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Encyclopedia > Al Sharpton
Al Sharpton

Born October 3, 1954 (1954-10-03) (age 53)
Brooklyn, New York
Residence New York City, New York
Occupation Baptist minister, civil rights/social justice activist, radio talk show host.
Religious beliefs Baptist
Spouse Kathy Jordan

Alfred Charles "Al" Sharpton Jr. (born October 3, 1954) is an American Baptist minister, political and civil rights/social justice activist, and radio talk show host.[1][2] In 2004, Sharpton was a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. presidential election. is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other types of... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... ABCUSA American Baptist Churches USA (ABCUSA) is a group of Baptist churches within the United States; headquartered in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other types of... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ...


Sharpton hosts his own radio talk show, Keepin’ It Real[3] and makes regular guest appearances on The O'Reilly Factor[4][5][6] and MSNBC. An example of The OReilly Factors Talking Points Memo The OReilly Factor is an American talk show on the Fox News Channel hosted by commentator Bill OReilly, who discusses current political and social issues with guests from opposing ends of the political spectrum. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ...


Sharpton's supporters praise "his ability and willingness to defy the power structure that is seen as the cause of their suffering"[7] and consider him "a man who is willing to tell it like it is".[7] Donna Wilson, host of a talk radio program on WWRL in New York City, said of him that "Al Sharpton was born to lead".[7] Former New York Mayor Ed Koch, a one-time foe, said that Sharpton deserves the respect he enjoys among African-Americans: "He is willing to go to jail for them, and he is there when they need him."[8] For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... WWRL is a radio station in New York City, broadcasting at 1600 kHz AM owned by Access. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Edward Irving Koch (born December 12, 1924; pronounced ) was a United States Congressman from 1969 to 1977 and the Mayor of New York City from 1978 to 1989. ...


Sharpton's critics describe him as "a political radical who is to blame, in part, for the deterioration of race relations".[9] Conservative writer and activist David Horowitz has called Sharpton an "anti-Semitic racist",[10] sociologist Orlando Patterson has referred to him as a racial arsonist,[10] and liberal newspaper columnist Derrick Z. Jackson has called him the black equivalent of Richard Nixon and Pat Robertson.[10] Look up Radical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... For other persons named David Horowitz, see David Horowitz (disambiguation). ... Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism, also known as judeophobia) is prejudice and hostility toward Jews as a religious, racial, or ethnic group. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... Orlando Patterson is a preeminent Jamaican sociologist at Harvard University who is recognized for his many scholarly contributions to his study on ethnicity primarily of those people of African descent and is one of the most cited modern writers in his field. ... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... Derrick Zane Jackson (b. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ...


Sharpton sees much of the criticism as a sign of his effectiveness. "In many ways, what they consider criticism is complimenting my job," said Sharpton. "An activist’s job is to make public civil rights issues until there can be a climate for change. So when people get angry at me for raising these issues and making them public, well, that’s my job! That’s what I’m supposed to do. If I could not get the public’s attention on an issue, then I’m not a good activist."[11]

Contents

Personal and religious life

What I do functionally is what Dr. King, Reverend Jackson and the movement are all about; but I learned manhood from James Brown. I always say that James Brown taught me how to be a man.

—Sharpton on Brown as a father figure., [11] For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ...

Alfred Charles Sharpton Jr. was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Alfred Charles Sharpton, Sr. and Ada Sharpton.[12] He preached his first sermon at the age of four and toured with gospel singer Mahalia Jackson.[13] This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A sermon is an oration by... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Mahalia Jackson (October 26, 1911[1] – January 27, 1972) was an American Grammy Award-winning gospel singer, widely regarded as the best in the history of the genre and is the first Queen of Gospel Music. Mahalia Jackson became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world. ...


In 1963, Sharpton's father abandoned his family. Ada Sharpton took a job as a maid, but her income was so low that the family qualified for welfare and had to move from middle class Hollis, Queens, to the public housing projects in the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn.[14] This article is about financial assistance paid by government organizations. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... Hollis is a neighborhood within the southeastern section of the New York City borough of Queens. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes are forms of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Brownsville is a neighborhood in central Brooklyn, New York, predominantly Caribbean, Hispanic, and African-American. ...


Sharpton graduated from Samuel J. Tilden High School in Brooklyn, and attended Brooklyn College, dropping out after two years in 1975.[15] He became a tour manager for James Brown in 1971, where he met his future wife, Kathy Jordan, who was a backup singer.[16] Sharpton and Jordan married in 1980.[17] The couple separated in 2004.[18] Samuel J. Tilden High School, is a New York City public high school. ... Brooklyn College is a senior college of the City University of New York, located in Brooklyn, New York. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...


Sharpton was licensed and ordained a Pentecostal minister at the age of nine by Bishop F.D. Washington.[19] After Bishop Washington's death in the late 1980s, Sharpton became a Baptist; he was re-baptized as a member of the Bethany Baptist Church in 1994 by the Reverend William Jones[20] and became a Baptist minister.[21][19] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... Bishop F.D. Washington was a renowned Pentacostal minister of Brooklyn, New Yorks Washington Temple Church of God in Christ. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Reverend William Augustus Jones Jr. ...


