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Encyclopedia > Alameda, California
City of Alameda, California

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Nickname: The Island City[citation needed]
Location in the state of California and Alameda County
Location in the state of California and Alameda County
Coordinates: 37°45′50″N 122°15′25″W / 37.76389, -122.25694
Country United States
State California
County Alameda
Government
 - Mayor Beverly Johnson (D)
Area
 - Total 23.0 sq mi (59.5 km²)
 - Land 10.8 sq mi (28.0 km²)
 - Water 12.2 sq mi (31.5 km²)
Elevation 33 ft (10 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 72,259
 - Density 2,930.1/sq mi (1,131.3/km²)
Time zone PST (UTC−8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC−7)
ZIP codes 94501-94502
Area code(s) 510
FIPS code 06-00562
GNIS feature ID 0277468
Website: City of Alameda

Alameda is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. It is located on a small island of the same name next to Oakland, California in the San Francisco Bay. An additional part of the city is Bay Farm Island, which is adjacent to the Oakland International Airport. The city has a small-town feel with its Victorian homes and tree-lined neighborhoods. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 72,259. Alameda is a charter city, rather than a general law city, meaning that the city can provide for any form of government. Alameda became a charter city in 1916, and adopted a council-manager government then, which it retains to the present. Image File history File links Alameda_city_flag. ... Image File history File links Alamedaseal. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official website: http://www. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The U.S. state of California is divided into 58 counties. ... Official website: http://www. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Mayor Beverley Johnson (D-CA) Beverly Johnson is a California attorney and political leader, currently serving as the Mayor of Alameda, California. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Pacific Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... PDT is UTC-7 The Pacific Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-8). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... Map of California area codes in blue (and border states) with 510 in red North American area code 510 is a California telephone area code which covers eastern Bay Area cities such as Hayward, Castro Valley, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Alameda, Berkeley, Oakland, Piedmont, Richmond, San Pablo, Union City, and... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Official website: http://www. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Oakland redirects here. ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... Bay Farm Island is an area of the United States city of Alameda, California, near Oakland. ... Oakland International Airport (IATA: OAK, ICAO: KOAK, FAA LID: OAK), also known as Metropolitan Oakland International Airport, is an airport located 4 miles (6 km) south of downtown Oakland in Alameda County, California. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Incorporated town. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ...

Contents

History

The island which Alameda occupies was originally a peninsula connected to Oakland. Much of the peninsula was low-lying and marshy, but on the higher ground, the peninsula and adjacent part of what is now downtown Oakland were home to one of the largest coastal oak forests in the world and the area was therefore called "encinal", Spanish for "oak grove". "Alameda" is Spanish for "grove of poplar trees" or "tree-lined avenue",[1] This name was chosen in 1853 via popular vote.[2] and it too was once called Encinal, the name survives in one of the main north south trunk route streets on the island.[3]


The inhabitants at the time of the arrival of the Spanish in the late 18th Century were a local band of the Ohlone tribe. The peninsula became part of the vast Rancho San Antonio granted to Luis Peralta by the Spanish king who claimed California. The grant was later confirmed by the new Republic of Mexico upon its independence from Spain. Rancho San Antonio, also known as the Peralta Grant, was a 44,800-acre land grant by Governor Pablo Vicente de Solá, the last Spanish governor of California, to Don Luís María Peralta, a Spanish Army officer, in recognition of his forty years of service, on August 3...


Prior to the gold rush besides Native Americans there were also in modern Alameda French lumberjacks supplying lumber to the quickly expanding San Francisco and Chipman and Auginbaugh, as well as Mexican landowners who founded the village of Alameda near the corner of Encinal Avenue and High Street in Alameda.


The city was founded on June 6, 1853. Originally three small settlements grew in town. "Old Alameda" referred to the village at Encinal and High, Hibbardsville was at the North Shore ferry and shipping terminal, and Woodstock was on the west near the ferry piers of the South Pacific Coast Railroad and the Central Pacific. Eventually, the Central Pacific's ferry pier became the "Alameda Mole" while the Central Pacific itself became the Southern Pacific. The Alameda pier was the site of the first train across the Transcontinental Railroad into the San Francisco Bay Area on September 6, 1869. The transcontinental terminus was switched to the Oakland Long Wharf two months later on November 8, 1869. is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The South Pacific Coast Railroad was a narrow gauge steam railroad running between Santa Cruz, California and Alameda, with a ferry connection in Alameda to San Francisco. ... External link Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum Categories: Corporation stubs | Historical stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | California railroads | Nevada railroads | Utah railroads | Historic civil engineering landmarks ... A mole is a massive structure, usually of stone, used as a pier, breakwater, or junction between places separated by water. ... The Southern Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting marks SP) was an American railroad. ... A Transcontinental Railroad is a railway that crosses a continent typically from sea to sea. Terminals are at or connected to different oceans. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


