists were in turn promoted on sponsored shows paid for by the record labels that were also heard over Radio Luxembourg, which was the only commercial radio station heard in the United Kingdom until 1964. This article is about the city in England. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926 in St. ...


Moves to WABC 770

After departing from WINS, Freed for a time was employed in New York by WABC 770 AM around 1958, about two years before it evolved into one of America's great Top 40 stations by launching its "Musicradio" format. At this time, WABC (unlike rocker WINS) was more of a full- service station which began implementing some music programming elements. Ironically, Freed was employed at the station around the same time as another famous pioneering disc jockey who arose during a different era: Martin Block (of WNEW 1130 AM - now WBBR - "Make Believe Ballroom" fame), toward the end of Block's legendary career. Freed was eventually fired by WABC (1959) during a dispute where he refused to sign a statement assuring that he had never accepted payola. WABC may refer to: WABC (AM) (770 kHz), also known as NewsTalkRadio 77, the flagship station of the ABC Radio Network, serving the New York metropolitan area WABC-FM (95. ... Martin Block (1901-1967) was the first radio disc jockey to become a star in his own right. ... WBBR is a radio station, broadcasting at 1130 AM in New York City. ...


Movies

Alan Freed also appeared in a number of major and historical rock and roll motion pictures during this period. These films were often welcomed with tremendous enthusiasm by teenagers because they brought visual depictions of their favorite American acts to the big screen, years before music videos would present the same sort of image on the small television screen. One side effect of these movies shown before mass audiences was that they sometimes presented an excuse for thugs to turn a fun event into a riot, in which cinemas in both West Germany and the United Kingdom were trashed.


Alan Freed appeared in several motion pictures that presented many of the big musical acts of his day:

Rock, Rock, Rock featuring Alan Freed, Chuck Berry, Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers, Johnny Burnette, La Vern Baker, The Flamingos, The Moonglows. [3]
Don't Knock the Rock featuring Alan Freed, Alan Dale, Little Richard and the Upsetters, Bill Haley and His Comets, The Treniers, Dave Appell and His Applejacks.

1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dancers Earl Barton and Lisa Gaye take the stage in Rock Around the Clock as Bill Haley and His Comets play in the background. ... The original members of Bill Haley and His Comets, c. ... The Platters was a successful vocal group of the early rock and roll era. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Now widely considered Chuck Berrys first album [1], Rock, Rock, Rock (Chess LP-1425) was originally marketed as a soundtrack album for the motion picture of the same name, which was not true. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926 in St. ... Frankie Lymon (September 30, 1942 – February 27, 1968) was an African-American rock and roll//R&B singer, best known as the boy soprano lead singer of a New York City-based early rock and roll group called The Teenagers. ... Johnny Burnette was a Rockabilly pioneer in Memphis, Tennessee and with his older brother Dorsey Burnette and a friend named Paul Burlison was one of the founder members of The Rock and Roll Trio. ... La Vern Baker (1929-1997) was an American R&B singer, famous for songs like Tweedlee Dee. ... The Flamingos 1957-1961: clockwise from top right: Terry Johnson, Nate Nelson, Zeke Carey, Tommy Hunt, Paul Wilson, Jake Carey. ... The Moonglows were an influental American R&B and doo wop group, featuring such legendary singers as Bobby Lester, Harvey Fuqua, Alexander Graves and Prentiss Barnes, along with guitarist Billy Johnson. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... Ferlin Husky (born December 3, 1925 in Flat River, Missouri) is an American singer who has become well-known as a country-pop chart-topper under various names, including Terry Preston and Simon Crum. ... Brooke Benton is an African-American singer. ... Clyde McPhatter (November 15, 1932 _ June 13, 1972) was an influential American R&B singer, born in Durham, North Carolina. ... Screamin Jay Hawkins Jalacy Hawkins, best known as Screamin Jay Hawkins (July 18, 1929 – February 12, 2000) was an African-American singer famed for his wildly theatrical performances of songs like I Put a Spell on You and Constipation Blues. // Some sources believe that Hawkins is the long-lost brother... Dont Knock the Rock was a 1956 rock and roll film starring Alan Dale as a rock star who returns to his hometown to rest up for the summer only to find that rock and roll has been banned there by disapproving adults. ... Alan Dale (July 9, 1926-April 20, 2002) was a singer of traditional popular and rocknroll music. ... Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... The Treniers (Cliff and Claude Trenier) played a cross between swing and early rock n roll. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jimmy Clanton, known as the swamp pop R&B teenage idol[1], and his band recorded a hit song Just A Dream which Clanton had written in 1958 for the Ace Records label. ...