During 2007, Sharpton participated in a public debate with atheist Christopher Hitchens, during which Sharpton defended his religious faith and his belief in the existence of God.[22] For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more divinities or deities. ...


Assassination attempt

On January 12, 1991, Sharpton escaped serious injury when he was stabbed in the chest by Michael Riccardi while Sharpton was preparing to lead a protest through Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York. The intoxicated attacker was apprehended by Sharpton's aides and handed over to police who were present for the planned protest. Sharpton, although forgiving his attacker and pleading for leniency on his behalf, filed suit against New York City alleging that the many police present had failed to protect him from his attacker. In December 2003 he finally reached a $200,000 settlement[23] with the city just as jury selection was about to start. is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Michael Riccardi attempted to assassinate Civil Rights Activist Reverend Al Sharpton on January 12, 1991. ... Bensonhurst Embankment is a common walkway in Bensonhurst Bensonhurst is a neighborhood located in the south-central part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... This article is about the state. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Indirect link to Strom Thurmond

In February 2007, genealogists using the website Ancestry.com discovered that Sharpton's great-grandfather, Coleman Sharpton, was a slave owned by Julia Thurmond, whose grandfather was Strom Thurmond's great-great-grandfather. Coleman Sharpton was later freed during the Civil War. February 2007 is the second month of the year. ... Genealogy (from Greek: γενεα, genea, family; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... Ancestry. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Thurmond was notable as the longest serving Senator (at the time of his death) who was a major advocate of racial segregation during the middle of the last century.[24] Thurmond's illegitimate daughter, Essie Mae Washington-Williams, stated she would welcome Sharpton to the family if a DNA test shows he is a relative.[25] In an interview, Sharpton said he has no plans for the DNA test to see if he is related.[11] Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... Essie Mae Washington-Williams (born on October 12, 1925) is the oldest known daughter of the United States Senator Strom Thurmond. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ...


The Sharpton family name originated with Coleman Sharpton's previous slave-owner, who was named Alexander Sharpton.[26]


Activism

In 1969, Sharpton was appointed by Jesse Jackson as youth director of Operation Breadbasket, a group that focused on the promotion of new and better jobs for African-Americans.[27] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... Operation Breadbasket is an organization dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States of America. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


In 1971, Sharpton founded the National Youth Movement to raise resources for impoverished youth.[28] National Youth Movement was established in 1971, by Reverand Al Sharpton at the age of 16 years old. ...


Howard Beach

On December 20, 1986, three African-American men were assaulted in the Howard Beach neighborhood of Queens by a mob of white men. The three men were chased by their attackers onto the Belt Parkway, where one of them, Michael Griffith, was struck and killed by a passing motorist.[29] is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Howard Beach is a neighborhood in the southwestern portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The Belt Parkway, or Belt System or Circumferential Parkway is a series of New York City limited-access highways that form a complete circle around the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. ... Michael Griffith (1963 – 1986) was a 23-year old man born in Trinidad and lived in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, who was killed after being hit by a car in Howard Beach, Queens, New York, on December 20, 1986. ...


A week later, on December 27, Sharpton led 1,200 demonstrators on a march through the streets of Howard Beach. Residents of the neighborhood, who were overwhelmingly white, screamed racial epithets at the protesters, who were largely black.[30] Sharpton's role in the case, which led to the appointment of a special prosecutor by New York Governor Mario Cuomo after the two surviving victims refused to co-operate with the Queens district attorney, helped propel him to national prominence. December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For other uses, see Demonstration. ... // Nigger is a racial slur used to refer to dark-skinned people, especially those of African ancestry. ... A special prosecutor is a lawyer from outside the government appointed by the attorney general or Congress to investigate a federal official for misconduct while in office. ... This article is about the state. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ...


Tawana Brawley controversy

For more details on this topic, see Tawana Brawley.
Al Sharpton interviewed in 2007 on whether he is tired of hearing about Tawana Brawley twenty years later.
Al Sharpton interviewed in 2007 on whether he is tired of hearing about Tawana Brawley twenty years later.

On November 28, 1987, Tawana Brawley, a 15-year-old black girl, was found smeared with feces, lying in a garbage bag, her clothing torn and burned and with various slurs and epithets written on her body in charcoal. Brawley claimed she had been assaulted and raped by six white men, some of them police officers, in the village of Wappingers Falls, New York. Tawana Brawley at a press conference in 1987 Tawana Brawley (born 1972) is an African-American woman who, at the age of 15, received national media attention in the US for her claim that she was raped by six white men, some of them police officers, in the village of... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Tawana Brawley at a press conference in 1987 Tawana Brawley (born 1972) is an African-American woman who, at the age of 15, received national media attention in the US for her claim that she was raped by six white men, some of them police officers, in the village of... Horse feces Feces, faeces, or fæces (see spelling differences) is a waste product from an animals digestive tract expelled through the anus (or cloaca) during defecation. ... Village Hall, the former post office listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Attorneys Alton H. Maddox and C. Vernon Mason joined Sharpton in support of Brawley. A grand jury was convened; after seven months of examining police and medical records, the jury determined that Brawley had fabricated her story. Sharpton, Maddox, and Mason accused the Dutchess County prosecutor, Steven Pagones, of racism and of being one of the perpetrators of the alleged abduction and rape. The three were successfully sued for slander and ordered to pay $345,000 in damages, the jury finding Sharpton liable for making seven defamatory statements about Pagones, Maddox for two, and Mason for one.[31] Alton H. Maddox is a lawyer who was disbarred following his involvement in the Tawana Brawley alleged hoax. ... C. Vernon Mason was born in Tucker, Arkansas. ... In the American common law legal system, a grand jury is a type of jury which determines if there is enough evidence for a trial. ... Dutchess County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Steven Pagones was an Assistant District Attorney in New York who was falsely accused in 1987 by Tawana Brawley and Al Sharpton of raping Brawley. ...