In 1917, an attraction called Neptune Beach was built in the area now known as Crab Cove. Often compared to Coney Island, the park was a major attraction in the 1920s and 1930s. The original owners of the facilty, the Strehlow family, partnered with a local confectioner to create tastes unique to Neptune Beach. Though many do not know it, both the snow cone and the popsicle were invented at Neptune Beach. The Kewpie doll, handpainted and dressed in unique hand-sewn dresses, became the original prize for winning games at the beach - another Neptune Beach invention. The Strehlows owned and operated the beach on their own, even filling in a section of the bay to add an additional olympic-size swimming pool and an exceptional roller coaster which must have given riders a tremendous view of the bay. Neptune Beach is a city located in Duval County, Florida. ... For other uses, see Coney Island (disambiguation). ...


Neputune Beach's two huge outdoor pools hosted swimming races and exhibitions by famous swimmers like Olympian Johnny Weismuller, who later starred as the original Tarzan, and Jack LaLane, who started a chain of health clubs. Unfortunately, the park closed down in 1939 because of the Great Depression, the completion of the Bay Bridge, people circumventing paying the admission price and in general, the rise of car culture. Once the Bay Bridge was complete, the rail lines, which ran right past the entrance to Neptune Beach on the way to the Alameda Mole and the Ferry, lost riders in droves. People began using their cars to escape the city and the immediate suburbs like Alameda and travelling further afield in California. Alameda lost its resort status as more distant locations became more attractive to cash-rich San Francisco tourists. Youngsters in town became aware of ways to avoid paying the dime for admission to the park. Strong swimmers or even waders could sneak in on the bay side, just by swimming around the fence. Weissmuller, left (with actor George OBrien) Johnny Weissmuller (June 2, 1904 – January 20, 1984) was an Austrian-born American swimmer and actor. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Some of the resort homes and buildings from the Neptune beach era still exist in present-day Alameda. The Croll Building, on the corner of Webster St. and Central Ave., was the site of Croll's Gardens and Hotel, famous as training quarters for the some of the greatest fighters in boxing history from 1883 to 1914. James J. Corbett, Bob Fitzsimmons, Jim Jefferies, Jack Johnson, and many other champions all stayed and trained here. Today this beautiful preserved building is home to Croll's Pizza and the New Zealander Restaurant. Neptune Court, just a block away on the corner of Central Ave. and McKay Ave., provides another glimpse of what resort life was like in Alameda in the 1920s. A short walk near Crab Cove will reveal many more historic gems. The Croll Building, in Alameda, California, was the site of Crolls Gardens and Hotel, famous as training quarters for the some of the greatest fighters in boxing history from 1883 to 1914. ...


Sadly, the vast majority of the Neptune Beach structures - the hand-carved carousel from the world-famed Dentzel Company, the ferris wheel, the roller coaster, and other rides - were auctioned off in 1940 for mere pennies on the dollar of their original cost. Today, an Alameda resident Michael Schiess looks to preserve some of the historic artifacts from the Neptune Beach era at the Neptune Beach Amusement Museum,NBAM specifically dedicated to the resort and all "amusement machines." While the existing and more general Alameda Museum has quite a few artifacts from Neptune Beach in its collection, this new museum will focus more on the games, rides and other machines that brought amusement to Alameda's bay shore.


As the Neptune Beach era faded and Park Street developed into the major thoroughfare of the city and the location of the main Alameda train station, residents of Old Alameda pulled up stakes and moved across town to the new downtown. The street's location was chosen by two landowners who wished to attract tenants and development to their land. As a result they designated their mutual border as Park Street.