Television

It was at the height of Freed's career at the beginning of his new television series that various individuals decided to use Alan Freed as a scapegoat for all that was wrong with the recorded music industry. His show called The Big Beat (which predated American Bandstand) on ABC was suddenly cancelled after an episode, in which Frankie Lymon of Frankie Lymon and The Teenagers was seen dancing with a white girl, offended the management of ABC's local affiliates in the Southern states. Into the void that had been created by the absence of Freed on TV, the career of Dick Clark began to take off.[citation needed] During this period, Freed was seen on other popular programs of the day, including To Tell The Truth, where he is seen defending the new "Rock and Roll" sound to the panelists whom were all clearly more comfortable with swing music:Polly Bergen, Ralph Bellamy, and Kitty Carlisle [Note: The re-broadcast of this particular episode of TTTT occurred on The Gameshow Network on February 4th or 5th, 2007, and also on April 23, 2007]. The Big Beat is a song from the popular musical, Over Here! which opened on Broadway at the Shubert Theatre (Broadway) on March 6, 1974. ... The American Broadcasting Company ( oftenly known as ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Frankie Lymon (September 30, 1942 – February 27, 1968) was an African-American rock and roll//R&B singer, best known as the boy soprano lead singer of a New York City-based early rock and roll group called The Teenagers. ... Dick Clark redirects here. ... Nipsey Russell, Peggy Cass, Bill Cullen and Kitty Carlisle from the 1969-78 version. ... Polly Bergen (born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actress, singer, and entrepreneur. ... Ralph Rexford Bellamy (June 17, 1904 – November 29, 1991) was a Tony Award-winning American actor with a career spanning sixty-two years. ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ...


Payola

In 1958, Freed faced controversy in Boston, when he told the audience, "The police don't want you to have fun", as a result, Freed was arrested and charged for inciting to riot. The career of Alan Freed ended when accusations were made that he had accepted payola – that is, taken bribes to play specific records. He had also taken songwriting co-credits (most notably on Chuck Berry's Maybellene). This entitled him to receive part of a song's royalties, which he could help increase by heavily promoting the record on his own popular radio show. It has been suggested that Pay to Play#In Music be merged into this article or section. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926 in St. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Berry (born October 18, 1926), better known as Chuck Berry, is an American guitarist, singer and composer. ...


Although these practices were not unique to him, he was singled out for attention. Freed lost his own show on radio station WINS, then he was fired from the station altogether. In 1960 payola was made illegal, although this by no means stopped the practice which continues in various forms to this day. In 1962 Alan Freed pled guilty to two charges of commercial bribery for which he received a fine and a suspended sentence. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ...


Death

Although the punishment handed down to Alan Freed was not severe, the side effects of negative publicity were such that no prestigious station would employ him, and he moved to the West Coast in 1960, where he worked at KDAY-AM in Santa Monica, California. In 1962, after KDAY refused to allow him to promote rock 'n roll stage shows, Freed moved to WQAM in Miami, Florida, but that association lasted only two months. He died in a Palm Springs, California hospital in 1965 at the age of 43 suffering from uremia and liver cirrhosis, which was brought on by alcoholism. Shortly before this he had begun working at a radio station in Palm Springs, California. He was initially interred in the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York, and his ashes were later moved to their present location in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 21, 2002. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica is a coastal city located in Los Angeles County, California USA, by the Pacific Ocean, south of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, west of Westwood, Los Angeles, and north of Venice. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... WQAM is a South Florida radio station. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Palm Springs is a famed Riverside County, California, desert resort city, approximately 110 miles east of Los Angeles. ... Uremia is a toxic condition resulting from renal failure, when kidney function is compromised and urea, a waste product normally excreted in the urine, is retained in the blood. ... Cirrhosis is a chronic disease of the liver in which liver tissue is replaced by connective tissue, resulting in the loss of liver function. ... Palm Springs is a famed Riverside County, California, desert resort city, approximately 110 miles east of Los Angeles. ... Founded in 1903, the non-sectarian Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located on Secor Road in the hamlet of Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles north of New York City. ... Hartsdale is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ...