In 2007 Sharpton said he would have accepted the case the same as he does today. The only difference would be he would not have made it so personal with Pagones, but he still felt Brawley had a good case to go to trial. "I disagreed with the grand jury on Brawley," said Sharpton in an interview. "I believed there was enough evidence to go to trial. Grand jury said there wasn’t. Okay, fine. Do I have a right to disagree with the grand jury? Many Americans believe O.J. Simpson was guilty. A jury said he wasn’t. So I have as much right to question a jury as they do. Does it make somebody a racist? No! They just disagreed with the jury. So did I." [11] The O.J. Simpson murder case was a highly-publicized U.S. criminal trial in which former American football star for the National Football League (NFL) and actor O. J. Simpson was charged with the murder of his ex-wife and her friend, Ronald Goldman. ...


Bensonhurst

On August 23, 1989, four black teenagers were beaten by a group of 10 to 30 white youths in Bensonhurst, a Brooklyn neighborhood. One Bensonhurst resident, armed with a handgun, shot and killed sixteen-year-old Yusef Hawkins. {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Bensonhurst Embankment is a common walkway in Bensonhurst Bensonhurst is a neighborhood located in the south-central part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... Yusef Hawkins (also spelled as Yusuf Hawkins) was a 16-year-old African American who was killed by a white youth, on August 23, 1989, in Bensonhurst, a largely Italian American neighborhood in the new York City borough of Brooklyn. ...


In the weeks following the assault and murder, Sharpton led several marches through Bensonhurst. The first protest, just days after the incident, was greeted by neighborhood residents shouting "Niggers go home" and holding watermelons to mock the demonstrators.[32]


In May 1990, when one of the two leaders of the mob was acquitted of the most serious charges brought against him, Sharpton led another protest through Bensonhurst. In January 1991, when other members of the gang were given light sentences, Sharpton planned another march for January 12, 1991. Before that demonstration began, neighborhood resident Michael Riccardi tried to kill Sharpton by stabbing him in the chest.[33] Sharpton recovered from his wounds, and later asked the judge for leniency when Riccardi was sentenced.[34] is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Michael Riccardi attempted to assassinate Civil Rights Activist Reverend Al Sharpton on January 12, 1991. ...


National Action Network

Al Sharpton at National Action Network's headquarters.
Al Sharpton at National Action Network's headquarters.

In 1991, Sharpton founded the National Action Network to increase voter education, poverty services, and support small community businesses.[20] The National Action Network (NAN) is a charitable organization founded by the Reverend Al Sharpton and a group of political and human rights activists in New York City, New York in early 1991. ... A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ...


Crown Heights Riot

For more details on this topic, see Crown Heights Riot.

The Crown Heights Riot began on August 19, 1991, after a car driven by a Jewish man, and part of a procession led by an unmarked police car, went through an intersection and was struck by another vehicle causing it to veer onto the sidewalk where it accidentally struck and killed a seven-year-old Guyanese boy named Gavin Cato and severely injured his cousin Angela. Witnesses could not agree upon the speed and could not agree whether the light was yellow or red. One of the factors that sparked the riot was the arrival of a private ambulance which, on the orders of a police officer worried for the Jewish driver's safety, removed the uninjured driver from the scene while Cato lay pinned under his car.[35] Cato and his cousin were treated soon after by a city ambulance. Caribbean-American and African-American residents of the neighborhood rioted for four consecutive days fueled by rumors that the private ambulance had refused to treat Cato.[35][36] During the riot blacks looted stores,[35] beat Jews in the street,[35] and clashed with groups of Jews, hurling rocks and bottles at one another [37] after Yankel Rosenbaum, a visiting student from Australia, was stabbed and killed by a member of a mob shouting "Kill the Jew."[38] Sharpton, who arranged a rally in Crown Heights after Cato's death,[35] has been seen by some commentators as inflaming tensions by making remarks that included "If the Jews want to get it on, tell them to pin their yarmulkes back and come over to my house"[39] and referring to Jews as "diamond merchants."[40] The Crown Heights Riot was a three-day riot in the Crown Heights neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... The Crown Heights Riot was a three-day riot in the Crown Heights neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Gavin Cato (circa 1984–August 19, 1991) was an American child of Guyanese descent who was killed by a car driven by a Jewish driver, sparking the Crown Heights Riot. ...


