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Encyclopedia > Al Rosen

Albert Leonard Rosen (born February 29, 1924, in Spartanburg, South Carolina), nicknamed "Al" and "Flip," was an American major league third baseman and right-handed slugger. He played his entire 10-year career (1947-56) with the Cleveland Indians in the American League, where he drove in 100 or more runs 5 years in a row, was a 4-time All-Star, twice led the league in home runs and twice in RBIs, and was an MVP. Rosen was extremely muscular, had tremendous power, and had excellent bat control. February 29th, or bissextile day, is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 306 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Spartanburg is a city in and the county seat of Spartanburg CountyGR6 in South Carolina, a state of the United States of America, and is the second largest city of the three primary cities in the Upstate region. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... The position of the third baseman Third base redirects here. ... In baseball, slugger is a popular term for a powerful batter with a high percentage of extra base hits, though they may not have a high batting average. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... This article is becoming very long. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run, with no errors on the play that result in the batter achieving extra bases. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ...


Rosen was one of the best all-time Jewish baseball players, along with Hank Greenberg (with whom he became close friends) and Sandy Koufax.[1][2] The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... For the insurance mogul nicknamed Hank Greenberg, see Maurice R. Greenberg Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911 - September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American player in Major League Baseball. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun on December 30, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers from 1955 to 1966. ...

Contents

Minor League Career

After returning from the Navy in 1946, Rosen played for the 1946 Pittsfield Electrics, where he was initially given a back-up role. He led the league in home runs (16) and RBIs (86), while batting .323, however, and became known as the "Hebrew Hammer." Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Rosen played for the Oklahoma City Indians in 1947, and had one of the finest individual seasons in league history. He led all hitters in average (.349), hits (186), doubles (47), extra-base hits (83), RBIs (141), total bases (330), slugging percentage (.619), and on-base percentage (.437). He was elected Texas League MVP. Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The Texas League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the South Central United States. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ...


In 1948 Rosen was Rookie of the Year for Triple-A Kansas City in the American Association. Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The Rookie of the Year award is given by a number of North American sports leagues to the top first-time professional athlete of the season. ... A Class A California League game in San Jose, California (1994) Minor baseball leagues are North American professional baseball leagues that compete at a level below that of Major League Baseball. ... Nickname: City of Fountains or Heart of America Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... The American Association has been the name of at least two leagues of professional United States of America. ...


Major League Career

Rosen made his first appearance in the major leagues in 1947 at the age of 23. The next year he won a World Series ring with the Indians. Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ...


In his first full season, in 1950, Rosen led the American League in home runs with 37, hitting more than any previous American League rookie. He also averaging a league-best 1 every 15.0 at bats, as well as HBP (10). He also batted .287 and had 116 runs batted in, while coming in 5th in the league with 100 walks and a .543 SP. Despite his home run title, he only came in 17th in the American League MVP Award voting. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... HBP may refer to: Hit by pitch Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... Walks may refer to: Base on balls Walking This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... SP is a two-letter acronym that may refer to: Sans Pression (Québec Hip Hop group, one member is also known as SP) São Paulo (city) São Paulo (state) Sapeur-pompier (French firefighter) SaskPower (Canada) SATA Air Acores, IATA airline designator Scalable POWERparallel, IBMs SP and... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ...


In 1951 he led the league in games played, and was 5th in the league in RBIs (102), extra-base hits (55), and walks (85). He batted .265, with 24 home runs. 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


Rosen led the American League with 105 RBI and 297 total bases in 1952. He also was 3rd in the league in runs (101) and slugging percentage (.524), 5th in hits (171) and doubles (32), 6th in home runs (28), and 7th in batting average (.302). Still, he only came in 10th in the American League MVP Award voting. In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The term doubles as used in sports like tennis and badminton refers to games with two players on each side. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ...


In 1953, Rosen led the American League in home runs (43), runs batted in (145), runs (115), slugging percentage (.613), and total bases (367). Defensively, he had the best range factor of all third basemen in the league (3.32), and led it in assists (338) and double plays (38). See also: 1952 in sports, other events of 1953, 1954 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Bill Vukovich won the Indianapolis 500 Sam Hanks won the season driving championship Formula One Championship - Alberto Ascari of Italy 24 hours of...