The need for expanded shipping facilities led to the dredging of a canal through the marshland between Oakland and Alameda in 1902, turning Alameda into an island. Most of the soil from the canal was used to fill in nearby marshland. The area of Alameda called Bay Farm Island is no longer an island, but is attached by fill to Oakland. In his youth, author Jack London was known to take part in oyster pirating in the highly productive oyster beds near Bay Farm Island, today long gone. The Alameda Works Shipyard was one of the largest and best equipped shipyards in the country. In the 1950s, Alameda's industrial and ship building industries thrived along the estuary, where the world's first-ever, land-based, containerized shipping crane was used. Today, the Port of Oakland across the estuary serves as one of the largest ports on the West Coast, using the shipping technologies originally experimented with in Alameda. As of March 21, 2006, Alameda is a "Coast Guard City," one of seven in the country.[4] The Alameda Works Shipyard, in Alameda, California, United States, was one of the largest and best equipped shipyards in the country. ... The Port of Oakland was the first major port on the Pacific Coast of the United States to build terminals for container ships. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In addition to the regular trains running to the Alameda Mole, Alameda was also served by local steam commuter lines of the Southern Pacific (initially, the Central Pacific) which were later transformed into the East Bay Electric Lines. Souther Pacific's electrified trains were not streetcars, but full-sized railroad cars which connected to the mainland by bridges at Webster Street and Fruitvale (only the latter bridge survives today). The trains ran to both the Oakland Mole and the Alameda Mole. In fact, one line which ran between the two moles was dubbed the "Horseshoe Line" for the shape of the route on a map. Soon after the completion of the Bay Bridge, Alameda trains ran directly to San Francisco on the lower deck of the bridge, the ferries having been rendered unnecessary. The East Bay Electric Lines was a division of the Southern Pacific Railroad which operated a system of electric interurban-type trains in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... The Oakland Long Wharf was a massive railroad wharf and ferry pier (mole) in Oakland, California. ... The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge ( ; known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a toll bridge which spans San Francisco Bay and links the California cities of Oakland and San Francisco in the United States, as part of Interstate 80. ...


In the 1930s Pan American Airways established a seaplane port along the fill that led to the Alameda Mole. This was the original home base for the famous China Clipper. With the advent of World War II, a vast stretch of the marshy area southwest of the Alameda Mole was filled and the Naval Air Station Alameda established. This major Naval facility included a large airfield as well as docks for several aircraft carriers. It closed in 1997. Pan American World Airways (Pan Am) was the United States principal international airline from the 1930s until its collapse in 1991, and was credited with many innovations that shaped the international airline industry. ... A DeHavilland Single Otter floatplane in Harbour Air livery. ... Martin model 130 China Clipper class passenger-carrying flying boat The China Clipper was a flying boat used by Pan American Airways for its San Francisco to Manila route. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Naval Air Station Alameda (NAS Alameda) was a United States Navy Naval Air Station in Alameda, California, on San Francisco Bay. ... Two aircraft carriers, USS (left), and HMS Illustrious (right), showing the difference in size between a supercarrier and a light V/STOL aircraft carrier. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 59.5 km² (23.0 mi²). 28.0 km² (10.8 mi²) of it is land and 31.5 km² (12.2 mi²) (52.98%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Today the city consists of the main original section, with the former Naval Air Station at the west end of Alameda Island, "Southshore" along the southern side of Alameda Island, and Bay Farm Island, which is part of the mainland proper. The area of the former NAS is now known as "Alameda Point." The Southshore area is separated from the main part of Alameda Island by a lagoon; the north shore of the lagoon is located approximately where the original south shore of the island was. Alameda Point and Southshore are built on artificial fill.


Not all of Alameda Island is part of the City of Alameda. Although nearly all of the island is in Alameda County, a small portion of the southwestern tip of Alameda Point lies west of the county line and is technically part of the City and County of San Francisco. This article is about the city in California. ...


Coast Guard Island which is a small island between Alameda Island and Oakland is also part of Alameda and is the home of Integrated Support Command Alameda[1] Coast Guard Island Rear Admiral Craig E. Bone, Commander 11th District, United States Coast Guard is based oat Coast Guard Island Vice Admiral Charles D. Wurster, Commander Pacific Area, United States Coast Guard is based at Coast Guard Island USCG 11th District emblem USCG Pacific area emblem Coast Guard Island... Integrated Support Command Alameda(ISC Alameda) is a large operating base of the United States Coast Guard, located on Coast Guard Island[1] in Alameda, California ISC Alameda provides a wide variety of services in direct support of Coast Guard activities throughout the west coast of the United States of...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 72,259 people, 30,226 households, and 17,863 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,583.3/km² (6,693.4/mi²). There were 31,644 housing units at an average density of 1,131.3/km² (2,931.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 56.95% White, 6.21% Black or African American, 0.67% Native American, 26.15% Asian, 0.60% Pacific Islander, 3.29% from other races, and 6.13% from two or more races. 9.31% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ...