Sharpton marched through Crown Heights and in front of "770", shortly after the riot, with about 400 protesters (who chanted "Whose streets? Our streets!" and "No justice, no peace!"), in spite of Mayor David Dinkins's attempts to keep the march from happening.[41] Lubavitch world headquarters, 770 Eastern Parkway 770 Eastern Parkway, commonly abbreviated to 770 or Seven-seventy is the street address of the central headquarters of the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement, located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York in the United States of America. ... David Norman Dinkins (born July 10, 1927 in Trenton, New Jersey) was the Mayor of New York City from 1990 through 1993, being the first and to date only African American to hold that office. ...


Freddie's Fashion Mart

In 1995, a black Pentecostal Church, the United House of Prayer, which owned a retail property on 125th Street, asked Fred Harari, a Jewish tenant who operated Freddie's Fashion Mart, to evict his longtime subtenant, a black-owned record store called The Record Shack. Sharpton led a protest in Harlem against the planned eviction of The Record Shack.[42][43][44] Sharpton told the protesters, "We will not stand by and allow them to move this brother so that some white interloper can expand his business."[45] On 1995-12-08, Roland J. Smith Jr., one of the protesters, entered Harari's store with a gun and flammable liquid, shot several customers and set the store on fire. The gunman fatally shot himself, and seven store employees died of smoke inhalation.[46][47] Fire Department officials discovered that the store's sprinkler had been shut down, in violation of the local fire code.[48] Sharpton claimed that the perpetrator was an open critic of himself and his nonviolent tactics. Sharpton later expressed regret for making the racial remark, "white interloper," and denied responsibility for inflaming or provoking the violence.[13][49] Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 125th Street between Park Avenue and Madison Avenue Christmas shopping on 125th Street 125th Street is a two-way street that runs east-west in the New York City borough of Manhattan, considered the Main Street of Harlem; It is also called Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Amadou Diallo

In 1999, Sharpton led a protest to raise awareness about the death of Amadou Diallo, an immigrant from Guinea who was shot to death by NYPD officers. Sharpton claimed that Diallo's death was the result of police brutality and racial profiling. Diallo's family was later awarded $3 million in a wrongful death suit filed against the city.[50] Amadou Diallo Amadou Bailo Diallo (September 2, 1975 – February 4, 1999) was a 23-year-old immigrant to the United States from Guinea, who was shot and killed on February 4, 1999, by four New York City Police Department plain-clothed officers; Sean Carroll, Richard Murphy, Edward McMellon and Kenneth... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... January 31 1919: David Kirkwood on the ground after being struck by batons of the Glasgow police Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers and other law enforcement officers. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity...


Vieques

For more details on this topic, see Navy-Vieques protests.

In 2001, Sharpton was jailed for 90 days for protesting near a United States Navy bombing site in Puerto Rico.[51] The Navy-Vieques protests is the name given by English-speaking media to a series of protests starting in 1999 on the Puerto Rican island-municipality of Vieques, against the United States Navy and Marine Corps (USMC) use of the island for bombing target practices. ...


Ousmane Zongo

In 2002, Sharpton was involved in protests following the death of West African immigrant Ousmane Zongo. Zongo, who was unarmed, was shot by an undercover police officer during a raid on a warehouse in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan. Sharpton met with the family and also provided some legal services.[52] Ousmane Zongo (1960-May 22, 2003) in Burkina Faso) was an African arts trader from Burkina Faso living in New York City. ... Chelsea is located on the West Side of Manhattan, New York City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Duke lacrosse players

For more details on this topic, see 2006 Duke University lacrosse case.
The thing that gets me is, you get blamed for stuff you did not do. A lot of people think I led the Duke case. I never went to Duke; I never went to North Carolina. Never ever. They asked me to come, but I said unless I talk to the victim I’m not going. So you get criticized for what you do organize and lead, and you get criticized for stuff you had nothing to do with, just because people assume you were there. And it’s crazy!

—Sharpton on his lack of involvement in the case[11] The 2006 Duke University lacrosse case was a scandal that started in March 2006 when Crystal Gail Mangum,[1][2][3] a stripper and escort, and an African-American student at North Carolina Central University, falsely accused three white members of Duke Universitys mens lacrosse team[4] of...

In April 2006, Sharpton was invited on Fox's The O'Reilly Factor to discuss the case of three white Duke University lacrosse players who had been accused of raping an African American woman who was hired as a stripper at an off-campus party.[53] In response to Bill O'Reilly's questions concerning the possibility that the woman might have fabricated the allegations, Sharpton said, "First of all, the authorities have charged there was a crime. ... When the prosecutors went forward, they clearly have said this girl is the victim, so why would we be trying the victim?" When O'Reilly mentioned recent news reports that DNA testing had failed to match any of the defendants, Sharpton said, "I think that all of the facts that you have laid out the DA had — and I know this DA is probably not one that is crazy. He would not have proceeded if he did not feel that he could convict." Later, when O'Reilly said that Sharpton didn't know what happened, Sharpton agreed. "I don't know yet and I think that the proper thing to do is to support those that want justice."[53] An example of The OReilly Factors Talking Points Memo The OReilly Factor is an American talk show on the Fox News Channel hosted by commentator Bill OReilly, who discusses current political and social issues with guests from opposing ends of the political spectrum. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ...