He batted .336, missed winning the batting title (and with it, the Triple Crown) on the last day of the season -- by only 1 percentage point, coming in second to Mickey Vernon. In Washington, the Senators heard that day that Rosen had made an out in his last at-bat, after getting 3 hits earlier in the game. Vernon was still ahead. The Senators conspired to make sure Vernon didn't have to bat again. Mickey Grasso doubled and let himself get picked off. Then Keith "Kite" Thomas singled, and was out when he ran leisurely to second. The term Triple Crown is used in several distinct contexts. ... The Washington Senators can refer to: The Washington Senators (officially named the Washington Nationals during the 1905–1956 seasons), an American League baseball team based in Washington, D.C. from 1901 to 1960. ...


He also came in second in OBP, and third in hits (201). He tied for 8th with Mickey Mantle in stolen bases. OBP may mean either: OBP, an abbreviation for on base percentage in baseball statistics This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mickey Mantle on a 1953 cover of Time Magazine. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1985 In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a baserunner successfully advances to the next base while the pitcher is delivering the ball to home plate. ...


He finally won the American League MVP Award in 1953. It was by an unprecedented unanimous vote. American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... See also: 1952 in sports, other events of 1953, 1954 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Bill Vukovich won the Indianapolis 500 Sam Hanks won the season driving championship Formula One Championship - Alberto Ascari of Italy 24 hours of...


In 1954, while batting .300, he led the league in sacrifice flies with 11, was 4th in SP (.506), and 5th in home runs (24), RBI (102), and obp (.404). He also hit consecutive home runs in the All-Star game despite a broken finger, and was named MVP of the All-Star Game. Cleveland won the pennant. It was his 5th straight year with 100 or more RBIs. Still, after the season Cleveland cut his $42,500 salary to $37,500. Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In baseball, a batted ball is considered a sacrifice fly (denoted by SF) if the following four criteria are met: There are fewer than two outs. ...


In 1955 Rosen was in the top 10 in the league in at-bats per home run, walks, and sacrifice flies. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Back problems and leg injuries caught up with him, and Rosen retired at the age of 32 in 1956.


Rosen was a .285 career hitter, with 192 home runs and 717 RBI in 1044 games. He was selected for the All-Star Game every year between 1952 and 1955. Rosen appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1955. The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the manager (the managers from the previous years... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After Major League Career

After retiring in 1956, became a stockbroker. Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rosen reentered baseball 20 years later as as a MLB executive. He was president of the Yankees (1978-79), then the Astros (1980-85), and then president and general manager of the Giants (1985-92). His maneuvering brought San Francisco from last place in 1985 to the NL West title in 1987. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as Americans... Astros redirects here, for other uses see Astros (disambiguation) Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 24,25,32,33,34,40,49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3,4,11,24,27,30,36,44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Troy Union Cities / Trojans (1879-1882) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rosen appeared a number of times as "Al" on Cheers. Cheers was a American situation comedy produced by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television for NBC. Cheers was created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. ...


Rosen's son Andy Rosen is a musician who sings under the name of Goat. His other son, Jim Rosen, resides in Los Angeles with Al's grandson, Zachary. The cover to Goats Great Life album Andy Rosen, stage name Goat, is an American singer, best known for his song Great Life which appeared on the soundtrack of the film I Know What You Did Last Summer. ... The cover to Goats Great Life album Andy Rosen, stage name Goat, is an American singer, best known for his song Great Life which appeared on the soundtrack of the film I Know What You Did Last Summer. ...


Jewish heritage

Rosen was tough (his nose was broken 13 times in his career), an amateur boxer, and had a reputation for standing up to anyone who dared insult his ancestry. Boxing, also called prizefighting (when referring to professional boxing), the sweet science (a common nickname among fans) or the gentlemans sport (used mainly in England), is a sport and martial art in which two participants of similar weight classification fight each other with their fists in a series of one...


Rosen grew up in a Miami neighborhood where Gentile youth called out to him, “Lookit the Jewboy. Go home and eat yuh matzos, sheeny.” A machine-made matzo Matzo (also Matzoh, Matzah, Matza, Hebrew מַצָּה maṣṣā) is a Jewish food item made of plain flour and water, which is not allowed to ferment or rise before it is baked. ...