There were 30,226 households out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 32.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 3.04. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 21.5% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.5 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $56,285, and the median income for a family was $68,625. Males had a median income of $49,174 versus $40,165 for females. The per capita income for the city was $30,982. About 6.0% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Politics

In the state legislature Alameda is located in the 9th Senate District, represented by Democrat Don Perata, and the 16th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Sandré Swanson. Federally, Alameda is located in California's 13th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of D +22[5] and is represented by Democrat Pete Stark. Stark received a 93% progressive rating from a self-described non-partisan group that provides a "searchable database of Congressional voting records from a Progressive perspective"[6], and an 8% conservative rating from a conservative group.[7] Californias Capitol, where the State Legislature meets California State Assembly chamber California state Senate chamber The California Legislature is the legislative branch of the state government of California. ... California State Senate chamber The California State Senate is the upper house of the California State Legislature. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Don Perata (born April 30, 1945) is a California Democratic politician, who is the current President Pro Tempore of the California State Senate. ... The California State Assembly chamber California State Assembly Chamber in the State Capitol The California State Assembly is the lower house of the California State Legislature. ... Sandré Swanson was elected to the California State Assembly in November 2006. ... California congressional districts since 2003. ... The Cook Partisan Voting Index indicates how much more Democratic or Republican a district performs compared to the nation as a whole. ... Stark delivers his response to President George W. Bushs 2005 State of the Union address. ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ...


Transportation

Vehicle access to the island is via three bridges to Oakland, a bridge to Bay Farm Island, and two one-way tunnels leading into Oakland's Chinatown. Bridges at Fruitvale Avenue, High Street, and Park Street, and the tunnels at Webster Street and Harrison Street (the latter called the Posey Tube) connect Alameda and Oakland. Public transportation includes the AC Transit buses (which include express buses to San Francisco) and two ferry services — the Alameda-Oakland Ferry and the Harbor Bay Ferry. Both ferry services may soon be transferred to the Water Transit Authority. The island is also close to the BART train service, with the closest stations being Lake Merritt, near the exit to the Posey Tube, and Fruitvale, near the Fruitvale Bridge. The Posey Tube is an underwater tunnel connecting the cities of Oakland and Alameda, California, running beneath the Alameda-Oakland Estuary. ... AC Transit (in full, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District) is a regional bus agency serving parts of Alameda County and Contra Costa County in the western coastal area of the East Bay of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Bart can refer to: A diminutive of Bartholomew Barts is the frequently used abbreviation for St Bartholomews Hospital in the City of London. ...


Even though the island is just minutes off Interstate 880, the speed limit for the city is 25 mph (40 km/h) on almost every road. Many unaware drivers fail to slow down after exiting the highway. Groups like Pedestrian Friendly Alameda and BikeAlameda advocate stronger enforcement of speeding laws. Alameda has a reputation for vigorous enforcement of the 25 mph speed limit.[8] Interstate 880 (abbreviated I-880) is an interstate highway in the San Francisco Bay Area. ...


Attractions

Victorian house in Alameda
Victorian house in Alameda

Due to its proximity to the Bay, wind surfers and kite surfers can often be seen along Crown Memorial State Beach and Shoreline Drive. From the beach there are also views of the San Francisco skyline and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Image File history File links Vichouse. ... Image File history File links Vichouse. ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing jibe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii, one of the popular destinations for windsurfing. ... Kiteboarders use inflatable kites tethered to harnesses to glide through water and air. ...