In January 2007, prosecutor Michael Nifong withdrew from the case after ethics charges related to his conduct in the case were brought against him.[54] The North Carolina Attorney General, who replaced him, dropped charges against the accused players in April 2007 and declared that they were innocent, in light of inconsistencies in the accuser's accounts of events and the lack of any evidence supporting her claims.[55] http://upload. ...


On October 9, 2007, Whoopi Goldberg suggested on her television show, The View, that Sharpton owed the lacrosse players an apology. The following day she read a letter from Sharpton in which he said that he "never took a position on the case" and that "the only statement [he] made was that 'We can only assume the DA knows what he is doing'".[56] is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Whoopi Goldberg (born November 13, 1955) is an American actress, comedian, radio presenter, host, and author. ... This article is about the talk show. ...


Sean Bell

For more details on this topic, see Sean Bell shooting incident.

On November 25, 2006, Sean Bell was shot and killed in the Jamaica section of Queens in New York City by plainclothes detectives from the New York Police Department in a hail of 50 bullets. The incident sparked fierce criticism of the police from the public and drew comparisons to the 1999 killing of Amadou Diallo. Three of the five detectives involved in the shooting went to trial in 2008 on charges ranging from manslaughter to reckless endangerment but were found not guilty. is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Amadou Diallo Amadou Bailo Diallo (September 2, 1975 – February 4, 1999) was a 23-year-old immigrant to the United States from Guinea, who was shot and killed on February 4, 1999, by four New York City Police Department plain-clothed officers; Sean Carroll, Richard Murphy, Edward McMellon and Kenneth...


On May 7, 2008, in response to the acquittals of the officers, Sharpton co-ordinated peaceful protests at major transportation centers in New York City, including the Brooklyn Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, the Triborough Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge, the Holland Tunnel, and the Queens-Midtown Tunnel. Sharpton and about 200 others were arrested.[57] is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... The Queensboro Bridge, also known as the 59th Street Bridge, is a cantilever bridge over the East River in New York City. ... The Triborough Bridge is a complex of three bridges connecting the New York City boroughs of the Bronx, Manhattan, and Queens, using what were two islands, Wards Island and Randalls Island as intermediate rights-of-way between the water crossings. ... The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan (at Canal Street) with Brooklyn (at Flatbush Avenue Extension). ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ... The Queens Midtown Tunnel is a toll road in New York City crosses under the East River and connects the Borough of Queens at Long Island City terminus of I-495 with the Borough of Manhattan between the major crosstown thoroughfares of 34th and 42nd Streets in the Midtown Manhattan...


Dunbar Village

On March 11, 2007, Sharpton held a press conference to highlight what he said was unequal treatment of four suspected rapists in a high-profile crime in the Dunbar Village Housing Projects in West Palm Beach, Florida. The suspects, who were young black men, were arrested for allegedly raping and beating a black Haitian woman. The crime also involved forcing the woman to perform oral sex on her 12-year-old son.[58] is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Nickname: Location in Palm Beach County and the state of Florida. ...


At his press conference Sharpton said that any violent act toward a woman is inexcusable but he felt that the accused youths were being treated unfairly because they were black. Sharpton contrasted the treatment of the suspects, who remain in jail, with white suspects involved in a gang rape who were released after posting bond.[58]


Political views

2008 presidential race

As of January 2008, Sharpton had not endorsed a candidate in the 2008 presidential campaign. Both Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have asked Sharpton for campaign advice, and each has reportedly asked for his endorsement.[59] The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


In September 2007, when he was asked whether he thought it was important for America to have a black president, Sharpton said, "It would be a great moment as long as the black candidate was supporting the interest that would inevitably help our people. A lot of my friends went with Clarence Thomas and regret it to this day. I don't assume that just because somebody's my color, they're my kind. But I'm warming up to Obama, but I'm not there yet."[60]


Gay rights

Sharpton is a supporter of equal rights for gays and lesbians, including same-sex marriage. During his presidential campaign in 2003, Sharpton said he thought it was insulting to be asked to discuss the issue of gay marriage. "It's like asking do I support black marriage or white marriage... The inference of the question is that gays are not like other human beings."[61] GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... Recognized in some regions United States (MA) Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Argentina (C, R, VCP) Australia (TAS, VIC eff. ...


Sharpton is leading a grassroots movement to eliminate homophobia within the Black church.[62] A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church, a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... The term black church or African American church refers to predominantly African American Christian churches that minister to black communities in the United States. ...


Animal rights

Sharpton has also spoken out against cruelty to animals in a video recorded for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).[63] Cruelty to animals refers to the treatment or standards of care that cause unwarranted or unnecessary suffering or harm to animals. ... People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals logo People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is an animal rights organization based in the United States. ...


Accusations of racism, homophobia, and bigotry

Sharpton was quoted as saying to an audience at Kean College in 1994 that, “White folks was in caves while we was building empires ... We taught philosophy and astrology and mathematics before Socrates and them Greek homos ever got around to it.”[64] Sharpton defended his comments by noting that the term “homo” was not homophobic but added that he no longer uses the term.[65] Sharpton has since called for an end to perceived homophobia in the African-American community.[66]


During 2007, Sharpton was accused of bigotry for comments he made on May 7, 2007, concerning presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his religion, Mormonism: is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... For more general information about religious denominations that follow the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ...