Legacy

In 1978 a motion picture entitled American Hot Wax was released, inspired by Freed's contribution to the rock and roll scene, leading up to a concert that was held in New York City in 1959. Although director Floyd Mutrux created a fictionalised account of Freed's last days in New York radio by utilising real-life elements outside of their actual chronology, the film does accurately convey the fond relationship between Freed, the musicians he played and the audiences who listened to them. Several notable personalities starred in the movie, who would later become well-known celebrities, including Jay Leno and Fran Drescher, and there were even cameo appearances by Chuck Berry, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Frankie Ford and Jerry Lee Lewis, performing in the recording studio and concert sequences. 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... American Hot Wax is a 1978 biopic film telling the story of disc jockey Alan Freed who was instrumental in introducing and popularizing rock n roll in the 1950s. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jay Leno (born James Douglas Muir Leno April 28, 1950) is an Emmy-winning American comedian who is best known as the current host of NBC televisions long-running variety and talk program The Tonight Show. ... Francine Joy Drescher (born September 30, 1957) is an American film, television actress and an it girl. She is famous for her nasal voice, machine-gun laugh, and Queens accent. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926 in St. ... Screamin Jay Hawkins Jalacy Hawkins, best known as Screamin Jay Hawkins (July 18, 1929 – February 12, 2000) was an African-American singer famed for his wildly theatrical performances of songs like I Put a Spell on You and Constipation Blues. // Some sources believe that Hawkins is the long-lost brother... Frankie Ford (born date?) is a rock & roll and rhythm & blues singer. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ...


In 1986, he was part of the first group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which was built in Cleveland in recognition of Freed's involvement in the promotion of the genre. In 1988, he was also posthumously inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame and his pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // The National Radio Hall of Fame and Museum, located in the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago, Illinois, is a museum dedicated to recognizing those who have contributed to the development of the radio medium throughout its history in the United States. ... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ...


Freed appeared in Stephen King's Nightmares and Dreamscapes as a nightmarish version of himself, who enthusiastically announces the names of deceased rock n roll legends in You Know They Got a Hell of a Band as part of an upcoming concert to perform. He was portrayed by Mitchell Butel in the television adaptation on the Nightmares & Dreamscapes mini-series. STEPHEN KING HAS A JUICY SCROTUM YUMMY YUMMY ... Nightmares & Dreamscapes (1993) is a short story collection by Stephen King. ... You Know They Got a Hell of a Band is a short story by Stephen King. ... Nightmares and Dreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King is an eight-episode anthology on TNT based on short stories written by Stephen King. ...


References

  • Big Beat Heat: Alan Freed and the Early Years of Rock & Roll, by Jackson, John A. - Schirmer Books, 1991. ISBN 0-02-871155-6
  • The Pied Pipers of Rock 'N' Roll: Radio Deejays of the 50s and 60s, by Smith, Wes (Robert Weston). - Longstreet Press, 1989. ISBN 0-929264-69-X

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Alan Freed (991 words)
Disc jockey Alan Freed was born Albert James Freed on December 21, 1921 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania.
Alan Freed is often credited with coining the term "rock and roll" to describe the rhythm-and-blues records he played, however that expression had been around for years among the fl musicians of the day.
Freed claimed payments he'd received from record companies were for "consultation," not as an inducement to play their records.
Alan Freed (72 words)
Alan Freed (December 15, 1922 - January 20, 1965) was a United States DJ, most well-known today for the payola scandal that ended his career and revolutionized the radio industry.
Freed is often credited with coining the phrase "rock and roll", which is demonstrably false.
Freed is credited with producing the first rock and roll concert on March 21, 1952 in Cleveland, Ohio.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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