One of the recent attractions is the aircraft carrier USS Hornet, a museum ship now moored at the former Naval Air Station. This ship was originally named the USS Kearsarge, but was renamed in honor of the previous Hornet CV-8 (famous for the Doolittle raid), which was lost in October of 1942. Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and in most cases recover aircraft, acting as a sea... // The eighth USS Hornet (CV/CVA/CVS-12) was originally named USS Kearsarge, but renamed in honor of the CV-8, which was lost in October of 1942. ... USS Wisconsin, one of three Iowa class battleships opened to the public as a museum, and was one of two Iowas maintained in the US Mothball fleet. ... Combatants  United States  Japan Commanders James H. Doolittle Hideki Tojo Strength 16 B-25 Mitchells Unknown number of troops and homeland defense Casualties 3 dead, 8 POWs (4 died in captivity); 5 interned in USSR all 16 B-25s About 50 dead, 400 injured Lt. ...


Alameda is also known for its large stock of Victorian houses; 9% of all single-family houses (1500) in Alameda are Victorians, and many more have been divided into two to four-unit dwellings.[9] It is said that Alameda has more pre-1906 earthquake era homes than any other city in the Bay Area. Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ...


Economic development

The (old) Alameda Theater
The (old) Alameda Theater

The Naval Air Station Alameda was decommissioned and is in process of being turned over to the City of Alameda for civilian development. The area of the former NAS is now known as Alameda Point. Portions of this area are now in commercial use, but the transfer process has been slowed down by disputes between the Navy and the city regarding payment for environmental cleanup of the land. In late July of 2006, the City of Alameda announced a deal with Navy that would turn the land over to the city for $108M. The preliminary development concept calls for 1700 housing units to be developed at Alameda Point. In September, 2006, the developer, Alameda Point Community Partners, withdrew from development of Alameda Point. In May 2007 the City selected the SunCal Companies as the Master Developer of Alameda Point, and as of July 2007 the parties are negotiating terms for a development agreement. Image File history File links Alameda_Theater. ...


After two previous failures, voters in the city passed a ballot measure in 2000 authorizing a bond measure for construction of a new library to replace the city's Carnegie library, damaged during the Loma Prieta earthquake. The city also received state funds for the new library and opened the doors to the new facility in November of 2006. A bond measure is a proposal to sell bonds for the purpose of acquiring funds for various public works projects, such as research, transportation infrastructure improvements, and others. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake was a major earthquake that struck the San Francisco Bay Area of California on October 17, 1989 at 5:04 p. ...


Theaters

City officials continue to seek ways to spur economic development on the island, including the restoration of the historic Art Deco city landmark Alameda Theater. The theater restoration project is currently in progress, along with a multiplex to make the project financially feasible and a parking structure to accommodate patrons of the theater and avoid excessive impact on parking in the Park Street area. Asheville City Hall. ...


The South Shore Mall Twin Cinema opened in 1969 and served as a prominent theater on the island until it's closure in 1998. In 2002, the building was demolished and its former site still remains an empty lot in the Alameda Towne Centre (Formerly South Shore Center).


Alameda currently has only one running movie theater. Central Cinema, which opened in December of 2004, is a 42-seat house at 842 Central Avenue (near the western end of Webster Street). The building, which has been both a community center and a mortuary, is now home to this neighborhood movie house. Although it only has one screen, the theatre has a family atmosphere and is complete with an assortment of couches and armchairs.


Local newspapers

Alameda's first newspaper, the Encinal, appeared in the early 1850s and the paper's editor was instrumental in the movement to incorporate the city. Following the Encinal, several other papers appeared along geographic lines, and the Daily Argus would eventually rise to prominence. Around 1900 the Daily Argus began to fade in importance and east and west papers The Times and The Star combined to take the leading role as the Alameda Times-Star in the 1930s. Under the ownership of the Abe Kofman family, the Times-Star thrived until selling to the Alameda Newspaper Group (an out-of-town news corporation) in the 1970s. ANG Newspapers (Alameda Newspaper Group), based in Oakland, California, is a subisidary of the Denver, Colorado based MediaNews Group. ...


As a response to the lack of a local news source, Alameda realtors John Crittenden and John McNulty decided to combine their two publishing efforts into a new East End voice, Alameda Journal, in 1987. Crittenden had published a real estate homes list to real estate agents, while McNulty was known for the Island Journal, which focused on local news, history, humor and advertising. The new publication found itself the hometown paper of choice. It sold to the Hills Newspapers chain owned by Chip and Mary Brown. The Browns, Oakland residents, had assembled a chain of five East Bay weeklies and biweeklies: the biweekly Alameda Journal, The biweekly Montclarion (serving the Montclair district of Oakland), The Piedmonter (Piedmont), The Berkeley Voice, and The Albany/El Cerrito Journal.