"As for the one Mormon running for office, those who really believe in God will defeat him anyways, so don't worry about that; that's a temporary situation."[67][68]

In response, a representative for Romney told reporters that "bigotry toward anyone because of their beliefs is unacceptable."[69] The Catholic League compared Sharpton to Don Imus, and said that his remarks "should finish his career".[70] The Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, widely known as The Catholic League, is a Catholic anti-defamation non-profit group in the United States with the stated mission of defending the right of Catholics…to participate in American public life without defamation or discrimination. ... John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ...


On May 9, during an interview on Paula Zahn NOW, Sharpton said that his views on Mormonism were based on the Church's traditionally racist views regarding blacks and its interpretation of the so-called "Curse of Ham". On May 10, Sharpton called two apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and apologized to them for his remarks; he also asked to meet with them.[71] A spokesman for the Church confirmed that Sharpton had called and said that "we appreciate it very much, Rev. Sharpton's call, and we consider the matter closed."[72] He also apologized to "any member of the Mormon church" who was offended by his comments.[72] Later that month, Sharpton went to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he met with Elder M. Russell Ballard of the Church's Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and Elder Robert C. Oaks of the Church's Presidency of the Seventy.[73][74] is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Paula Zahn, during the December 6, 2004 broadcast of Paula Zahn Now. ... From the end of the nineteenth century until 1978, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints did not allow black men to be ordained to the priesthood or to enter its temples to perform ceremonies such as the Endowment or sealing that the church believes are necessary for... The Drunkenness of Noah by Giovanni Bellini, depicting Ham (center) laughing at his father, while Shem and Japheth cover him. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ... For ships of the United States Navy of the same name, see USS Salt Lake City. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Melvin Russell Ballard, Jr. ... The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ...


Political campaigns

Sharpton has run unsuccessfully for elected office on multiple occasions. Of his unsuccessful runs, he said that winning office may not have been his goal. "Much of the media criticism of me assumes their goals and they impose them on me," said Sharpton in an interview. Well, those might not be my goals. So they will say, 'Well, Sharpton has not won a political office.' But that might not be my goal! Maybe I ran for political office to change the debate, or to raise the social justice question."[11] Sharpton ran for a United States Senate seat from New York in 1988, 1992, and 1994. In 1997, he ran for Mayor of New York City. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


On January 5, 2003 Sharpton announced his candidacy for the 2004 presidential election as a member of the Democratic Party. is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential election results map. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


On March 15, 2004, Sharpton announced his endorsement of leading Democratic candidate John Kerry. is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


On December 15, 2005, Sharpton agreed to repay $100,000 in public funds he received from the federal government for his 2004 Presidential campaign. The repayment was required because Sharpton had exceeded federal limits on personal expenditures for his campaign. At that time his most recent Federal Election Commission filings (from January 1, 2005) stated that Sharpton's campaign still had debts of $479,050 and owed Sharpton himself $145,146 for an item listed as "Fundraising Letter Preparation — Kinko's."[75] is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ...


On April 2, 2007, Sharpton announced that he would not enter the 2008 presidential race. "I am not going to run," he said.[27] is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Celebrity status

Sharpton has made cameo appearances in the movies Cold Feet, Bamboozled, Mr. Deeds, and Malcolm X. He also has appeared in episodes of the television shows New York Undercover, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Girlfriends, My Wife and Kids, and Boston Legal. He hosted the original Spike TV reality television show I Hate My Job, and an episode of Saturday Night Live. He was a guest on Weekends at the DL on Comedy Central and has been featured in television ads for the Fernando Ferrer campaign for the New York City mayoral election, 2005. He also made a cameo appearance by telephone on the Food Network series, The Secret Life Of . . . , when host Jim O'Connor expressed disbelief that a restaurant owner who'd named a dish after Sharpton actually knew him. A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... For the teletext, see Bamboozle. ... Mr. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... New York Undercover was a one-hour urban police drama, which ran on the Fox Broadcasting Company network from 1994 to 1998. ... Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC... For other uses, see Girlfriend (disambiguation). ... My Wife and Kids is an American sitcom which ran on ABC from March 28, 2001 until May 29, 2005, starring Damon Wayans and Tisha Campbell. ... Boston Legal is an American dramedy television series that began airing on ABC on October 3rd, 2004. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // This article is about the genre of TV shows. ... I Hate My Job was an American reality television series about guys abandoning their careers for the chance to pursue unfulfilled dreams. ... SNL redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... Fernando Ferrer Fernando James Freddy Ferrer (born April 30, 1950 in the Bronx, New York) was the Borough President of The Bronx from 1987 to 2001, and was a candidate for Mayor of New York in 2001 and the Democratic Party nominee for Mayor in 2005. ... The New York City mayoral election of 2005 occurred on Tuesday November 8, 2005, with incumbent Republican mayor Michael Bloomberg defeating former Bronx borough president Fernando Ferrer, the Democratic nominee. ... Food Network is an American cable network that airs many specials and recurring (episodic) shows about food. ... The Secret Life of. ... Jim OConnor is an American actor and former host of the show The Secret Life Of. ...