Rosen told the sportswriter Roger Kahn that as a young player in the minors he had moments when he wished his name were not as obviously Jewish as Rosen. But after he became a major league star, he actually considered changing his name to Rosenthal or Rosenstein so that no one could possibly mistake him for anything but a Jew. "When I was up in the majors," he said, "I always knew how I wanted it to be about me....Here comes one Jewish kid that every Jew in the world can be proud of." Roger Kahn Roger Kahn (born 1927 in Brooklyn, New York) is one of Americas most prominent writers about sport - especially baseball. ...


In 1951, the television impresario Ed Sullivan, in his popular newspaper column, wrote about Rosen: "Of Jewish parentage, he is Catholic. At the plate, you`ll notice he makes the sign of the cross with his bat." Enraged, Rosen insisted on a full and public retraction, pointing out that the mark he always made with his bat was the letter "x." 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... An impresario is a manager or producer in one of the entertainment industries, usually Music or Theatre. ... Ed Sullivan Edward Vincent Sullivan (September 28, 1901 – October 13, 1974) was an American entertainment writer and television host, best known as the emcee of a popular TV variety show that was at its height of popularity in the 1950s and 1960s. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination...


Once a White Sox opponent called him a “Jew bastard.” Sox pitcher Rogovin, also Jewish, remembered an angry Rosen striding belligerently to the dugout and challenging the “son of a bitch” to a fight. The player backed down.[3] The Chicago White Sox are a Major League Baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Look up Bastard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up dugout in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term son of a bitch or son-of-a-bitch (often pronounced sumbitch in the Southern United States, and frequently euphemised to s. ...


Rosen challenging an opposing player who had “slurred [his] religion” to fight him under the stands. When a Red Sox catcher called Rosen anti-Semitic names, he called time and “started toward him, to take him on.” Hank Greenberg recalled that Rosen “want[ed] to go into the stands and murder” fans who hurled anti-Semitic insults at him. The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the insurance mogul nicknamed Hank Greenberg, see Maurice R. Greenberg Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911 - September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American player in Major League Baseball. ...


During his career, Rosen declined to play on the High Holy Days. The High Holy Days or High Holidays of Judaism refers to the holidays of Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year) and Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement). In an extended sense it can mean the penitential period in the Jewish year which begins on Rosh Chodesh Elul, includes Rosh Hashanah and the...


Early Years

  • Rosen and his family moved to Miami when he was three years old. He grew up in the southwest section of Miami, which is now the heart of Little Havana.
  • Rosen grew up without a father, and was raised by three women: his grandmother, mother, and aunt.
  • Rosen attended the University of Florida in the September session of 1941–42, where he played third base for the Gators.
  • Rosen enlisted after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and spent 2 years in the Navy fighting in the Pacific during World War II, delaying his professional baseball career.

This article is about the city in Florida. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For the insurance mogul nicknamed Hank Greenberg, see Maurice R. Greenberg Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911 - September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American player in Major League Baseball. ... For other uses, see Asthma (disambiguation). ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a public land-grant research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ...

Quote

  • "The greatest thrill in the world is to end the game with a home run and watch everybody else walk off the field while you're running the bases on air. "

Awards

Member of the Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame (2006). 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Member of the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame (1980). 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...


Member of the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.


Member of the Texas League Hall of Fame (2005). 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


External link

Preceded by
Ted Williams
American League Home Run Champion
1950
Succeeded by
Gus Zernial
Preceded by
Gus Zernial
American League RBI Champion
1952-1953
Succeeded by
Larry Doby
Preceded by
Larry Doby
American League Home Run Champion
1953
Succeeded by
Larry Doby
Preceded by
Bobby Shantz
American League Most Valuable Player
1953
Succeeded by
Yogi Berra

  Results from FactBites:
 
Al Rosen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (216 words)
Albert Leonard Rosen (born February 29, 1924 in Spartanburg, South Carolina), (died March 2, 2006), nicknamed "Flip", is an American former third baseman and right-handed slugger.
Rosen won the MVP Award in 1953, after posting career-numbers in batting average (.336), home runs (43) and RBI (145).
Rosen was a.285 career hitter with 192 home runs and 717 RBI in 1044 games.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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