In 1997, the Hills Newspaper chain was bought by Knight Ridder, at the time, the second-largest newspaper chain in the U.S. Following the buyout, former Hills Newspapers employees recognized the lack of a local community voice in Alameda, and again formed a new locally-based newspaper, the Alameda Sun, in 2001. In 2006 Knight Ridder announced its impending sale to McClatchy Corp., a Sacramento-based publishing firm. McClatchy Corp. has put the Contra Costa Times, which under the Knight Ridder reorganization included all five of the original Hills Newspapers, up for sale. The current owners of the Alameda Times-Star, MediaNews, Inc., based in Colorado, have announced a strong interest in buying both the Contra Costa Times chain and the San Jose Mercury News, consolidating the daily newspaper market of the East Bay, effectively under one owner. The California State Attorney General, as of June 2006, has been investigating the sale of the former Knight Ridder properties to MediaNews in the event of a potential breach of anti-trust laws. The upshot of the sale to MediaNews would be the original victor of Alameda's newspaper wars losing in the end, being bought out by the newspaper company once considered vanquished. Partial list of newspapers The following is a partial list of newspapers owned by Knight Ridder: Contra Costa Times Detroit Free Press Kansas City Star The Miami Herald Philadelphia Inquirer Saint Paul Pioneer Press San Jose Mercury News The State External link Knight Ridder corporate website Categories: Companies traded on... The McClatchy Company NYSE: MNI is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California, that operates a number of newspapers and websites. ... MediaNews Group, based in Denver, is one of the largest newspaper companies in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... The Mercs sections vary by day of the week, but Business, Sports, and The Valley are standard daily fare. ...


Alameda Power and Telecom

Unlike surrounding communities, Alameda has a municipal power and telecommunications service (Alameda Power and Telecom) that delivers services directly to consumers.


There have been proposals by the power producer to produce energy from waste, but not within the city of Alameda. Instead, this energy would be produced at a waste transfer station located in neighboring (and downwind) San Leandro. Owing to the expected release of toxic emissions from what is essentially a garbage incinerator, the mayor and city council of San Leandro rejected the proposal. The mayor vowed to fight this proposal, suggesting that Alameda could instead place it near their municipal golf course. San Leandro is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. ... Waste inside a wheelie bin Waste in a bin bag Waste, rubbish, trash, garbage, or junk is unwanted or undesired material. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Also, unlike the three major power producers in California, as a municipal utility, Alameda is not required to establish net metering for home photovoltaic power producers, so the city currently lags far behind other communities in producing "green" energy,[citation needed] even though they have a potentially productive site for supplemental wind energy on the western edge of the former naval air station. Net metering is a electricity policy for consumers who own, generally small, renewable energy facilities, such as wind or solar power, or uses vehicle-to-grid systems. ... A solar cell, a form of photovoltaic cell, is a device that uses the photoelectric effect to generate electricity from light, thus generating solar power (energy). ...


Arts and culture

The Alameda Arts Council (AAC) serves as the local Alameda City arts council. Alameda Arts Council logo The Alameda Arts Council (AAC) is the Alameda City arts council serving the arts in the Alameda area. ... The Arts Council of Great Britain was a Quango dedicated to the promotion of the fine arts in Britain. ...


Alameda Civic Ballet

The Alameda Civic Ballet and its affiliate school, the Alameda Ballet Academy, were founded in 2003 by former Oakland Ballet principal ballerina Abra Rudisill. Since their founding, both the academy and school have grown steadily, offering a full schedule of classes for dancers of all ages in downtown Alameda. Alameda Civic Ballet Logo The Alameda Civic Ballet (ACB) is the official dance company for Alameda, California, USA and was founded in February 2003 achieving non-profit 501(3) c status as a charitable organization in November of 2004. ...


Alameda Civic Light Opera

The Alameda Civic Light Opera, which performs Broadway-style musical productions. was founded in 1996. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ...


Shining Stars In The Arts

Held in May, Shining Stars In The Arts is an evening event that celebrates community members who have made an outstanding contribution in the arts in the city. It features a fundraising silent art auction, food, and music, and concludes in an award ceremony for the Shining Star honorees.


Sister cities

Since 2004 Alameda participates in a sister city agreement with Wuxi, China. Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Old Town and Canal Wuxi (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; former spellings: Wu-hsi, Wuhsi, or Wusih; lit. ...