During the 2005 Tony Awards, Sharpton appeared in a number put on by the cast of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is a one act musical comedy with music and lyrics by William Finn and a book by Rachel Sheinkin. ...


In June 2005, Sharpton signed a contract with Matrix Media to produce and host a live two-hour daily talk program, which did not air. In November 2005, Sharpton signed with Radio One to host a daily national talk radio program which began airing on January 30, 2006 entitled Keepin It Real with Al Sharpton. For any of the numerous radio stations with the name Radio One, see Radio One (disambiguation) Radio One, Inc NASDAQ: ROIA is an African-American managed U.S. company which owns and operates 69 radio stations in 22 American cities, and programs a channel on XM Satellite Radio, The Power. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tax issues

In May 2008, the Associated Press reported that Sharpton and his businesses owed almost $1.5 million in unpaid taxes and penalties. Sharpton owed $931,000 in federal income tax and $366,000 to New York, and his for-profit company, Rev. Al Communications, owed another $176,000 to the state.[8] The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


Bibliography

  • Go and Tell Pharaoh, Doubleday, 1996. ISBN 0-385-47583-7
  • Al on America, Dafina Books, 2002. ISBN 0-7582-0350-0

References

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  5. ^ Al Sharpton Talks with Bill O'Reilly. The O'Reilly Factor (2005-04-13). Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  6. ^ Bill O'Reilly Interview Al Sharpton. Ifilm (2006-02-02). Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  7. ^ a b c Taylor, Clarence (2002). Black Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the 21st Century. New York: Routledge, p. 127. ISBN 0415933269. 
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  9. ^ Taylor. Black Religious Intellectuals, p. 118. 
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  12. ^ William Addams Reitwiesner. Ancestry of Rev. Al Sharpton. Retrieved on 2007-06-19.
  13. ^ a b Alexandra Marks (2003-12-03). The Rev. Al Sharpton's latest crusade. The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved on 2007-06-19.
  14. ^ Jack Newfield (2002-01-07). Rev Vs. Rev. New York. Retrieved on 2007-06-19.
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  29. ^ Robert D. McFadden, "Black Man Dies After Beating In Queens", New York Times, December 21, 1986.
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  47. ^ Sexton, John. "A Life of Resistance: A Special Report;Gunman's Ardent Credo: Black Self-Sufficiency", New York Times, 1995-12-18. Retrieved on 2007-04-16.  Smith was found with a card identifying himself as Aboudima Moulika and he had also used the name Abugunde Mulocko.
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  52. ^ As Outrage Mounts in New York Over the Police Killing of Another African Immigrant, Democracy Now! Interviews Kadiatou Diallo, Mother of Amadou Diallo., Democracy Now!, Tuesday, May 27th, 2003
  53. ^ a b O'Reilly Interview April 18, 2006.
  54. ^ Prosecutor Asks to Exit Duke Case, The New York Times, January 13, 2007.
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  68. ^ audio file
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Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... An example of The OReilly Factors Talking Points Memo The OReilly Factor is an American talk show on the Fox News Channel hosted by commentator Bill OReilly, who discusses current political and social issues with guests from opposing ends of the political spectrum. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... iFilm is an online archive of short films, movie trailers, and other video clips of interest. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is an international newspaper published daily, Monday through Friday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Newfield, (1938-2004), was a muckraking journalist, employed by the New York Post. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... New York is a weekly magazine concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Morning Edition is an American radio news program produced and distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). ... NPR redirects here. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Action Network (NAN) is a charitable organization founded by the Reverend Al Sharpton and a group of political and human rights activists in New York City, New York in early 1991. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the original newspaper of the same name, see The New York Sun (historical) The New York Sun is a contemporary five-day daily newspaper published in New York City. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rich Lowry on C-SPAN Rich Lowry (born 1968 in Arlington, Virginia) is editor of the conservative monthly magazine, National Review. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel is the main daily newspaper of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and all of Broward County. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... New York is a weekly magazine concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Janet Jackson on the cover of Vibe in 1998. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Francisco Chronicle, the self-described Voice of the West, is Northern Californias largest newspaper. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... For the original newspaper of the same name, see The New York Sun (historical) The New York Sun is a contemporary five-day daily newspaper published in New York City. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... KSL-TV (Channel 5) is an NBC affiliate in Salt Lake City, Utah that broadcasts locally in analog on VHF channel 5 and in digital on UHF channel 38. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Al Sharpton
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Al Sharpton
  • Al Sharpton at the Internet Movie Database
  • The Al Sharpton Show
  • Salon Interview with Al Sharpton
  • Text of Democratic National Convention 2004 Speech
  • Court TV materials on the Tawana Brawley case, including the complete 1988 grand jury report
  • CNN story on the Pagones suit
  • On the Issues - Al Sharpton issue positions and quotes
  • OpenSecrets.org - Al Sharpton campaign contributions
  • Al Sharpton 1988 Poughkeepsie march photograph by photographer/filmmaker Clay Walker
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Clay Walker b. ... The following are lists of candidates in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Ten candidates vied for the nomination, including retired four-star general Wesley Clark, former Vermont Governor Howard Dean, John Edwards, and John Kerry. ... 2004 Democratic National Convention logo The 2004 Democratic National Convention culminated in the arrival of John Kerry on July 29 to address the delegates. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... This article is about the presidential campaign of John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and the nominee of the Democratic Party to challenge Republican incumbent President George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential election on November 2, 2004. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... This article contains lists of current and former candidates associated with the 2008 Democratic Party Primaries for the 2008 United States Presidential Election. ... Carol Elizabeth Moseley Braun (born August 16, 1947) is an American politician and lawyer who represented Illinois in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1999. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... Daniel Robert Graham (born November 9, 1936) is an American politician. ... Dennis John Kucinich (IPA: ) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... Lyndon LaRouche at a news conference in Paris in February 2006. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... GOP redirects here. ... 2004 Republican National Convention Logo President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney accepted their partys nomination to run for second terms. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... poop This article is about the presidential campaign of George W. Bush, the incumbent President of the United States and winner of the 2004 Presidential Election. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... This article lists officially declared Republican candidates for the President of the United States in the 2008 election. ... John Buchanan for the Nova Scotia John Buchanan was a Republican candidate in the 2004 Presidential race. ... Tom Laughlin as Billy Jack Tom Laughlin (born August 10, 1931) is an American actor and director. ... Bill Wyatt is a liberal Republican and was a candidate for the U.S. Republican Party presidential nomination, 2004. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... Constitution Party National Convention is held every 2-4 years. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... David Cobb appealing for votes at the annual Fighting Bob Fest in Baraboo, Wisconsin, September 2004 David Keith Cobb (born December 24, 1962 in San Leon, Texas) is an American ex-lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... Sheila Bilyeu was a candidate for the Green Partys nomination for President in 2004, and later ran for US Senate as an independent in Oklahoma, winning 5. ... Peter Miguel Camejo (born December 31, 1939) is an American financier, businessman, politican, and author. ... Paul Glover is an activist currently living in Ithaca, New York. ... Kent Mesplay is a scientist and political activist from San Diego, California. ... Lorna Salzman has been an environmental activist, writer, lecturer and organizer since the mid-1960s and was a candidate for the 2004 presidential nomination of the Green Party (GPUS). ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... (Redirected from 2004 Libertarian National Convention) The Libertarian National Convention is held every two years by the United States Libertarian Party to choose members of the Libertarian National Committee, and to conduct other party business. ... Badnarik campaigning in July 2004. ... Gary Nolan can refer to different people: Gary Nolan: a baseball player Gary Nolan: a radio host This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Aaron Russo promoting his film America: Freedom to Fascism Aaron Russo (February 14, 1943 to August 24, 2007) was an entertainment businessman, film maker, and libertarian political activist. ... Gene Amondson (b. ... Stanford E. Andy Andress is the author of The Civil War: The Sound of Thunder (1996) ISBN 0-9656257-1-0 which he co-authored with his wife Irene M. Deasy. ... Walter Frederick Brown (born July 28, 1926) was the presidential candidate of the Socialist Party USA in 2004. ... Róger Calero (born 1969 in Nicaragua) is one of the leaders of the Socialist Workers Party. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Thomas J. Harens (b. ... James Harris may refer to: James Howard Harris, 3rd Earl of Malmesbury (1807–1889) James Harris (comedy writer) James Harris (football player) (born 1947), first modern black professional American football quarterback to start a season James Harris (Grammarian) (1709–1780), English James Harris (politician), 2000 and 2004 U.S. presidential... Charles Jay (born 1960) was the Presidential nominee of the U.S. Personal Choice Party in the 2004 elections. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney, author, lecturer, political activist, and candidate for President of the United States in five elections. ... The name John Parker may refer to John Parker, an American judge who served at the Nuremberg Trials John Parker of South Carolina, a member of the Continental Congress (1786-1788) John Parker, Presidential Candidate (2004) of the Workers World Party John Parker, (1906-1987) British politician, Labour MP for... Leonard Peltier (born September 12, 1944) is a Native American activist and member of the American Indian Movement. ... Bill Van Auken (born 1950) was the presidential candidate of the Socialist Equality Party in the U.S. election of 2004. ... Eric Thomas Chester is an author, socialist political organizer and activist, and former university economics professor. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
NPR : Al Sharpton, The 2004 Democratic Presidential Candidates (1176 words)
Sharpton was Brawley's most recognizable defender, and even when Brawley's tale turned out to be a hoax, Sharpton never repudiated or apologized for his efforts on her behalf.
Sharpton is attempting to become a voice for the disaffected, the poor, the unemployed, the alienated.
Sharpton disagrees, saying that he is so well known that he doesn't have to raise the millions the other candidates are seeking.
Al Sharpton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2230 words)
Al Sharpton was born in 1954 to a prosperous family in Lake Charles, Louisiana.
In 1999, Sharpton led a protest in the shooting death of Amadou Diallo, a West African immigrant.
Sharpton recently announced that he is a supporter of equal rights for gays and lesbians, including their right to marry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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