Another sister city is Lidingö, Sweden. The initiative came from Alameda in 1959 and was part of President Eisenhower's people-to-people-movement, whose purpose was to develop better understanding among people from different countries after World War II. Both Alameda and Lidingö are islands with a bridge connecting them to a big city. Lidingö is a Municipality just east of Stockholm in central Sweden, with its main part located on the island Lidingö. It also consists of a few smaller islands in the surrounding, such as Fjäderholmarna, the nearest islands of the Stockholm archipelago. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... People to People International was first established in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. ...


Miscellaneous

Alameda High was renamed to Clearview High in the Animatrix episode: Kid's Story

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... James Earl Hyneman (born September 25, 1956), known as Jamie Hyneman, is an American visual effects expert, best known for being the co-host of the television series MythBusters on the Discovery Channel. ... MythBusters is an American popular science television program on the Discovery Channel starring special effects experts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who use basic elements of the scientific method to test the validity of various rumors and urban legends in popular culture. ... THX 1138 was George Lucas first full length movie. ... The Matrix Reloaded is the second installment of The Matrix series, written and directed by the Wachowski Brothers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Alameda_high_Animatrix. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Alameda_high_Animatrix. ... The Kid on the run from Agents. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Pavel Andreievich Chekov, Cyrillic: Павел Андрейевич Чеков), played by Walter Koenig, is a Russian Starfleet officer in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... The Bicentennial Man is a novella by Isaac Asimov. ... The Net may refer to: The internet The Net (film), a U.S. film starring Sandra Bullock The Net 2. ... Bee Season is a 2000 novel (ISBN 0385498799) by Myla Goldberg. ... Rent can refer to: Renting, a system of payment for the temporary use of something owned by someone else. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Wilver Dornell Willie Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed Pops in the later years of his career, was a professional baseball player who played his entire Major League career (1962-1982) with the Pittsburgh Pirates as an outfielder and first baseman. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... This article is about the sport. ... Tommy Harper (born October 14, 1940 in Oak Grove, Louisiana) is a former left fielder in Major League Baseball who played with the Cincinnati Reds (1962-67), Cleveland Indians (1968), Seattle Pilots (1969), Milwaukee Brewers (1970-71), Boston Red Sox (1972-74), California Angels (1975), Oakland Athletics (1975) and Baltimore... Curtell Howard Mottonn who was a baseball player was born on September 24, 1940 in Darnell, Louisiana. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... In Major League Baseball, the Rookie of the Year Award is given to the best first-year players in the American and National Leagues. ... Dontrelle Wayne Willis (born January 12, 1982, in Oakland, California), nicknamed The D-Train, is a Major League Baseball starting pitcher for the Florida Marlins. ... James Calvin Jimmy Rollins (born November 27, 1978 in Oakland, California), nicknamed J-Roll, is an All-Star and MVP Shortstop for the Philadelphia Phillies. ... NBA redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... Isaiah J.R. Rider (born March 12, 1971 in Oakland, California) is a former NBA basketball player, who played from 1993–2002. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Encinal High School is a public coeducational high school serving grades 9-12. ... Jason Deacon Kidd (born March 23, 1973) is an American All-Star professional basketball player in the NBA. After earlier stints with the Dallas Mavericks and Phoenix Suns, he is currently the New Jersey Nets starting point guard and captain. ... Skippy refers to more than one thing: Skippy was a comic strip by Percy Crosby which ran from 1923-45. ... The Animatrix is a collection of nine CG and anime shorts set in the world of The Matrix, partly written by the Wachowski brothers. ... Computer-generated imagery (commonly abbreviated as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... For the Marvel Comics character, see Flubber (comics). ... This article is about the film. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Bullet-time is a concept introduced in recent films and computer games whereby the passage of time is slowed down so that an observer can see individual bullets flying throughout the scene at a conceivable rate, usually with their trails made visible. ... General James Harold Jimmy Doolittle, Sc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist, writer, and movie producer. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Don Perata (born April 30, 1945) is a California Democratic politician, who is the current President Pro Tempore of the California State Senate. ... The Alameda Terminal of the First Transcontinental Railroad, located in Alameda, California, was the western terminus of the line. ... This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... John Harrington (born December 27, 1966) is an American photographer and author. ... MythBusters is an American popular science television program on the Discovery Channel starring special effects experts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who use basic elements of the scientific method to test the validity of various rumors and urban legends in popular culture. ... Charles Lee Tilden (1857-1950) was an attorney and businessman in the San Francisco Bay Area who served on the first Board of Directors of the East Bay Regional Park District. ... Looking northeast from Inspiration Point in Tilden, March 2006 Tilden Regional Park (also known simply as Tilden) is a regional park in the East Bay, part of the San Francisco Bay Area in the U.S. state of California. ... Dustin Perfetto, known by his stage name Nump, is a Filipino-American hip hop artist best known for his single, I Gott Grapes featuring E-40 and The Federation produced by D1 of the Knockaholicks. ...

Schools

Community College

College of Alameda is a two-year community college located in Alameda, California. ... The Peralta Community College District is the community college district serving northern Alameda County, California. ...

Private schools

St. ...

Public schools

Like almost all cities in California, the municipal government and the school administration are two separate entities. The Alameda Unified School District has the same boundaries as the City of Alameda, but has a separately elected board to oversee its operations, and its funding comes directly from the county and state governments without oversight by the city council. The AUSD educates approximately 10,000 students each year, in eight elementary schools, three middle schools, two traditional high schools, three alternative learning schools, one continuation school, and one high school within the College of Alameda. Most high school students attend Encinal High or Alameda High. The district also operates an Adult School and a Child Development Center. Two elementary schools were closed at the end of the 2005-2006 school year. However, a new elementary school, Ruby Bridges, opened for the 2006-2007 school year. The Alameda Unified School District serves the city of Alameda, USA. The school district is a unified district, meaning that it includes K-8 schools and high schools in the same jurisdiction. ... The Alameda Unified School District serves the city of Alameda, USA. The school district is a unified district, meaning that it includes K-8 schools and high schools in the same jurisdiction. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... The Alameda Community Learning Center (ACLC), formerly Arthur Andersen Community Learning Center, is a 6th-12th grade charter school located in Alameda, CA, sharing a campus with Encinal High School. ... Not to be confused with Continuing education. ... Encinal High School is a public coeducational high school serving grades 9-12. ... Alameda High School is a public coeducational high school serving grades 9-12. ... Ruby Bridges Hall (born Ruby Nell Bridges September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi) moved with her parents to New Orleans, Louisiana at the age of two. ...


See also

There are several islands in San Francisco Bay. ... Bay Farm Island is an area of the United States city of Alameda, California, near Oakland. ...

References

  1. ^ http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/spanish/alameda;_ylt=AmS17PW60RO5ki1NGlCOvxP2s8sF
  2. ^ http://www.ci.alameda.ca.us/community/history_01.html
  3. ^ Cite error 8; No text given.
  4. ^ http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4176/is_20060322/ai_n16140812
  5. ^ Will Gerrymandered Districts Stem the Wave of Voter Unrest?. Campaign Legal Center Blog. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  6. ^ Leading with the Left. Progressive Punch. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  7. ^ ACU Ratings of Congress, 2006. American Conservative Union (2006). Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  8. ^ http://www.speedtrap.org/speedtraps/ste.asp?state=CA&city=Alameda
  9. ^ http://www.eastbayexpress.com/bestof/award.php?oid=oid:18492&section=oid:17192&year=2002

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 37.763971° N 122.25681° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Alameda Real Estate | Alameda CA real estate | Alameda Realtors (440 words)
Alameda, a wonderful place to live it is an unique island community which is centrally located between Oakland and San Francsico, there are many parks with tree lined neighborhoods, many with Victorian and Queen Anne-style homes give a taste of the history of the region.
Alameda's compact geography, in addition to its bicycle and pedestrian-friendly amenities, encourages alternative transportation within Alameda.
So, Alameda County is not poor at all and ranks above 50 of the 58 counties in California where personal income is concerned, not to mention the average price of homes is higher than in other parts of the state.
Alameda, California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2939 words)
Alameda became a charter city in 1916, and adopted a council-manager government then, which it retains to the present.
Alameda is also known for its large stock of Victorian houses; 9% of all single-family houses (1500) in Alameda are Victorians, and many more have been divided into 2 to 4-unit dwellings.
Alameda's first newspaper, the Encinal, appeared on the scene in the early 1850s and the paper's editor was instrumental in the movement to incorporate the city.
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